Daily capital journal. (Salem, Or.) 1903-1919, April 21, 1919, Page PAGE THREE, Image 3

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    THE DAILY CAPITAL JOURNAL.' SALEM. OREGON, MONDAY, APRIL 21. 1919.
page Tnnr.s
SPLOiDID SERVICES
MARK EASTER SUNDAY
TODAY QrEGO M 'U Auto Go
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Unfavorable Weather Keeps
Few From Enjoying
Observance.
Although the day was ushered in with
XT
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"TUE
STARTS
WED.
4 DAYS
PLAYED 2 SOLID
EOF,
(Continued from page one)
Baar mines, in addition to the loss of Alsace-Lorraine.
It would leave us with
out material. But wo cunuot expect
much from the Latins. They arc not
largo minded.
Franco need not fear German militar
ism. Germany hut no militarism now.
Bsc cannot oven crush the strikes.
Look at Munich. The entente is respon
sible for Gormnny 's future. '1 no indem
nities must bo low."
Asked if German finonciers have any
plan for inducing the workmen to re
lume their posts, since the banks arc
recognized as the backbone ot industry,
Havcnetein replied:
Workman Called Crazy.
"Tho bunks must support tne indus
tries more than ever. They are top
pling as tho result of losses lrom the
Itrikes. Wo have no plans for quiet
ing the workmen. They nre absolute
ly crazy. Their demands are outrage
ous. Wo cainot deal with insane peo
ple. The workmen ask too much. Wag
es nre too high now. Labor is greedy
and avaricious.
"The only thing that will make labor
go to work is need. When that becomes
great they will return to their posts.
It all depends upon tho entente. Tho
Men's Work Shoe
Yes, we have a fine line of them now
in about all kinds.
We can start with the mule skin outing shoe
at $2.45
Elk soles at : .". $2.95
The Elk Outing Shoes
Short lines of heavy black or tan grain, double
soles,to close out at $4.00, $4.50 and $.500
Lion Brand, hardy hide, black grain, bellows
tongue, half double sole, really a $6.00 shoe
for , $5.00
Also oneimilar except Goodyear welt soles at..$5.50
Brown Seamless Comfort shoe, looks well, is
very comfortable, yet wears well, at $5.50
Black, heavy grain, blucher, Jumbo wide
(EEE), welt soles, heavy but flexible. Wide
enough for the very widest feet at $6.25
And one in brown at $7.00
Heavy soled brown solid shoes from $7.00
down to ...$4.50
Brown and tan Army bluchers, welt soles,
$8.00 on down to $6.00
EVERY PAIR WARRANTED TO WEAR
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WEAQT oP WUMAN1ITY
.Allen wolubar'i' Super Production
starring DOR.OTUV PHILLIPS
OregoN
WEEKS IN PORLAND TO PACKED HOUSES
way to settle tho problem is for tho en
tente to give us a quick, good peace,
send us materials and food, and grant us
credit. This would put Germany on her
feet again.
"Wo must have imports to get in
dustry goings We must pay most of our
gold to get food for our people. We
cunnot pay out all of it, however, else
tho mark will drop in value to nocmng
at all. It is thirty pfennigs now. It
will be raised to fifty if peace is fa
vorable and to sixty if America lends
us credit. Then would come tne lung,
slow grind to make the mark reach nor
mal. Must Have Credit.
"Since we cannot pay out the remain
ing l,7(iO.0(iO,OUO marks gold that we
have, the eutente must grant na credit.
Wo cannot expect anything from France
..nd littli from England. Hence America
must lend sufficient credit to resume
trade. The only security we can put
up for credit is Germany's labor.
"Tho country is suffering as a result
of the workmen's wave of insanity.
Tho government must gef away from
socialism. Socialization of our indus
tries is impossible. It would rob Gor
many and her peoplo of initiative and
energy so they could not produce
enough to compete with the rest of the
world.
