Daily capital journal. (Salem, Or.) 1903-1919, May 29, 1916, Image 4

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    Ed
Page of "Th
uonal
MONDAY KYKNINU
Mav ?., li'R
e Capital
CHAKIES H FISHtR,
Editor and Manager.
i Journal
PUBLISnr.D EVERY EVEXIXli KXt 'EPT StXD.VY, SALEM, OHEGOX, BY
Capital Journal Ptg. Co., Inc.
L. 8. BAliXES, C HAS
l'resident
II. nSHKTI.
Vice President
Di Ht A 0. AXI)Ri:sEX,
Sc. mid Trcas.
Sl'1'..Sl'IiII'TJOX EATES
Daily bv carrier, per yoar $".0u Tor month
Daily by mail, per year o.oU
l'i
Illulltll ...
4.1c
..3."c
JIM fflUAST OF
(Continued From Page One.)
FUEti LEAKD WIKK TKUXIIiAPlI KKI'UKT
EASTERN REI'll ESEXTATI VES
New York, Ward-Lewis-W'illiaina Special Agency, Trilnine PuiMing
The Capitul Journal carrier boys are instructed to put the papers on the
porch. If the carrier does not do this, misses you, or neglects gettitng the
paper to you on time, kindly phone the circulation manager, as this is the only
mtj wo can determine whether or not the carriers are following instructions.
Phone Main til.
THE WEAKNESS OF COMMISSION GOVERNMENT
The death of James J. Hill this morning removes from!
the stage of action the world's greatest constructive rail-j
road man. His highways of steel invaded wilderness andj
deserts and transformed them into empires which in turn'-
paid tribute to his enterprise and genius in the form of i li0,kn'oCKl, -"y- --ft hi father v
l i . . . . i , ! , , larm in Ivio ami entered steamboat '
largt; aim certain uivutenus. uiner ranrcaas awaited sot-1 i Si r-;.,,i.
tlement and development, Hill preceded it, and his vision
of the future seldom failed of realization. His strong,
nigged character appealed to real American sentiment
and "Jim" Hill long ago became in a way a national hero
and the wave of popular resentment against railroad
I'-in ,.1't'ii in SI
niaineil ten years,
lie was urirricd
iTheiea Mchcgui.
in !07 to Mmv
About this time
Hill ivitt elf . tin' ftll. nM, iransiior-
Inlion lnwiucs s : m c in I it'c lit' the
firm of J I i II. (!iim.'s and company.
In Wil he c?lalli.he.l the l.'ed iiivcr
, - - . , " , . itm.-Mji iui inn ruiiipiwiy uperaiio lie-
management, uui suilieuillcs bwepi LUC COUniiy SeemeU,iee m. raul ami vYinncpcg. Tliice
never to affect the esteem in which the greatest of rail-l-vears '"ter, ,1L' sul,l.i,i iterest i.. xVt
, , ., , , , , , . . ,, ... con.-oru ami urgum.eil a symlrcute ov
road builders was held by the people, especia ly of the! which he obtained control of the m.
vner 5Pfrinna u-riipri vvpvo tha crono r.F Vii'c. n-vnotnctl " 1,1 '''"V"' riiilnind. T.ns
aii w . v. .. i w . . ..I . r niLii . . t i v kVLllV, j ILXO gltUlVOl
activities. His death will be mourned as that of no other
man among all the great captains of finance this country
has produced.
'4
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,1
i vs.
i
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The delegates to the general conference of the Meth-
Denver. Colorado, a citv aDnroximatelv the size of I odist church refused to change or modify its rules as to
Portland having tried the commission form of govern-! dancing, card playing and theaters. This has caused
ment for four years abandoned it almost unanimously at; some criticism but why should it. This is a free coun-
a recent election. The reason was that it cost more thani try and every person in it has the right to belit
the old kind of rule and gave less results. The same seems
to be true of Portland, and it may be expected that in the
near future the Oregon metropolis will either go back to
the old style of city government, or make some radical
changes in the present form.
