Daily capital journal. (Salem, Or.) 1903-1919, November 04, 1916, Page THREE, Image 3

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THE DAILY CAPITAL JOURNAL, SALEM, OREGON, SATURDAY, NOV. 4, 1918.
SOCIETY
(Continued from page two.)
"Et'sTJine"
; You can't blame the children: for disputing
: about it. ; .... ; . -.
' ' . For it's wholesome, delicious Pan-Dandy Bread, made
, with pure, tested milk. ,. -..
. The older members of the family like it just as well.
ra Pan-Dandy BreadT7
' " Yet though Pan-Dandy is bread that the
most careful housewife could not : better it costs no more
than ordinary kinds.
Get your grocer to send out a loaf today, and note
the difference for yourself. , , . ...
v Fan-Dandy regular size 5c. Big-Dandy
F'' ' 7 the economical family loaf 10c.
Be sure it bears the label n
SALEM ROYAL BAKERY,
240 South Commercial Street
fi' 'Mil1 A
Canital Journal Want Ads Will Get You What You Want
TRY OUR HOUSEHOLD WASH
All you do is iron the starch pieces
We Iron the Flat Pieces
Sc per pound
y ......
Capital City Steam Laundry
Phone 165
P. E. O. club will be entertained at
the home of Mrs, Burt Bower.
Mrs.- Daisy Brown of Ban Diego, C'al.,
iii the guest of Mrs. J. B. Ashby and
will visit in Oregon indefinitely. Mrs.
Brown and Mrs. Ashby arc girlhood
friend a, the former having formerly
lived near Silverton.
Sunday evening a sacred concert will
be given at the Central Congrogational
church. Mrs. Nugent, soprano, and Mr.
Craven, baritone, will be the soloists.
. One of the merriest of the Hallow
e'en festivities was that given by Mr.
and Mrs. H. S. French and their sister,
Miss Jennie Jacobsin, who entertain
ed at their home, 540 North Fifth
street. The decorations for the occasion
were in orango and black, and the
guests who also were apropriately dress
ed in costumes of the same color scheme
wore quaint witches caps.
The . evening was passed with Hal
lowe'en diversions and the prizes were
won by the Misses Bessie Goode and
Fanny Morrison; the consolations fall
ing to Miss Kathryn Morrison ami
Horace Skjff. At midnight the gnyeties
were closed with a dainty supper.
Those present were: Misses Nora
Rerrick, Kathryn Morrison, Clara Page,
Bessie Goode, Fanny Morrison, Myrtle
Henderson, baby Marie French, Messrs.
James Hartwell, Karl Pcarcv, Horace:
Skiff, C. M. Wilcox, J. E. French, Mr.
and Mrs. A. B. Page, and the hosts Mr.
and Mrs. 11. 8. French and Miss Jenny
Jacobsin.
.... j
Mrs. D. W. Eberlin, who has been vis
iting relatives in Salem for a few
weeks, left Friday for Portland, where
she will pass several days en route to
her home in suokane, w asnington.
...
Mrs. P. R. Robertson was the recip
ient of a pleasant surprise, luncheon
on Friday afternoon when several of
her friends gathered at her home on
North Fourth street to celebrate the
anniversary of her birthday. After
luncheon the guests enjoyed an after
noon of music and chatter. Those pres
ont were Mrs. Cora Hawk, Mrs. Kitgcn
ia Worden, Miss Gertie Cappe, Mrs.
Riley Robertson Mrs. Charles Rower,
Mrs.' Cora Cooper, Mrs. Mallisia Wor
den and Mrs. Adin Gardener.
...
t. .1. tfc lf .X. tig Jg Jg
-l 1- 1 T T- T p T -p -p
Bell-ans
Absolutely Removes
Indigestion. One package
proves it 25c at all druggists.
Y.W.C.A.NOTES
All girls of the-junior high schoolB
are cordially invited to be present nt
the Y. V. ('. A. next Monday at 4 p.
m. when clubs for the different, high
schools will be organized.
These clubs aim to help the Social
Service in their philanthropic work.
Every girl will know she is helping
some child to have a Merry Christinas,
and will learn that in giving pleasure
to others she will enjoy the greatest
happiness in the world.