"We must carry a financial burden
that is rendered doubly heavy by our
s
2 SHOWS EVENINGS
2 SHOWS AFTERNOONS
I discredit our war bonds. They are
mostly held by people of small menus,
distributed through tho school treasury
nuuk cnmpuigns. The banks hold but
few of tho bonds. Annulling them
would ruin thousands, especially since
they aro used as securities by count
less small business concerns.
"Germany's only hope is help from
tho entente, which will enable us to pro
duce tho world wants. At present Ger
many cuunot compete with uther na
tions because .of high wages. Labor s
demands ere ruinous. We will havo
Bolshevism unless peace is made vuick
ly and America comes to our assist
ance. ' '
HUNS GOING
(Coatinued from page eae)
pocted to frighten the allies Into be
lieving Germany will pay no indemni
ties if the Bolshevik; jret control of
the country.
Forniirn nffir Rlnfffnff
This is purely bluff, because the for
eign office has absolutely nothing to do
with Bolshevism in Germany. Neither
can the allies be blamed for present
conditions in Germany, ne N piesent
government is wholly responsible for
irouoie witn tno workmen. Tho govern
ment is deliberately iimorincr tho nnrpsr.
saving it will disappear as soon ca the
allies irrant a fuvorabln iibi. Tho
fact is, Germany's internal troubles
win no more disappear as tho result of
peace th&n thoy faded when It was
announced tnat allied food had arrived.
Most of the German people Say the
present government will not last any
way, hence It threatens in nnlt t nan..
is not made in accordance with German
ideas, it will be an excuse and noth
ing more. It is safe to estimate that
tho majority of Germans ikvor sculpt
ing any pence, but the foreign office
is willing to endanger the entire people
for the snkn nf reviving Pturninflff "in.
dependence" snilitaristieally and capi-
tausucanv.
Radicals Will Accept
The radical., who nrolmlilv would
overthrow tho government in ecse of re
fusal to accept the peace terms, are
ready to siini anv neace and thn rnnVn
capitalists pay the war bill. They have
already developed plana to put this in
to effect. They are enthusiastically
looking forward to early May, antici
pating events will enable them to win
contro and carry out a real revolu
tion. (The radicals anv tWmn t...
not yet undergone an actuij political
and social overturn,) beginning a
spring "house cleaning" with social
ization for the broom and Bolshevism
for the cleanser.
BflttOPW
(Continued from page na)
in small planes, but it will not be
nearly as big a possibility as the over
land routes from country to country.
To do this successfully, the air must
be internationalized, for the benefit of
all countries.
''America is the only country where
this will not apply, for all other coun
tries are too small to keep an airplane
within them. I look for the ost re
markable aero development in Amer
ica, where there are Tast areas on
covered by railroads, or where rail
roads hsxo to go around mountains.
, "I'lanes can follow routes that will
save hundred? of miles and hundreds
of hours, both of which will appeal
to Americans. In addition, Americans
have the energy and capital to de
velop the air route possibilities, while
Kuropean concerns are depleted in fi
nances." Eawh says the Zeppelin people are
expecting Americans to take up the
Zeppelin engine and build factories
to produce it in America. Dirigibles
require a house big enough to enclose
lowering clouds and icy winds, iiasler 1
Sunday was made bright and memorable
ia the church of Salem with a round of
music and appropriate exercises that
lasted from early morning until late at i
night. In some of the rhurencs there i
were sunrise prayer-meetings; there
were the usual early m&a at St. Jo
seph's and holy communion at St.
Paul's church at 7:30.
At the Kirst Presbyterian church
there was an interesting general Easter
program carried out by the Sunday
school at 10 O clock, followed by the
regulur morning service which made us
ually impressive by special music and
by the reception of a large group of
new members into the church. Iu con
nection with this ceremony was the
presentation and baptism of half a doa-
en infaut children. A bountiful vesper
service of solo, quartet and chorus mu
sic whs carried out by the choir at 4
o'clock in the afternoon. The building
was very tustefully ' decorated with
ferns, lilies and other flowers.
Other churches held exceptionally at
tractive services in the evening, those
at the First Christian church being out
of the ordinary as a memorial service.
