The Daily Astorian. (Astoria, Or.) 1876-1883, October 28, 1877, Image 3

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Broom Corn Culture.
I advise no one to raise broom corn uh
less he is' fully posted. More men have
been broken up, financially, by it, than
by almost any other ciop. A man raises
a little patch on choice land, which does
well; he then figures what an acre will
produce, and is astonished. He at once
concludes that he will plant largely, and
get rich. He does so, expecting to tend
as much land in broom corn as he could
in Indian corn, and therefore do the la
bor himself, and save the profits. The
result, summed up in a few words, is that
for lack of proper care in hoeing and
harvesting he has about half a crop of
biush that is worth about half the
market price: and when sold will just
about pay the extra hell) that he did not
expect to hire.
Broom corn should be planted about
the same time as Indian corn, but the
earlier kinds will mature a good crop of
brush on rich laud from June 10. It
will do well on any land that will pro
duce a good crop of Indian corn, but a
sandy loam is preferable. Plow as for
corn, pulverize thoroughly and mark out
about three feet apart,or 30 inches, if you
can cultivate it that close. Make as small
a mark as possible, and cross-mark the
.same. Five stalks will do well this dis
tance in each hill. .1 plant with a hand
planter, so adjusted as to drop from five to
seven seeds one that forces the seed
into the giound, and prefer that kind be
cause seed to planted will stand more dry
weather than when simply dropped and
covered. But plant only enough to insure
a good stand, for all extra plants must be
pulled out by hand. Two quarts of seed
properly planted is plenty for an acre.
I once read an agricultural report in
which it was advised to plant a peck, and
even more per acre, and pull out the extra
plants. In my experience of thirteen
crops, I have learned that every unneces
sary plant or weed detracts from the crop';
and that when just the right number of
)lants start in a hill, they are hardier
and will produce better brush. And be
sides the extra labor of thinning out is
o.ten greater than tne hoeing. After
planting hitch one horse to the crusher
and drive between two rows, taking two
at a time, which levels the land so as to
prevent washing in case of heavy rain,
and also leaves the land in better condi
tion for the cultivator. I cultivate one row
at a time, with a two-horse drag and cul
tivator combined, having interchangeable
teeth. It is very necessary to keep the
weeds down. If apiece of broom corn gets
very weedy you might as well plow it
under for all the profit clear of expenses
that will meet you. It will need one good
hoeing by hand ; after that the weeds can
be kept down with the cultivator. Some
plant in drills three and one-half feet
apart, but it takes more hard labor and is
more apt to be crooked. I have experi
mented in various ways, and my best crops
of straightest brush have been planted in
hills and cultivated both ways, and the
rows as close together as is convenient to
' work between with a horse. My next
article will be on cutting and scraping.
7. A. 2., in Ohio Farmer.
The Blackberry. It is strange the
blackberry is not more extensively
planted where it succeeds well. After
a plantation is once started it requires
but little care and attention. Nipping
back the new growth while growing,
and cleaning between the rows two or
three times in the spring and early sum
mer, is all that is necessary. They do
better on light, porous soil, and should
not be worked among late in the season,
as it promotes late growth and tender
ness of plant. They yield so abund
antly and sell at such high rates, and can
be harvested at such ow rates, that
they prove one of the most profitable
crops grown where they do not winter
kill. On our farm at Palmyra we have
some eight acres, and they have proved
the most profitable to us of any fruit we
have grown. The Lawton is the old
stand-by with us, it is so productive and
large. In such States as Virginia, Mary
land, Kentucky, Missouri, and in favor
able localities north, where the peach
thrives, the blackberry crop is exceed
ingly profitable, anpi black and red
raspberries, too, if giown in the States
named, for northern markets pay. Fruit
Recorder.