Last Monday one hundred and sev
enty girls were entertained at a Hal-,
lowc'en party and the committee hope
each girl will return and bring a friend
Miss Mabel Robertson and Miss Cath
arine Carson will be in charge of the
Washington high school girls; Miss
Mollie Campbell the Lincoln, and Miss
Jennie Fry and Miss Mae Steusloff the
Grant school.
If any women of the city arc interest
ed in this work and would give ideas as
to what the girls could make that
would be needed they are invited to
be present on Monday afternoon.
The Y. W. C. A. is very pleased to
welcome home Mrs. E. R. Sweet after
a several months stay in the east.
The Happy Hour' club had a delight
ful Hallowe'en social last Tuesday ev
ening and reorganized with the follow
ing members: Misses Edith Bailey,
Louise Moore, Anna Kliewer, Laura E.
Savage, Andrea Tyseu, Alice Conistock,
Luella Patton, Marq Butler, Alicia Wei- j
ty, Murv Gerig, Anna Shrader, Lyda
V. Bell, Lena White and Inga Ostby.
The Y. W. ft A. cooking class will
meet at the association building next
Thursday evening at 7:1.) and will go
to the market of K. C. Cross & Son as
Mr. Curtis B. Cross has kindly offered
to instruct the class on different cuts
of meats. This is a splendid opportuni
ty and any member of the V. W. C. A.
who is interested is invited to join the
class Thursday evening.
Miss Vera Kitchener returned to
Portland today after a six months stay
at the Y, W. C. A. Miss Kitchener has
been the organist at the Oregon theatre
and has accepied a position at the Sun
set theatre in Portland.
Turner Tidings
(Capital Journal Special Service.)
Turner, Nov. 4. F. A. Moore and Os
car Cole are home again.
P. E. Thompson's were over to the
coast for fish Inst week.
The Turner football team is rejoicing
over their victory against Jefferson last
Fridny., They also feel that they have
the good will and fellowship of home
folks, if .the proceeds from the box sup
per counts for anything.
A party of women motored to Salem
on October 31 to hear the Christian
Science lecture-
The Turner women have begun to feel
trie need ot a social club,
MM - 4
i BRICK BROTHERS, Props.
jwujajnw jnca iiuure snu
Cor. State and Liberty Sts.
MOTTO:
Confidence; Every Purchase Guaranteed
I A STORE FOB RICH AND POOR
- - Cash Onlv; No Credit.
PRICES ALWAYS LOWEST
Published every day in this cor
ner during Drcss-up Week, Oct. 29
i to Nov. 4.
EDITORIAL
Brick Brothers Store News
Specialists In Apparel for Men and Boys
Dress-Up Week
Dress-up Week nhould be forever
perpetuated. We should reckon ev
ery week as dress-up week, and make
no exceptions. If every citizen would
dress up all the time and look pros
perous, it would be but a sort time
when prosperity will keep time with
the citizens, which will help the
whole community. We should strive
to make our city and ourselves ap
pear dressed up every day through
out the year. There is nothing more
pleasing to the eye of the man than
a beautifully dressed woman, and
the same applies to the sight of the
woman In a well dressed man. So let
us have more dressed up men and
women. And the place for the men
to become properly dressed up is our
store, for we have the goods aa well
as the lowest prices where style, fit
and workmanship can be had.
Style Show Winner
The living viodel of the style show
w ho received the popular vote is cer
tainly entitled to the crown. She
won -on her laurels aud can well be.
proud of the fact of winning over
such worthy competitors, who were
-the beauties of our city, brimful of
youth, with forms, eyes; hair, com
plexions that are admired by every
one. It will be hard to secure for
future style shows living models to
equal those who demonstrated at
the Oregon for our first Dress up
Week. The writer regrets that his
store does not handle ladies' goods,
for he would have taken an excep
tional pride in furnishing these beau-,
ties with gowns. He envies Fuller
ton's, Shipley's, Stockton's and tho
others who took active part in tho
Style Show. .
v Rainy Day Clothes
We carry complete lines of men
and boys' in rainy day wearing ap
parel. Rain Hats, Coats, Overcoat,
Rubbers. Also Rubber Boots, in fact
everything to protect you from the
rain.
Umbrellas
A complete line of Umbrellas
await your selection for both men
and women. The latest, short or
long handle for tho ladies.