Commenting on it the Oregonian calls it a "headless"
government, and points out the reasons why it is mr re
costly and less satisfactory. Among these reasons it gives
one, which also lies behind almost all the departments of
cityj state and county government, not only in Oregon but
in all the states, and also in the general government.
That is the tendency for each department or public in
stitution to magnify its importance, and to extend its
utilities.
The fish and game commission, for instance, would
keep adding to the things it was organized to do branch
ing out as experience showed where something might be
done to better protect game, adding new birds, new ani
mals and liew men to look after them.
The state fair board naturally wants to make a good;
showing and acting in perfect good faith adds this and
that to the attractions of the state fair. The railroad
commission, established to regulate railroad traffic, sug
gested the regulating of other public utilities and this was
done to such an extent that even the name of the com
mission was changed to make it fit.
The Oregon agricultural college established for me
purpose of advancing that industry has been added to un
til there are so many other things in the curriculum that
the name is a misnomer.
Our public school system follows along in the same
lines. Not many years ago the fundamentals alone were
taught. Reading, writing, arithmetic and above all spell
ing, was about all there was to it. Now we have Latin and
Greek, German, music, arithmetic, and even a teacher to
show the youngsters how to play.
We have a small army of special game officers and ap
paratus for taking pictures of beast and bird as a part of
the game protection barnch of state government.
These things did not come all at once like the measles,
but were the gradual growth due to the tendency of each
department or institution, to consider itself the most im-l
portant branch ot government and entitled to generous
support.
This is not said in the way of fault finding with things
as they exist. If the people want this kind of thing and i're
willing to pay for it, that settles it. It is merely a sugges
tion as to the evils that necessarily fasten themselves on
any form of public uility that being a law unto itself is
so far as supervision by he state is concerned, ''head
less." It is what makes the commission form of govern
ment unsatisfactory to cities, and what makes the com
mission way of running the state's affairs, an ever in
creasing expense.
The commissioners are honest and generally capable,
but they act without regard to the other state affairs, and
have their horizon bounded by the reach of their work.
They naturally think their work a state necessity above
all others, ami cannot see why the other commissions
should also be provided for until everything they need, or
think they need, has been supplied.
Oregon has dozens of commissions and boards, each
having a head, but the combination of all of them is head
less. The subject recalls a story in the old readers of 50 or
GO years ago. The word "Acephalous" was given in the
spelling lesson, and in those days the spelling was done
orally and the definitions were also required to follow the
spelling of the words. The youngster who got the word
to spell had not paid strict attention to where it quit and
the definition began and the result was this: "A-c-e-p-h,
aceph, a louse wihout a head." That is what is the mat
ter with the commission form of running public business.
she pleases on any subject.
ight to believe as he or
It is a matter that is no one's
business outside of those belonging to that church. It is
a church regulation, and applies to none but that church's
members. The conference did not attempt to prescribe
what others should do. Had it done so, those who do not
belong to that church would not have taid anv attention
to it, any more than they will make their conduct accord j u""',,,
look the fact that if those other folks were not at liberty to
think for themselves, in this big country, the critics would
be bound by the same rule.
The London dispatches bring the sad intelligence that
Great Britain is astonished and indignant at remarks
made by President Wilson. The remark that stirred the
ire of the rabid ones was that the warring nations were
not amenable to the ordinary standards of responsibility.
As they so fervently assert they are responsible it makes
the demand on them that they cease interfering with
American mails so much the more imperative. They had
better heed it tao, or the rpesident is liable to make a few
remarks that will make them still angrier.
reorganized under Hill's uenius luu'
became known a- the St. I'a'.il, Mima-j
apclis ami Manitoba railroad cumj.jny '
Built Great Northern ' !