"Wild Boot Plants. The root plants
growing all wild over the country ought to
be examined and experimented upon by
agriculturists. "We have abundant en
couragement in favor of such a course,
in the history of tobacco, potato, sugar
beet, spearmint, wiutergreen and a host
of other natural products that, by judi
cious culture, have been raised from the
Tank of weeds to a first-class position
among profitable crops. The sugar beet
especially is worthy of note; it was
originally an unsightly plant' growing
wild in southern Europe. By culture it
has been improved and changed in char
acter, and now yields nearly one-third of
the total sugar crop of the world, and
represents an industry worth some hun
dreds of millions of dollars. As the
government of the United States has set
aside large tracts of land to endow agri
cultural colleges,itis not asking too much
for some of these institutions to cause ex
periments to be made upon what are now
called weeds. Many of these wild
plants contain alkaloids, sugar, tannic
-acid and fiber for paper, and could by
culture be converted into valuable
products.
Honolulu travelers visiting the crater
of Kilakeua, during the first week of
September, represent it as very active
and brilliant. The old South lake was,
on the 10th instM about 1,000 feet in
length and 600 feet in width, boiling and
spouting.
Venice in 1877.
It is the fifteenth of August, and" in
the afternoon. The sky is almost as clear
a blue as we have for most of the year in
New York. The VeRetians consider it a
remarkably fine specimen of their weath
er. It is about as warm as an average
warm day in July in an American city;
but the movement of a boat over the
water and the generally shaded canals
prevent one from feeling the heat as in
ordinary streets. On church steps, and
in the churches, and lying loosely around
generally, are numbers of Venetian men,
as comfortably asleep as if they owned
all the land around the Adriatic. Writ
ing in view of the Grand Canal the Fifth
Avenue of Venice and presuming that
a large proportion of my readers have not
seen the place, let me try to give, not a
historical, or poetical, or rhapsodical, but
a matter-of-fact and, let me hope, com
mon sense view of the city.
Several large and many small islands,
rifcing only a few feet above the sea, were
taken pose.sion of by refugees from the
mainland ; and as they fished and traded,
and grew into a great community, they
built according to the requirements of
the place. Italian marble was near and
abundant; labor was cheap; trade was
long exceptionally good; conquest
brought the spoils of other peoples and
lands; and so in time a great city
grew up, with only narrow strips of
walking snace alonsr the sides ot the
houses, the middle of the street (as we
should say) being water. The buildings
having gone up as they were wanted, no
order was followed. Hence the little
canals are crooked and winding in every
conceivable way, aDd a multitude of small
bridges is rendered necessary. The
bridges are generally low, and the arch
form is preserved outside, an easy stair
way following the arch. Numerous lanes
three to five feet in width connect
main thoroughfares, and high houses
rise on each side, with the lower windows
iron-barred like those of a prison. The
houses rise, without any sidewalk, out of
many of the canals, and especially out of
the Grand Canal the "palaces" and bet
ter kind of houses having marble steps to
the water. The backs of such houses
cammoLly communicate with terra firma.
The boat the only kind of conveyance,
quadrupeds not being used coniey "to
the hall door." Such is the general
structure.
Now for the houses. They are solidly,
and many of them irregularly, built, most
of them colored, very long ago, appar
ently, with that peculiar pale yellow
which is a favorite in Italy. Those with
marble fronts have become so darkened
and blackened that it requires an effort
of memory to do justice to their material.
The palaces are rather disappointing.
They are on the Grand Canal, are known
by thick posts in the water, many of
them colored in stripes, so that they look
like overgrown barbers' poles. Not a
few of the largest are now hotels (I write
in one of them), and on their scale of size,
accommodation and comfort, we have
many hundreds of "palaces" in3uch cities
as New York, Chicago, Boston, St. Louis
and Philadelphia. Marble stairs, inlaid
floors, without carpets, and rather taw
dry frescoing on the ceilings, mark them
all. Let no American hanker after such
palaces.
