Daily capital journal. (Salem, Or.) 1903-1919, November 11, 1918, Page SIX, Image 6

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    THE DAILY CAPITAL JOURNAL, SALEM. OREGON MONDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 1918.
SIX
n:
IF M
NOW THAT WE HAVE
Disposed of our
rv Goods
and Notions
We are in shape to take care of your every
want in the Grocery Line
RFMW.R flNF. RF.IlVr.RY A DAY
To a family. Orders Amounting to 50 Cents
or over Mill be delivered fres
56 Bell-ans
l Hot water
Sure Relief
ELL-ANS
FOR INDIGESTION
m mm
i
If It's Produce You Want--
Remember that this store has the largest farmers' trad3 of any siore in Salem,
which enables us to do a wholesale and retail producs business, guaranteeing
our customers the freshest and best produce in the market. We haven't had a
cold storage egg in the store since we've been in busmessartf.. we don't aim
to, as we get fresh eggsmore than we can use Celling to other merchants,
besides shipping some to Portland OUR EGGS ARE ALL CANCLED, AND
OUR SELLING PRICE IS 65c A DOZEN
CUfRiVALS FIRST ONE
IN ITS ENTHUSIASM
Kaiser Is Gives "Last Long
Ride" la Portland Follow
ed By Mourners.
Washington, Nov. 11. Fuel Aiiiuin
tst rotor Gurfielil today lifted ihc order
for liijhtloss nights so that the country
ccuKl have illumination for its vict'ory
celebration.
"WE CARRY POULTRY ALL THE TME
But do not dress it. We sell it, delivered to your dcor, young chickens, per
, pound, 25c; hens, 25c.
i
.4711 V okiiL ..uwa
The Farmers' Store of Quality
270 NORTH COMMERCIAL STREET PHONE 721
Ooturtablas Called Out
' Undon, Nov. 11. (12:10 p. in.)
1 fiiweiul eonstublog were called out, to
day to assist the police in handling tlio
e-nwds celebrating the signing of tho
ntiist'ce.
r.
M.J.B.Coffee
Why?
P
mm
a
MM
"- Ah- .s -s..r .1
Best Coffee
at any price
You can make more cups
of good coftee with less
M. J. R than with any
other coffee.
Ground just right to make
the best cup of coffee.
Blended from the finest
flavored coffees grown in
the world. ,
Thoroughly aged before
it is roasted.
Quality never changes.
It's the most economical.
It goes further.
Vacuum Packed by Spec
ial Process to Preserve its
strength and flavor.
It Reaches You Fresh
Every Can Guarantee
HEAVY DURING WAR
Twenty-Seven Thousand Of
Navy's Personnel Has
Been Killed.
London, N v. 11. Th X'nited Press
was mithoritHtively informed today that
since the beginning of the war British
warships operating off Heligoland in
the ltultic sea and in the sea of inar
nmroa have destroyed two battleships,
two armored cruisers, two light eruis
ers, seven destroyers, five gunboats,
twenty submarines, one Zeppelin and
five armed auxiliaries.
Vessels which reached port damaged,
included three battleships and one light
cruisers.
The Hritish navy from the beginning
of the war has lost from all causes the
following ships;
KIvvpu battleships, three, battlo f mis
ers, ten lumored cruisers, seven light
cruisers, 54 destroyers, six torpwio
bouts, four submarines, 13 mine sweep
ers, four monitors, four gunboats, 33
trawlers and it auxiliary cruisers anil
ten motor boats. Not less than 27.000
of the iinvv's personnel hnvtf been
NAVY TO GROW.
Washington, Xv. 11. Intension of
the American navy will go ahead de
spite the armisicte, Secretary' of the
Navy Daniels stated today.
The llnited Wittes fleet will bear a
heavy share in policing of the world
in the future and must be extended ac
cordingly, the secretary stnted.
Knlisted men, however, will be per
milled to leave the service, tt .
plnined. although they will have en
lijted for definite terms. Secretary
Daniels Mated college men and young
business men who entered the war foi
patriotic reasons and Who desire to get
back into their peace time work, will
Ik given every opportunity to do so a
Smmi Wast Ads Pay
PORTLAND, ORE
W Pay Cash for
CREAM. EGGS.
POULTRY, VEAL
ind HOGS.
Wri t FrioM aW Tick
soon as arrangements can be made.