At tho First 'Methodist church an im
mense audience gathered to hear "The
Hoty City" rendered by the chorus
choir under the direction of Prof. John
Sites. The Taried character of tho long
program made it doubly pleasing, as it
included some of the most noted solo
and chorus numbers in the realm of sa
crcd niusie. Solo numbers wero given
by A. A. Schramm, Miss Margarite Wi
ble, Paul Sterling and Miss Vcnita Mc
Kinney. The organ numbers by Prof.
Roberts were especially fine on tnis oc
casion. You must clean the stomach and
bowels, purify tho blood, each spring,
or you leavo winter a germs and un
pnr ties in your blood and system.
DrivA thorn wnv. ele&n nut thn atom.
ach and bowels bake ITollisrcr's
Kocky Mountain Tea, a spring cleanser
purifier. 35c. Tea or Tablets.
WILSON TAKES HD
IN PRICE DISPUTES
President Urges Railroad and
Industrial Boards to
Get Together.
Washington, April 21 . (United
'Press) President Wilson is making ev
cry effort to effect an agreement be
tween the industrial board and the
railroad administration on the program
of lowering and stabilizing prices, it
was stated at tho white house today.
Befldos .the cablegram Hint the Dres-
ident sent Secretary Bed field and
Uiairmnn Peck of the Industrial board,
urging them to try further to reach an
agreement witt tho railroad adminis
tration, it was learned it hat the presi
dent ha sent instructions o.i the innif
tor to director Uencrnl Hines. the na
ture of these instructions was not. re
vealed .
As a result, however, Hinog has desig
nated Judge iKobert iJ. Lovett to rep
resent him in further conferences with
the industrial board.
The cost of living will itako a b
stantial drop in the near future, mem
bers of the industrial board stated to
day, providing agreements on steel
prices can be reachod with the rail
road administration. It was learned or
tho .board that during the dispute be
tween director llines and Chairman
Peck, which dragged out over two
weeks, informal agreementj have been
reached with some of the largest deal
ers and manufacturers in food, textiles
and ehoes vital factors in the cost of
living. These are the results of a con
ference by various members of the
board ii New York and Chicago.
Representatives of theso industries
have assured the board of their will-,
ingnoss to cooperate in the price re
duction program, in some respects for
mal agreements on the lower prices ex
pected have been reached.
Mcmhera stated tnat lower prices
could be put into effect within a week
providing agreement on steel prices
can be made with the railroad adminis
tration. Doth textiles and shoes show
large increases over pre-war prices.
BIX-HOTJB DAY SOUGHT
Bcottlo, Wash-April' 21 Seattle boil
ermnkers will agitate for a six-hour day
in tho shipyards, if resolutions passed
at a meeting held Sundry bv local 104
are carried into action. The proposed
agreement worked out by Metal Trades
delegates with shipbuilders recently at
Washington, D. C, was turned down at
the meeting.
4VOID COUGHJ1
end COUGHERiT!
Coughing
iurvds
bise
30 DitOM-SlOl'S CO 'CI s
HALT THLT fCR CMLbKLtf
the Vaterland. the world's greatest
steamer and are moro subject to wind
changes. These factors make the plane
tne cheapest and most useful for peace
work.
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-MARY PICKFORD
in
"Cantain Kidd. Jr."
DUD SATURDAY
Orders havo been issued from head
quarters in Portland of the National
guard of Orison for tho mustering out
Saturday next of the four Sulem com
panies, K, F, G, and H, of tao Jf.rst
Reginiont.
This will bo done at tho armory next
Saturday evening at 8 o'clock by the
company commanders. The commanders
aro also ordered to prcpnre all muster
out rolls and discharges for all men.
The muster rolls with all books rec
ords belonging to tho companies and
property of the state of Oregon nre to
bo prepared for shipment to headquar
ters within 48 hours after tho muster
ing out. Thin will include nnuurms
and all equipment, unless somu .pucial
nrrnngements are made.