Nor condolas. Divesteaoi the poetry,
what isa gondola? A long, black, ill
painted, generally rather shabby-looking
boat, the bow of which rises well out t)f
the water. It retains the "prow" of the
ancient Boman galley, of which it is a
descendant,and has a heavy iron, halberd
like beak, which at a distance looks a lit
tle like a swan's neck and head, and
which counterbalances the weight of the
man who stands on the covered stern and
paddles the boat with one broad-bladed
oar. The seats are in the middle, and a
movable screen, round or square, cur
tained usually, covers them. Those of
private families have a useless train of
black cloth falling behind the seats, and
giving a funeral aspect to the convey
ance, and I regret to say, in every case
coming under my notice, in keeping
with the general look of faded respecta
bility worn by Venice. Such is the gon
dola of poetry and song, history and
fancy. One can understand how it af
forded some repose in a hot city that had
no walks, where the houses overlooked
everything, and the din aid clatter of
Italian street talk are interminable.
It must not be thought that this is the
whole of Venice. It is, however, the
Venice in which men and women live
their ordinary lives,unafiected in any great
degree by lions in bronze, or pillars in
marble a thousand years old, or even by
Titian's or Tintoretto's pictures, of which
the most, as here presented, appear common-place
indeed. It is not the old
Veilice of grasping and successful am
bition, of proud and boastful money-
power; but it is that to which pride and
ostentation in time conduct a people.
Servility, lying, and the offensive forms
of poverty are everywhere aj)parent.
George Washington is highly venerated
in Northern Italy. His bust, with the
most flattering inscription, adorns Luga
no, and a snowy hotel with his name
invites American patronage. One could
wish that his hatchet so familiar to
American youth could be used here, for
that power to tell a lie which he dis
claimed is all too well developed.
Venice has a palace on which millions
have been expended, a profusion of
churches with costly, pretentious and
ancient decoration, but among the relics
of her past her Bridge of Sighs is as
famous as her Rialto (by the way, a very
ordinary bridge), and her prison is in
spected with more feeling than her pal
ace. O, how sweet is the thought of
Freedom, as one follows a guide's torch
through those dark and narrow dens, in
which justice was murdered with many a
tortured victim l On Tery hand Art
meets the eye in the frescoes, mould
ing, cornices, in carvings, in mosaics in
numerable. The tendency now is to
magnify Art as a great civifizer. Art is
the product of a luxurious and wealthy
civilization ; but it is easy to overestimate
it as an inherent civilizing power. One
wood common-school, like some we
know, would do more to elevate the
pauperized and demoralized Venetians
than all the costly and pretentious deco
rations gathered around St. Mark's Place.
Without ignoring the curious interest at
taching to the ancient "Bride of the
Adriatic," one turns away from it with
profound thankfulness for the institutions
of America, and the life of this nineteenth
century. By Rev. John Hall, J). D. ,2V. Y.
The Sultan's Way.
Two hundred years ago when the
Turks made war it was sufficient for the
Sultan to command a thing, and it was
done. When Suleiman the Great was
marching to the relief of Breda, his ad
vance came to the River Drave, and found
it impassable by reason of a flood. The
pasha in command, who was, by the way,
the minister of war, sent a s-taft officer to
the Sultan to say that it would be need
ful to wait for the subsidence of the wa
ters before the army could cross. The
Sultan heard the message, and then said
to the aide-de-camp: "Tell the pasha that
in four days I shall be at the Drave with
this army. If the bridge for us to cross is
not then ready, I shall strangle him with
my own hands." The bridge was ready
and the army crossed at the appointed
time, but several hundreds of men had
been drowned in the process of bridging
the flood. So when artillery was needed
for the siege operations, and no artillery
could be brought up, because'of the lack
of roads, the Sultan had only to say:
"Have artillery here or 'you die," and the
artillery was always forthcoming, al
though in several iustances metal had to
be brought upon camels and the casting
of cannon had to be added to the ordinary
list of siege operations. A little of the
same spirit remains with the Turks of
to-day. They have no cavalry and no
money to buy horses, and yet cavalry
must be had. Orders are sent to the dis
trict governors to send cavalry to the
front instantly, and it is forthcoming.
In every district there are any number of
Circassians who are hankering after a
fight with the Russians. The governor
simply orders out these Circassians, and
they help themselves to horses and arti
cles of equipment wherever thev find
them, and report for duty with smiling
countenances, and no questions are asked.