Keep-Warm Clothes
Flannel Shirts for the men folks,
the kind that give warmth during
the cold upcll that is bound soon to
be upon us. Come and get them. '
Men's Slippers f
Don't forget that we carry a cum- T
pleto line of Slippcra for. men.. Cosy T
for the cosy home-',
Jersey Sweaters
Our line of Jersey Sweaters in
Gray, Blue, Marine, nnd other colors
is complete.,, . , .. .
" Mackinaws i
, Our racks are filled. with. the latest
models in all wool Mnekinaws. Only
the best, from Oregon City. J
The Balmede
Did you see the splendid stvle Bill
mede Overcoat at the stvle show t We
carry if, and it's cravenetted (Rain
proofed). Dress Shirts
Our special designeil percnle dress
shirts for men have exceptionally
pretty designs to please the hard to
please.
Commercial Club
Be a booster. Join tho Commercial t
club. Membership open for men nnd f
women who have faith in Snlem and T
its people.
MMtMMMMMM4MMMMMMMM4-MMMMMM4
Miss Hallie Thomas, a Portland tea
cher spent Sunday with her parents,
Mr. and Mrs. R. O. Thomas.
G. F. Booth was a Turner visitor (hi
week. "
Born Monday morning, to Mr. and
Mrs. Archie W. Earl a daughter.
Mrs. H. Lytic has as her house guest
Ruth Kammerzell of Portland. .Miss
Kainmerzell is working for the Lowen
gart wholesale house and ia spending her
vacation with her Turner friends.
. Little Alice Earl has been verv ill.
but Dr. Masscy reports her much better.
M
! John Farris and family motored up
from Salem Thursday evening. '
I Alice Robertson, only daughter of
.Mr. and Mrs. L. W. Robertson lino been
suffering from tonsilitis for the past
week.
Eleanor Moore was on the sick list
the first of the week.
Of all the times and of all the
"spookes", "goblins" and "witches"
, that Turner has ever seen was seen at
I the Lyle home on Halloween night.
I Mr. nnd Mrs. Lyle turned over their
iiinmure store nun mi nierv rl..inii-ti.,..i.t
and private rooms to witches ami black
cats, even the electric lights ii.-uiii. .1
the shape of huge pumpkins.. Woml
stories were told and every one seemr.l
sorry to eat their share of pie beceuso
that meant to bid the hostess good
night. Mrs. Edith Ransom mndo a business
trip to Albany Thursday,
begun to show returns for time spent
and the membership committee is glad
tt. know that new names are hninrr u.i.
. .. . s
mi men mceTing.
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HUMANITY AND YOUR VOTE
In this great crisis of our country I am mora interested in measures than
in men, I am not interested in parties at all. But measures can only be; put
into force through the men in office. We must therefore make a choice of the
man and men who will put the measures in force.
In the first place we should guard against Wall Street influences aguin
securing the control of our Government. They have been rooted out during
the last four years, and they are working hard to get back.
The eight-hour day should be extended to all our industries where possible.
Women should be given the rights which in justice belong to them. For years
the argument has had some force with me that women should be discouraged
from working in factories and Btores, and hence, they have been discriminated
against in wages, but I have slowly come to the settled conviction that this
practice has been unfair, because equal work deserves equal pay. Hence, all
women in our employment who do equal work shall receive equal pay.
I regard war as the greatest curse of mankind that it has done more to
retard the progress of the race and its material well-being than any other
single cause. We want to see war abolished and we believe it can be done,
and we must try to choose the man for the head of our Nation who will do
tho most for these ends.
ALTHOUGH NOMINALLY A REPUBLICAN ALL MY LIFE, I AM
FOR WILSON AND URGE MY FELLOW CITIZENS TO STAND FOR
HIM, BECAUSE OF HIS POSITION ON THESE AND OTHER GREAT
QUESTIONS, BECAUSE HE HAS KEPT US OUT OF WAR AND HAS
DONE MUCH TO BRING ABOUT THE REMARKABLE PROSPERITY
WHICH WE ENJOY, AND BECAUSE WALL STREET IS AGAINST HIM.
He ia entitled to be rewarded for his great service to mankind, and the
only way we can reward him is by giving him the opportunity to be of still
greater service. ,
The greatest rewnrd for doing a good thing is the privilege to do more,
that is why Mr. Wilson wants to be re elected; in other words, to be paid for
what he has done by-the privilege of doing more."
I have much admiration for Mr. Hughes personally, but he is surrounded,
influenced and advised by, nearly all the evil influences of selfishness and
greed which I feel have retarded our progress for so long. 1 fear his election
would restore the old crowd to power and put back the cause of humanity
for fifty years.
