The west shore. (Portland, Or.) 1875-1891, July 01, 1877, Page 217, Image 29

Below is the OCR text representation for this newspapers page. It is also available as plain text as well as XML.

    uly.
THE W EST SHORE.
217
TABLE ROCK.
Table Rock, an engraving of which
WO present In this number, is one of
the prominent natural land-marks In
Southern Oregon. It is situated on the
north bank of Rogue river, in lackson
county, and about twelve miles from
the town of Jacksonville. For many
miles along the Oregon and California
stage road it is plainly visible, and is an
object of admiration to all who appre
ciate the grand and picturesque in na
ture's panorama. Viewed from a dis
tance, on the southern and southeastern
sides, it resembles a vast fortress with
frowning battlements and insurmount
able walls. Its top has the appearance
of a level surface, which is more strik
ing because it is seen without back
ground, except the clear sky, at this
season of the year. Upon close in
spection, all ideas formed from a dis
tant view vanish. Its symmetrical pro
portions are lost and it is found to be
the molten lava. This opinion is
strengthened by the fact that on the
outside, and at the base of the eastern
wall, a small stream of asphaltum issues
forth and congeals into flinty hard
ness after being exposed a short time
to atmospheric influences. The high
est point of the wall is on the east side.
Here there is a perpendicular precipice
of three hundred feet, and for more
then two miles the height varies from
one hundred and fifty to two hundred
feet. The rock is basalt, and it rests
upon a gray sandstone base, which
seems to dip from the outer edge of the
wall, inward. The upper two-thirds
of the basalt has a smooth surface, anil
the lower third is crystalline, or, rather,
composed of groups of Doric columns,
cemented together.
Table Rock is an object of historic
as well as geologic interest. In a mili
tary view it is one of the most easilv
fortified strongholds in the world. This
The Umatilla river, on account of its
valley, is one of the most important
streams of Eastern Oregon. The
Umatilla valley, together with the bot
tom lands of several tributary creeks,
furnishes a fine tract of rich alluvial
land, having a high reputation for its
agricultural capacity. Large sections
are open for settlement, ranging from
mountainousandwoodedtracts to rolling
prairies covered with bunch grass, and
lastly, the narrow but rich bottoms of
streams, rendering it an easy matter to
select a farm or timber claim as may be
preferred. Should the Indian reserva
tion be thrown open for settlement,
Which will undoubtedly bo done at the
expiration of the present treaty within
two years, it w ill make Umatilla the
richest comity in Oregon.
A Xkw Way of Washino
Clothes. This process comes from
France, sav es labor and money, lives
clothes a superior whiteness, am! re-
A NEWSPAPER'S FUNCTION.
In a recent speech of an attorney in
a libel suit, the following language oc
curs: There has grown up a sort of
common law of obligation, recognized
mutually by the pros ami the people,
by which the people expect that the
press, a.- distributors of useful intelli
gence, shall inform them, as well what
is to he avoided us what is to he sought,
as well who is to be suspected as who is
to he confided in. And a newspaper,
as a garnerer and distributor of news,
is a public monitor, and it is its duty to
admonish the people against frauds and
shams, and Impostures and dishonesties.
It is to be a beacon as well as a guide;
and whenever a public newspaper,
through its diversified Appliances for
the collection and distribution of infor
mation, disco ers anywhere in public
life ami in public nvocations, whether
it he a lawyer, or a clergyman, or a
physician, a man who, instead of secur
ing the public welfare by honorable
methods ami practices, limply prowls
about in the back yard of Ins profession,
and uses the means and instrumentalities
which honorable title gives him to pan-
jBj. Bray? moui TKjfitfBEHjBflB ' " HKtifc A- HtMSlSpSmjfcv vr&V
TABLE ROCK, SOUTHERN OREGON. From Pho
Pari i iik mi, Ja
two walls of crescent form, inclosing a
miniature valley, through which a small
stream courses down into Rogue river,
with the two southwest points of the
crescent walls near each other. This
stream was once rich in gold, but, like
the many placer deposits in Southern
Oregon, it was long since worked out
and deserted.
The area inclosed within the walls,
is, in extent, about half a mile from
one extremity to the other, and is
nearly round. At the northeast points
of the crescents there is an ojening
through which a bridle trail Icadsdown
;i gentle declivity into the broad valley
below From the formation of the
whole geological structure, known as
Table Rock, it is reasonable to believe
that the walls were once complete, and
inclosed the crater of a volcano. The
waste of time, through the lapse of
ages, wore through the stonv inclosure;
the fire sretrcated back to their subterra
neous home, and a cold stream of wa
ter trickles down where once flowed
fact was well understood hv the Indians
during their war with the settlers in
1S55-6. On the 14th of October, 1S55,
when one of the famous Rogue river
chiefs was hard pressed by the volun
teers, he took refuge 011 Table Rock
and kept his enemies at bay during the
whole day. At night, he escaped with
his hand, after having killed and
wounded several of the attacking par
ty, without losing a man. Fort Lane,
named for Gen. Joseph Lane, was sit
uated a shtirt distance to the southwest
of Table Rock, and the soldiers, while
stationed there, by frequent excursions,
made themselves acquainted with all
the intricate fastnesses of the grand nat
ural fortification.
Hut the incidents we here relate have
passed into history, and the herdsman's
Hock now wanders in security around
the rocky fortress which once echoed
back the w ild warw hoop and the sharp
ring of the frontiersman's rifle.
Pros)critv does lst discover vice,
but adversity doM lt discover virtue.
lieves them from the destructive beat
ing or rubbing, but we cannot say that
it does not rot them: One kilo (fU
pounds) of soap is reduced with a little
water to a sort of pap, which, having
been slightly Warmed, is cooled in 4s,
liters (10 gallons) of water, to which is
added one spoonful of turpentine oil
and two spoonfuls of ammonia; then
the mixture is agitated, The water is
kept at a temperature which may le
borne by the hand. In this solution
are introduced the white cUlhcs, and
they are left there two hours before
washing them in soap, taking care in
the meantime to cover the tub. The
soapy water may be warmed again and
le used OOOe more, hut it will be neces
sary to add half 1 spoonful of turpentine
and another spoonful of ammonia.
Once washed in soap, the clothes are
put in warm water and the blue i applied.
Life in itself is neither good nor evil;
it is the scene of good or cil as you
make it; and, if you have lived a long
day, you have seen all.
It is not enough to have great quail'
ties; we should also have the manage
ment of them.
der to his own lust or ivnrice, or any
other vile passion, and that paper fails
to send out some admonitory voice, and
sound some signal of warning, it is re
creant to every principle of duty and
responslbl lily, and should be stigmatized
by the public it pretends to represent
and to serve.
As a 41 rustler," Samuel, of the Wkst
Shork, has no equal. He came to
town last Weelt Stayed with us one day
soliciting suliscribers to his paper, ami
then bade us good bye with his pockets
so full that then- has been a stringency
in the money market ever since. The
Wkst Simm , however, is a good pa
per, and we do not feel inclined to
grumble la-cause it is so liberally pat
ronized. Rottkurg Independent.
Crops throughout this State are look
Ing exceedingly well, and as the gene
ral prospect at present is that prices for
grain will rule high, w e may expect an
extraordinarily prosjerous vear, com
mencing with the present harvest.
A kiss ought to le a mark of honest
affection, not a WMpOfl of hypocrisy.