The cab companies of Paris have just
started a new style of vehicle, which is
very odd-lookiug, and is not very popu
lar. It is a sort of cross between the
London hansom and the French fiacre,
the body thereof being like unto the
hansom, but the driver occupies a
seat in front, and not behind, as on the
London cab. Just now it is not partic
ularly pleasant to take a ride in one of the
new carriages, as your Parisian cabby is
nothing if not conservative, and the
drivers who have charge of the new in
novation are assailed on all sides by
shouts and cries from their comrades that
are more facetious than complimentary.
"Wood-box," "vapor bath," "fire extin
guisher," "Sedan chair on wheels," are
some of the epithets wherewith the new
vehicles are greeted.
Chables Lamb's connection with
Christ's Hospital is to be commemmor
ated by the presentation of a Lamb's
medal, in silver, to the best English essay
ist of each year among the Blue Coat
boys. The die has recentlv been finished.
A Neglectful Liver.
The bile has a three-fold part assigned to
it by the great manager, Nature. It' assists
in the digestive process, acts as a coloring
agent of the blood, and is essential to the
evacuative function. When the liver grows
torpid, complete chaos ensues in the stom
ach and bowels; the bile is injected into the
circulation in large quantities, and constipa
tion and indigestion are produced. Fains
under the right shoulder blade and through
the right side, headaches, vertigo, yellowness
of the skin, furred tongue and nausea, also
follow. But these and other symptoms of
biliousness, and the disorders which accom
pany it, are entirely removed by Hostetter'a
Stomach Bitters, that benign rectifier of or
ganic disturbance and remedy for physical
weakness. Intermittent and remittent fever,
urinary and uterine troubles, rheumatism,
gout, and other maladies, also yield to the
remedial influence of the great corrective
and invigorant. It is the people's chosen
remedy.
Leef s & Co.'s California Yeast
Cakes.
Wherever these Yeast Cakes have been
used they have civen perfect satisfaction.
We warrant them to do all that the circular
or printed dirertions claim for them. They
"received the premium at the last State
Fair over all competitors.
The grains and vegetables from which
these Cakes are made are selected with the
freatest care, aud being manufactured at
acramento, we shall always furnish them
fresh. From recent discovery in their
preparation, ilr. Leef has been enabled to
quicken the action of the yeast growth so as
very greatly to add to their convenience, and
making them a better substitute for the
Vienna Yeast than any yet introduced to
public favor. They are intended to take the
place very largely of Yeast Powders, and at
the same time to add to the fiaTor of all arti
cles in which they are used. Adams, McNeil
& Co., Sacramento, Cal.
Physicians of high standing unhesitating
ly give their indorsement to the use of the
Graefenberg-Marshall's Catholicon for all fe
male complaints. The weak and debilitated
find wonderful relief from a constant use of
this valuable remedy. Sold by all druggists.
$1.50 per bottle.
A Cube for rheumatism, simple, but pene
trating to the seat of pain and giving instant
relief, is Trapper's Indian Oil. Sold every
where, at fifty cents per patent flask.
TJsb Burnham's
and neuralgia.
Abietine for rheumatism
Purchasing Agency.
Ladies who are desirous of bavin u goods
purchased for them in San Frauciscu can do
so by addressing Mrs. W. H. Ashley, who
will send samples of ijoods for their inspec
tion and approval. Would suy that I am an
experienced dress-maker, and have the ad
vantage of buying at wholesale, and would
give my patrons the benefit of same. Goods
purchased and sent C. O. D. Send far Cir
cular. Any information in regard to styles
cheerfully given. Would add that I have a
tirst-class establishment for Dressmaking,
and am prepared to execute country orders
with dispatch. Address Mas W. H. Ashley,
120 Sutter street Room 51 Sau Francisco.
Coughs and Colds. Those who are suf
ferlng from Coughs, Colds, Hoaeness, Sore
Throat, &c, should try "Jroicn'x Bronchial
Troches."
Usb Burnham's Abietine fr croup, colds,
sore throat and hoarseness.
FxLLHyles of "Domestic" Paper Fashions new and
beautiful de-Igns. Send stump for catalogue. 29
Post street, Stn Francisco.