In my mind, the most undesirable citizen in the world is the man who
will buy another man's vote and the next most undesirable is the man who
will sell his vtote because he' not only injuries himself and his familv, but tlie
community at large. .
v I AM FOR MR. WILSON BECAUSE WITH A WORLD AT WAR HE
HAS KEPT US OUT OF WAR. ALL OTHER GREAT NATIONS ARE
BEING CONSUMED AND DESTROYED BUT WE HAVE PEACE WITH
HONOR, AND OUB BOYS ARE AT HOME. SPECIAL INTERESTS ARE
DEMANDING WAR AND THE PRESIDENT IS BEING CRITICIZED WITH
MANY WORDS, BUT STRIPPED OF ALL UNNECESSARY WORDS THEIR
REAL COMPLAINT IS THAT HE HAS NOT PLUNGED THE COUNTRY
INTO WAR FOR THEIR PROFIT.
There has been much talk of the attitude of the so-culled "hyphenates."
To my mind these are merely sentimental Americans, men and women, who,
like myself, have a feeling of love for the place of their birtjh. My observa
tion has shown that among the best of Americans are these citizens.
By HENRY FORD
To all these let me say: I know from muny conversations with Mr. Wilson
his absolute neutrality among all the nations nt war, his intense devotion
to peace, his deep desire to serve all tho peoples of all those countries im
partially. Any single act apparently ncainst any one of these countries is
made only in pursuance of his duty as President of the I'nited States nnd his
duty to mankind.
I know positively ho bears no ill will to Germnny or to England, or France,
or Austria, or any of those countries at war, but ho does understand and is
opposing that invisible government, that, unseen hand which caused this war.
I believe those same selfish forces that caused the war are opposing tho
President's re-election.
I AM FOR WILSON because he caused to be passed a largo number of
wise and humane laws, most of which had been promised by tho politicians of
both parties for many years without fulfillment.
Xo one class has been favored, no one disregarded, lie bus served tho
United States as a whole.
Among these laws are:
THE FEDERAL RESERVE LAW, which wpested from Wall Street its
monopoly of finance, released credit forbade usunry and dispelled the fear
of money panics which hung over every business. It fans done away with
the concentration of money in the hands of a few men in Wall Street, aud
distributed it among twelve Government controlled reserve banks throughout
the country. The passage of this law alone, from the viewpoint of the honest
business man, should entitle Woodrow Wilson to re election.
THE EIGHT-HOUR LAWS The eight-hour day Issue has suddt nly sprung
into great prominence.
to
it
tho
hour day
nonr da
say to you from experience and not from guess work, that the eight
day will help both employers and e inployes. We have had the eight-hour
day in force in the Ford factory for nearly three years and it has been
iplete success from every point of view.
I AM FOR WILSON because he favors the eight-hour dav. The President
has declared that ho is in favor of the eight-hour day in all kinds of business,.
except a vtery few in which it is impracticable, as for instance, farming.
The President has been criticised for the passage of the Adnmsnn eight
hour law, which applies to railroads but that law averted the wholesale ruin
which a universal railway strike would have brought. A strike hud been
ordered.' It meant the closing of factories, violence and the enforced Idleness
of millions of persons and the loss of millions of dollars. Neither side to the
struggle took into consideration the one hundred million . people who would
have to bear the burden. Every business man in tho country was trembling
with fear. The President acted as the representative of all the people and
the strike was prevented and the principle of an eight-hour dav endorsed.
Seventy-four Republican Congressmen voted for the hill and no word of
protest came from the Republican candidate, although tho law was under
consideration for sevteral days.
Mr. Wilson showed great wisdom and courage in preventing this strike,
which would have paralyzed the nation.
The Commission which has been appointed to study the effect nf this law
will, I hope, report that with increased efficiency the" railroads will not need
higher rates. But In any case this action Is, I believe and hoM!( the first step
towards the government ownership and operation of railroads.
(Paid adv.)
THE RURAL CREDITS LAW ,i. n.. .. - , ,, .
1 , .. . " "iii.n iiiu lurninr 18 eiiuuieu
bnirow long time loans on small payments at low rates of interest: nnd
lirnnitHPH nn minimi .....Inn- A 1 F.ll ii.'ii mm i . nmi
j , . 7 """"is "i Tiuu,.mu,uuu io runners who were formerly
num-icsa wcriltlH or loan sharks. I'hi.MA fur.il ......1:4. 1 1.. . .
established by the tonini-ssion in various parts of the country.