The general order also states that the
following officers of tho Oregon Guard
are to bo relieved of present Uurtes and
placed on tho nnassigned list: Major
Harvey Wells, Captain J. W. Jones, first
lieutenant Murrv Wndo and sl Lieu
tenant Joseph Richardson of Salem. Al
so Ccptnin K. K. Knbli of Portland,
Captain Ben Sheldon of Meilford and
Captain Denton Burdick, of Richmond,
Oregon.
No orders have been received for the
mustering out of Major M. L. Meyers,
or of the following officers of the Sa
lem companies: Captain A. R. Wil
son, Captain J. H. Arnold, Captain W.
C. Dyer and Caption W. R. Simernl or
c
)
Wednesday
Thursday,
Friday
Saturday
FINAL
("HAITBRS
(and the
best)
of
"TARZAN
OF THE
APES"
MP
1.
Trt
i i iff ' j'-ifj"
MARIE STRAUB DUO
Where Did You Get That Hat
. MUSICAL FLETCHER
Jazzho
SAMMY IN SIBERIA
Lloyd Comedy
CHARLEY CHAPLIN'S
Victory Loan Film
SAME SHOW TOMORROW
Excepting Vaudeville
Stop Itching Eczema
Never mind how often you have tried
end failed.you can stopburning, itching
eczema quickly by applying Zemo fur
nished by any druggist for 35& Extra
large bottle, $1.00. Healing begins the
moment Zemo is applied. In a short
time usually every trace of eczema,
tetter, pimples, rash, blackheads and
similar skin diseases will be removed.
For clearing the skin and making it
vigorously healthy, always use Zemo,
the penetrating, antiseptic liquid. It
is not greasy and does not stain. When
others fail it is the one dependable
treatment for skint roubles of all kinds,
The & W. Rose Co., Cleveland, O.
Lieutenants Entrees, Duncan Corey, Da
vis, Lucas, llemsley or Mitchell.
Second Lieutenant K. H. Choato of
the infantry lns been promoted to first
lieutenant of infantry.
At Independence Inst week Company
K of tho Oregon National Guard was
mustered in, one of tho first new com
panies of the National Guard. Major
A. A. Hall was detailed to be presont
and tnke part in tho mustering in of
the company. J. Francis Drako of Port
land, well known iu the city among mili
tary men was appointed by tho same
general order as inrjor of infantry.
Trans-Pacific Wireless
Congestion Blamed Upon
Facilities at Honolulu
Washington April 21. (United
PrcxsJIMay in trans Paccifie wire
less meiBgei is duo to lack of facili
ties at Honolulu, navy officials said to
day in answer to complaints that Pa
cific const stntions are not operating
to capacity. '
The Honolulu station is several days
behind in its relay work and tho Pa
cifie coast station must wait nntil it
den's its business, officials said.
The reason the rnn Diego station is
not being used Is due, officials ex
plained, to tho fact that the Sun Dio-
go plant is used only for government
and ship messages, while the Snn
Francis. t 'eVfice handled commercial
mutter. The government hopes to have
a uew station opened at Honolulu
shrotly which will speed up despatch
of commercial messages to the Orient.
Sixty American elm trees were plant
ed in Central Park, New York. Wednes
day as a memorial to tho city's heroic
dead.
--
-TleMof
DHiIikiVUIui
. I IHIMUTAI
THE COMPARATIVE VALUE
OF ORDINARY EYE LENSES
AND
BAUSCH kLOMO
is indicated by the above dia
grams. The field of clearly de
fined vision through an ordinary
lens of averago power is repre
sented by an anule of 32 degrees,
while the scientific correction of
PUNKTALS increases this angle
to () degrees IN ALL POWERS.
This means that ordinury lenses
give trul,y clcur vision through
thfl central portions only, whilo
with PUNKTALS such results
are obtained fioin mnigiii to mar
gin. These new lenses are worth in
vestigating. Ank us for booklet
'The Eye and the Lonse."
HARTMAN BROS. CO.
Jewelers and Opticians
N.W. Corner Btate and Liberty Bts.
HERE WE GO!
Wer'e on our way to
Sulem and
YE LIBERTY
"Wjth the biggest thrill of
your life More animals
than a circus. All sensa
tions of the screen in one
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