MONTGOMERY'S TEMPERANCE HOTEL, 227
Second at., San Francisco. Veal Tirkets. 1.
30
PAGE CATALOGUE FREE TO AGENTS
Wibmtrk & Co.. 17 New Montgomery fet.. S. F.
rvR. CHRISTOPHER, 204 SUTTER, CORNER
S
Kearny; Dentistry flrst-clas; prices 'lw.
CARDS, JS1; Cabinet S2 perdoz. PEOPLE'S
J Airr GALLERY. 4 Third St., San Francisco.
DR. FERGUSON, GRADUATE DENTIST.
FICE, 223 Kearny Street. San Fraud'-co.
OF-
BURNHAM'S ABIETINE FOR BURNb. iCALDS,
Cuts and Sores of all kinds
AGENTS "WANTED for the Flat Ready Dress Plalt
er. N. M. Wueelkr, 121 Montgomery st., S. F
0T Richest Transparent Cards "Nobby scenes;" no
iO two alike 15c, post-paid. Winru Bi:osM 721
Sixth street. New York.
$45
PREMIUM 1VATCH AND CHAIN-a
stem-winder. Free with every order. Out
lit free. J. B. Gaylord &, Co., ChicaKO. 111.
;;
MAGJfKTIC TX3IEPIKCK. Metal
works. Hunter case. Samnle Wattta free to
"Agents. A. COULTER & CO., Chicago 111.
QA ELEGANT
PERFUMED CARDS NO TWO
UU alike.
Diamond. Reno. &c. with name. 13 cents.
D. WIN&HIP, Montowesr, Conn.
tr. j. ii.
WILBIItT, DETIST, 703
fan Francisco, room 12. over "Wld-
JL Market St.
ber's drug store. Laughing gas administered.
Heavy Solid Sliver Thlmhle 50 ctn., Or
eavy Gold filled, warranted 20 vears, SI.. "SO.
Ag'ta send stamp for catalogue. VAN & CO., Chicago.
UNION DENTAL ROOMS. BEST "WORK IN
town at the lowest price. 2o3 Montgomery
ave., cor. Kearny St., S. F. Extracting. 23cts and 50ots.
Filling, $1. Sets of teeth. $6. DK. I. SALA.
LIVE AXU LET iri'E-SPLEXDID
set of Teeth, only 7. at the Dental roonu of
T. BOLTON, 10 Fourth St., Sun Francisco, room 1.
Filling a specialty. All work warranted.
WHAT a Liule Girl ctin Make icith Wood Splin ,"
I J FIR I 4U different patterns, size 10x15, two sheets.
12 cents, postpaid; SO cents per doz; $2.00 per 100.
J. JAY GOULD, 16 Bromneld street, Buxton, Mass,
PHOTOGRAPHIC APPAltiTBS !
Latest Invention; anybody can operate it with
perfect success: complete outfits from $5 to
$30. Chrome Photography outfits. $3; Hello
graph, ti 50. Send stamp for full information
to E. Sackmaxx fe Co., MTrs. 27S Pearl st.. N. Y.
IPEIITQ D0 YOtJ WANT THE BEST LINE
Hut.fl 1 J of Chromos and FniuieK in
America? Do you want the lowest prices and free
outfltH? If so, aidres
ALBERT DURKEE & CO.,
ll'-t Monroe Street. Chicnro.
EKMOVA.X,. J. L. COGSWELL,
Dentist, has removed to 282
Sutter Street, (Y. M. C. A. Building),
San Francisco. Ether or Chloroform
administered.
T IVE AGENTS
WAXTED AT OXCE
to sell the best thing ever Invented. A combined
Burglar Alarm, Sash Holder Door and "Window
Fastener for 50 ct. Sadler & Bakkows, 1212
Market street, San Francisco.
A 3-CENT POCKET-BOOK.
Any agent or canvasser, or any person who has ever
canvassed or acted as salesman, or any idle person out
of employment, or any person seeking a chance to
earn an honorable living, can have sent to them a sub
stantial, serviceable pocket-book by simply sending
a three-cent postage stamp to the undersigned. The
pocket-book contains two sides subdivided into- re
positories for bills, mems., silver, postage stamps and
cards. Send a 3-cent stamp and the pocket-book will
be mailed Immediately by return mail. Address GEO.