THE CHILD LABOR LAW, which prevents employment of voung children
111 factories and stops tho coining of dividend out of the lives of' little children
There is no factory and no institution that can possibly give any cure equal to
a mother's care. ' 1 .
A WISE WORKMEN'S COMPENSATION LAW, providing compensation
o hose i injured while n the service of the government, which measure will
lead to ''safety first."
... THB.,.LAW CHEATING THE NON-PARTISAN TARIFF COMMISSION.
which will go into effect very soon, and which has taken the tariff out nf .
politics and placed it in the hands of n commission of different parties, so that
tariffs can be altered as conditions change.
THE GOOD ROADS LAW, which provides 75 OOO.oOn for Improving hi,,),,
ways throughout the I nited States under adequate safeguards, which will
facilitate transportation. This will help the country feed the city.
The farmer will be greatly benefitted by not being compelled to waste
hm. energies on bad roads. Fruits aud vegetables today are rotting on the
farms from lack of good roads.
THE INCOME TAX LAW AND THE INHERITANCE TAX LAW, which
readjust the burdens of taxation, compelling the wealthy to bear a fair share
of the load which has hitherto rested all too heavily on the backs of the poor
THE AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION LAW, which provides nn nni.unl
appropriation for the direct education of the farmer, in order that the farina
of the land may be worked with greater efficiency nud upon a sound and
scientific basis und produce larger crops for tho benefit of nil our people.
THE ALASKAN RAILWAY LAW, which provided a railroad built and
operated by the government, and which has opened up the rnsouiees of that
great territory in the Interests of the PEOPLE, not for the benefit of the few.
THE FEDERAL TRADE COMMI SSION LAW which creates a non
partisan Board to arbitrate commercial disputes, to prevent unfair competition
and to stand as a barrier between the consumer and extortion. '
THE GRAIN ANTI-GAMBLING LAW, which provides better grain
storage facilities, and enables the fanner to obtain certificates on which loiuis
uiny be secured. He is thus enabled to borrow on the products of his Inbor
nnd is not compelled to sell during unfavorable times.
THE SAFETY-AT-SEA LAW, through th passage of which ships now
carry more life-saving equipment, and the general living conditions of sailors
nt. sea have been improved.
THE COTTON FUTURES LAW, which prevents gambling in cotton in
slock exchanges nud establishes standards for cotton. 1 hope the President will
find some way to pass a law to prevent all speculation in slocks,
THE CLAYTON ANTI-TRUST LAW, which does innv with interlock
directorates, prevents railway looting, ends the abuse of the injunction Bml
declares the great truth that a 'Man's lubor is not a commodity but a part of
his life." .
THE ABOVE RECORD OF PROGRESSIVE LEGISLATION in the
interest of all the people and not of the few, far excels any over before known
in our history.
THOMAS A. EDI80N SAYS THAT PRESIDENT WILSON AND HIS
COLLEAGUES IN CONGRESS, BOTH DEMOCRATS AND REPUBLICANS
HAVE ENACTED MORE LAWS FOR THE BENEFIT OF THE INDU
TRIOU8 PEOPLE IN THE PAST THREE YEARS THAN THE REPUBLICAN
PARTY HAS IN ALL THE TIME IT WAS IN POWER; and it is because of
these laws and his leadership in the interest of all the people that the
President is being fought by the special interests, by overv master of Wall -Street,
every nioiioKlist, every munition muker, every man with a special
interest to serve. No business man should oppose Wilson because Wilson is the
greatest friend honest business ever had in the White House.
GREAT PROSPERITY COVERS THE LAND AS NEVER BEFORE
LEGITIMATE INTERPRISE IS A8SURED A PROPER REWARD. THERE
ARE NO BREAD LINES, AND EVERYBODY'S EMPLOYED THAT WANTS
TO BE. OUR PEOPLE ARE CONTENTED, PROSPEROUS AND HAPPY.
WHY 8HOULD WE MAKE A CHANGE?
In order to carry out his work President Wilson will need the co operation
of a Congress thoroughly in accord with his own far-seeing policv. It is our
plain duty as voters to send back to Congress the right men, Irrespective of
party, to assist the President in the great tasks that face him,
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