He made it clear, however, that the
personnel of the navy will have to be
kept cUwe to the present mark and that
recruiting for the merchant marine
must go on at least until further ar
rangements arc made .' '
The mivy has 70,000 men aboard, in
cluding marines, Daniels said.
Work on battleships and larger ves
sets which has been slackened because
of the urgent necessity for patrol and
destroyer craft will be resumed as part
of tho permanent expansion policy of
the navy
The coastwise patrol will not I o de
mobilized at once,, the secretary said
l'lans will not be changed except after
careful deliberation in the next few
days. Contracts for eagle boats may
not be carried through. Delivery of
one hundred was expected by next 'sum
mer. .
Return of marines in France will be
entirely under the direction of General
Pershing, Secretary Daniels said. It
was observed, however, that in the past
marines have usually been the last to
leave, being used as guards.
The war is not over; it is only halted.
Secretary of the Navy Daniels said to
day. It is tho Job of tho navy to carry
it pu for the present.
GOODING AND RYAN INJURED
Geo. X. Gooding wa quite seriously
injured Tuesday while sawing wood
with a power saw. While hearing off
the out wood, the saw struck a piece
he was holding. The stick struck him
in the face, breaking his nose, and
knocking him down. When he fell he
struck the back of his head on a limb
or log on the ground. He is now rest
ing quite easy, though at fiist it wa'
feared that his injury wa$ much more
serious.
The same day .Tas. J?yan was injured
when his team ran away at his farm
near Chanipocg. One leg was broken
when he wa thrown from his wagon,
and the other "sprained. He also, is
getting along as well as can be ex
pected. Aurora Observer.
FRED EHIXN REPORTED
WOUNDED
Work Non-essential Today.
Portland, Nov. 11. All 'work became
non-esseiitinl in Portland today.
I Parades starting from all points of
'the compass met iu a turning twisting
i muss ia the center of the city, all cele
brating the end of the war. Mourners
'passed tliroit!i the streets following a
real casket covered with flowers. On
; it was the inscription: "The Kaiser's
i lust ride."
t Mayor Baker proclaimed a general
holiday.
j Han Francisco, Nov. 11. Wild Is a
.mild word for describing the monster
j celebration held early today by San
IFiftiiei.ii'o in sounding "taps" for Ger
I many and the great war.
! The sounding of air;-.u v. tl bloving
,ofg whistles brought seven. I thousand
scantily clad citizens to the civic center
within half an hour after the news was
announced Blazini bonfires lit up
7-!n Peaks, Telegraph Hill and Seotcn
Hill. Bed flare 'Illuminated the city
J 1ml 1 v!:ero several thousand cheering.
dnghig, excite 1 people gnthored. A pa
rade was' formed and led bv an im-
;piu:uptu band they marched down Mar
ket street.
) ' Haa Francisco has not seen so much
fire nnd f:'r vorks since 1000.
I Sing S'.; . Spangled Banner.
j "Over Then " seemed to complete
; the repertoire of the baud which might
just us well have not been playing in
.the locality a the shunting, jov-stricken
I marchers tasilv drown'd out all its ut
temptsat music," ' The only time the
parade quieted dqwn was when the
"Star Spangled Banner" was played
jaiut then all joined m singing tho na
tionnl anthem.
At Third and Market streets at four
o'clock this morning .tho march paused
i to listen to a French sailor sing one of
Ins country's tavorites. He wus wildlv
j cheered nt the conclusion and forced to
'Blng again. , . .
J There were several parades uuring
the morning, all winding up in the ro
tunda -of tho city hall, where they were
addressed by Mayor Rolph.
The mayor proclaimed the day a
Hominy. .,' i
At five o'clock this morning the
noisy celebrants wore still parading the.
down town districts. Street car sched
ules wore somewhat off this morning
owinz to the halting of cars by the
crowds.
The only hitch was when -sonic one
asked "who won!"
Hospital attendants promise to tell
him when he wakes up.
located at Hubbard.
Tuesday O. W. Frv of Aurora re
ceived 0s vo'cs for the position. L. S.
Calvert at Hubbard received 13. As
neither were candidates for the place
there was no competition for the job.
C'hns. Kinzer wa reelected consta
ble. He received 89 vuteg here and
probably a larger number at Hubbard.
Aurora Observer. .
ROBERT J. COLLIER DEAD.