F. MERCHANT & CO., 112 Monroe st., Chicago, HI.
NOTICE OF CHANGE!
PIOREXCE SEAVIXO MACHINX
- Ageucy, 19 New Montgomery street. San Fran
cisco. Hereafter a moderate charge will be made for
Cleaning and Repairing old Machines that have been
in use longer than the time for which sewing machines
are usually warranted, and customers will be re
quired to pay the freight.
FLORENCE SEWING MACHINE CO.
N.CURRY &BRO.
113 Sansome Street, San Francisco,
Importers and Dealers in every descrip
tion of
ISreech and Muzzle-Loading
RIFLES, SHOT-GUNS AND PISTOLS
PIANOS
frw BEAUTIFUL ROSEWOOD
PIANOS OF
jLiJJ best make, worth, old rates, S50.
SQUAKK
and UPRIGHT, guaranteed for sir years, at the low
rates of S250 each. 100,000 pieces of Sheet Music,
worth SO cents each, at O cents. Also, the celebrated
ATTTIiiELL PIAXOS, the best In use. Cata
logues free. lOO ORGANS at half price.
23"Plea3e state where you saw the advertisement.
T. M. ASTISELI A CO
SG5 Market Street, San Francisco
"PACIFIC ELASTIC TRUSS."
D 9-TWO DOLLARS WILL BUT
tDZf this new invention, which is
GUARANTEED SUPERIOR to any
Tru sold by the so-called Califor
nia Elastic Truss Co., or moxkt re
funded. Pacific Elastic Tbuss
Compaxt, 627 Sacramento street,
San Francisco.
INFORMATION TO COUNTRY KESIDENTS
The St. George Hotel
812 Kearny Street, San Francisco.
TVTEW FOUR-STOICY BRICK,
containing
lOO
bea
beautiful light sunny rooms, newly furnished, to
rent hv the Dav. week or Monin, in suite or sinel
ono.hoir th usual rates, enabling one to live in the
by the Day, week or Monm, in suite
: or single, at
city in fine style for the small sum of One Dollar per
day. TRY IT.
INTERNATIONAL HOTEL
824 sad 826 Kearny St., Saa Francisco.
81 SO and 82 OO PER DAY.
H. C. PATRIDGE, - - - - Pbopbixtob.
Ttpo Concord Coaches, with the name of the
Hotel on, will always be in waiting at the landing to
conyey passengers to the Hotel free. H Be sure yon
get into the right Coach; If you do not. they will
charge yon.
COMMERCIAL HOTEL
SAN PRANCISCO.
r
OHN KELLY. JB., FOR 26 YEARS PROPRIETOR
O of
the Brooklyn notej, o. r ., is now connected
rtth the COMMERCIAL HOTEL, on Montgom-
nnlv-wlth
p.rv tLvt. and Kearny St.. S.
first-class and commanding new 4-atory hotel, with
elevator, etc., and offers superior facilities at low
rates. Free coach and carriages from all points. A
call from former patron3 reapectfnlly invited.
iiib iiuinmerciai is a
rQii
TfotStlis
CALVERT'S
CAKBOUO
SHEEP WASH
S3 per galtoa.
T. W. JACKSON, Saa Fraa
claco. Sole Agent for the Pa
cific Coast.
0. & P. E. TIBRELL & CO.,
IHPOBTJ5BS JLND JULNTTFACTtrEXBa OT
BOOTS AND SHOES,
IfO. 419 CLAY 8TRKET,
Between Sansome and Battery, SAN FRANCISCO.
Manufacturers of Men's. Boys', Youth's, and Chil
dren's FINE CALF BOOTS.
Orders solicited and promptly filled. All slsea and
qualities mode at the lowest market prices.
Please examine the goods and prices.
TIME AND STOEM
ALONE FURNISH THE TRUE TEST FOR AGRI
cultural Machinery. Short-lived patent inven
tion8, manufactured 3,000 miles away, are being
offered to the Farmers under every apparent induce
ment. The
ECLIPSE WINDMILL
Ha been Tested. lO Years ;
Is used by 4,000 American "Farmers ;
Is made here in California from
Spruce "Wood;
Is fally Warranted, or no Sale.
Send for Circulars on Pumps and "Windmills.
CHAKLES P. HOAfV
IIS Boale St.. San Francisco.
DR. L. J. CZAPKAY'S
Medical Institute,
209 KEABHYST., San Francisco.
ESTABLISHED IN 1851.
POR THE PERMANENT CURE OF ALL SPECIAL
and Cnronlc Diseases, as also all Female Com
plaints and Diseases of the Nervous System.
The immense destruction of human life annually,
from Chronic and Difficult Diseases, caused this old
and reliable Institute to be established first In Phila
delphia, Penn., In 1350, and afterwards in San Fran
cisco, Cal., in 1854, as a private Dispensary, In order to
afford the afflicted the best Medical and Surgical
treatment, for the above and all other affections and
complaints. Permanent and quick cures at reasona
ble charges.
Consultations at the Institute or by letter free.
Medic nes sent by express. Address, L. J. Czapkay,
M. D.. 209 Kearny street San Francisco.
MITCHELL WAGONS,
A. W. 8 AHB0BN, Agent, S3 Beale St., S. F.
A5?V ft)
L
I TOE Mitchell Farm, Freight and Spring Wagons
. are well known as the best In the market and will
withstand the climate of the Pacific Coast better
than any other. Mr. Sanborn also keeps at the same
place. Imported from his own manufactory at Man
chester, N. H., a good assortment of his celebrated
THORQUBHBRAGE, EXPRESS
ivriiTg -Wagons.
Of all sizes. IWAlao, Bnarles, Phaetons
Light Carriages of all kinds.
and
WAKELEE'S
Bath
Sheep !
O
-
A CnsAP axd Effect
its Dip fob SCAB, and
all other Sheep Dis
eases. "We earnestly recommend
all "Wool Growers to try
it.
CHRISTY & WISE,
607 Front San Francisco.
HEK1T Willi tVXX.
CALIFORNIA YEAST CAKES,
vzrrnfnTW
rfei&iLSSM
NOW fresh on the market, and only goods of the
kind MAN"OTACTirBED on the coast. For Light
Bread. Light Biscuits, Rusk, Hot Rolls, Hot Cakea.
Doughnuts; in fact this article cannot be excelled, II
used In any rapacity where good yeast Is required.
Manufactured by ,
F. M. LEEF & CO., Sacramento City, Cal.
IFor Sale by Wholesale and Retail Grocers gen
erally. Retail price, per package, 25 cents. Samples
sent Jree by mall.
1 .,
DR. GUNN'S
Aromatic Elixir
BITTERS.
THE GREAT REMEDY FOR CONSTTPATIOK
and a score of ills arising from Irregular action of
the liver. These Bitters are pleasant to the taste
and should be nsed in all cases of Dyspepsia,
Conntlpation. Headache. DizzineHH.Xoss
of Appetite, Humors of the Blood and
Piles.
jfcg" Ask your Druggist for them and take nothing
else. A3$Jk.X ALST'E & CO.
Proprietors and Manufacturers, S)$ Brenham Place,
aDOve tne riaza, san ranclsco.
GLOVE-FITTING
CORSETS...
UNRIVALUDCORSET H
TaeFnenasonnis
are wow nwnDereaDy
Mill IONS.
fries an much rsducttfS
MtDALFlLUtlVLV
A-CENTENNIAL.
tte. thm Genuiss. and
beware of imitations
ASKAUO FOR
TtirtMSON'S
UNBREAKABLE STEEl&jj
The best foods made.
; that the name of
Thomson and the
TradeMarJcaCnowN.are
ttamMid nn fcVWVCOTSetiSRSl.
iHUfclii
mMSBBBM
M..iiw.rt.MM .. -"- i..niLiwiwmiEiii fH6.ii3WT jWWWMIPB
"Tr"nm nr m -
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