Hazelwood Co., Front and Anlceny St.
"I For t1u buy ear special
$100 DIAMOND
It's a beautiful Stan and a
nrahlabl invest rmnL Thi
tor U Hmilquu'twa for Military Wmt
WatcaN. Viriuu
JAEGER BROS., (Zi;)ZlZ?
T casualty lieta this week carried
the name of Fred Ehlen of this city, as
among those slightly wounded in
France. It U not positively known
however, whether this jofer? to
wound received in July (but not report
ed until now) or whether it i a second
wound that he has received. It is
known here that after le-ventl week in
the hospital due to shrapnel wounds,
that young Ehlen returned to his com
pany. Hut as all the wounded are not
reported by cable, many being report
ed by slow letters through government
"channels," it is possible this report
may be of tho -wound Ehlen received
in July. Aurora Observer.
XT IS NOW "JUDGE" FRY
For the firat time In many years Au
rora will hare justice of the peace.
In the past the justice has usually been
New- York, Nov. 9. Robert J. Col
lier, editor of Colliers Weekly and pre
sident of P. F. Collier and on, publish
ing house is dead. He died suddenly
last nigh . of a heart a'tack while, he
was seated at his dinner table with Mrs.
Collier.
ill
1
Tlie emptier a mans head
the bigger noise he makes.
1MPERIALES
MOUTMPIXCB
CIGARETTES
quietly speak quality
through their mouthpiece
because they're full of
real quality in tobacco
Appealingly blended.
JOURNAL WANT 'ADS PA1
Contribute through gratitude
ASH Tfij -SCCRETAHY
HOW
ffea "JrSv i ill
His Mother Needed Money
and She Got It!
AN American soldier hurries along the street of a shell-torn
village, keeping close to the shelter of the crumbling walls,
and runs up the steps of a battered chateau.
He climbs to a room where sandbags are piled high to the
ceiling. Behind a rough counter stands a man of middle age -a
man with an emblem on his arm and a smile on his face.
"In a hurry this morning, buddie?" he asks.
"You bet I am," pants the soldier. "We're going into the
trenches at noon."
"Can thelp your;' Vt ' r.'
The boy thrusts one hand into his pocket and with the other
points to a sign on the wall. It reads: 'Send Your Money Home
Ask the Secretary How."
"Can I send this to my mother?" he asks, and draws out a roll
of French bills. . "She needs it." '
"Of course you can," says the secretary. He counts trie money
carefully -twice -and then does a little figuring.
"That makes $$4.60 in American money."
'And will you see that my mother gets it?"
"We will," is the answer. "I'll give you this receipt and I'll
send your money to the nearest headquarters. They will forward
it to Paris, and Paris will tell New York to mail your mother a
check for your $84.60." "
"How much will it cost me to have you do that?"
The answer is it won't cost him one cent His mother will
get the whole $84.60. Every week the Wtf Work organizations
are transmitting more than half a million dollars from the boys
over there to the home folks over here.
Why you shouldvgive twice as much as you
ever gave before!
The need Is for a sum 70 greater than any gift ever asked for since the world
began. The Government has fixed this sum at $170,500,000.
- By giving to these seven organizations all at once, the cost and effort of six ad
ditlSr i campaigns is saved. ' .
ll-tleAs Americans do give twice as much as ever before, our soldiers and
sailors may not enjoy during 1919 their: ,
. 3,600 Recreation Buildings WOO Libraries tupptjtng 5,000,1)00 booki
1,000 MUm of Movie Film 85 Hostess Houses
100 Leading Stage Star 15,000 Big-brother "secretaries"
2,000 Athletic Directors Millions of dollars of home comforts
When you give double, you make surs that every fighter has the cheer and comforts of these
even organizations every step of the wsy from home to the front and beck again. You provide him
with a church, theatre, a cheerful home, a store, school, a club, and an athletic fteld and a
knowledge that the folks back borne ate with him, heart and soul I
You have loaned your money to supply their physical needs.
Mow give to maintain the Morale that is winning te war I -
From the time your fighter starts for a cantonment until
he reaches a front-line dug-out the .seven organizations are
ministering to him in big ways and little ways, to take the worries
off his shoulders and to carry cheer and comfort to him. One aim
-one need-now, altogether!,' ;'
UNITED WAR WORK CAMPAIGN
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