Hill officiated as general manager,!
vice president and president of the!
road until it was merged with the I
rent Northern system in I !.. Hilli
then' directed the liuihiiiit: of the:
ireat Northern, extending from Lake
Superior to i'u'ot Snuii.1, with nurtn
ern ami southern branches jnd a linel
of steamers runninjs to the Orient. i
Hill was president of the (ireat !
Northern until IH07 and c'liairman i.l'j
its boaid of ibrector?, until in-j
was nl.su president of the Northern Se-j
rurilicu romianv, n iliiecloi of scon,!;
raiU'oad systems and a nur.ii er ofi
Ii.iiiIik, -'lid viir, priMiki.t of tin- Nevi j
V irk Chamber of Cuninier.i!. j
Une ot the tinest i-olk-i-tinns of in ml
cni French oaintiiifis is in the Hill
also interested himself
ud was the author of sev-!
eial works touching on transportation
problems. One of tae best known is
"Highways of Progress.'' I
The history of Hill's life is the his-
u
3d
(TMVE me hospitality befo' the soup
U an' a pipe a' VELVET after the
pie an' it don't matter much about the
rest o' the meal. .
Tuesday Graduating exercises with
address by Dr. h'noch Albert Bryan,
ex-president of Washington State col
lege, followed by college inspection.
The pageant exercises will be par-
I ticipated in by every woman student
I of the college, w ith characteristic
torv.of development in the north -.est.
bitty years ago he was a dock clerk in
At last that little dab of one thousand cords of wood
which Portland has been worrying over is a mystery no
longer, and fortunately the city does not lose it. It seems
that the wood was never cut, and only existed through a
generous measurement like that in the celebrated Mis
souri case where a coon skin was used as a measure and
for now it of course loses nothing. The wood having
never been cut did not exist so Portland never had it, and
never having had it, it necessarily follows that it never
lost it.
costumes designed and made chiefly
by themselves. The special band anil
'orchestra music for the occasion cost
St. I'aul mid practically penniless. lie:''1'"1.1' the. "hr0 ('"st ?'
dieil a multi-millionaire. ir'"""""" ",c monies win
Hill's parents were plain, hard work-j rem;h almost 1.0(i0, all of which is
ing Scottish and north of Ireland stock!'""! lor, out.lf the I'l'Oceeds.
Hill wanted to be a great surgeon. His , . . . , 'argest in tne
wi.siui. hi iiil- iiiMituiiou, numiiering
25 receiving degrees as follows:
Bachelor of science. 2H; master of
science. IS; pharmacy, 2; and music,
1. In addition 34 vocational stiolunts
BETTER THAN CALOMEL
Thousands Have Discovered Dr.
Edwards' Olive Tablets are
a Harmless Substitute
iainer s neatn wnen lie was ntteen
years obi blasted that hope. '
When he entered the fuel .ind trv.s
portation business for himself he 'sim
ultaneously became station master of
St. I'aul 's only railroad.
Steamship Line to Orient
Lord Mount Step'.en, Lord Strath
cona and Norman W. Kittson formed
the trio which pnrchesed the Minnesota
and l'acific railroad from Hutch bond
holders and put Hill in charge. This
road, running between St. I'aul and
Minneapolis, was the foundation of the
great Hill lines.
The (Ireat Northern was orgaai ed
in lss.4 to merge all branches and feed
ers in I iiineupolis and the Dakota.
The same ye.tr- Hill pushed the line to
ward 1'uget Sound and the ore prodnc
ng regions in northern Miniic.-oa.
The organization u steamship coni-
the tail was thrown in. This is a good thing for the city,:s,.,'tu,. JnlhJxt t.., m"a?.
rcer. in the meantime he put through
the Northern Pacific, which is another
line connecting St. I'aul wiih the coast.
Needing a line between Chicago and
the coast. Hill bought the Iiuriingtou
route in l!Hil. lint the Nurthorn Se
curities company organized to control
the three roads, was dissolved ns il
legal. The (Ireat Northern purchased its
subsidiary lines in 1PU7. Expansion
was the keynote of Hill's life, l.ouis
Hill replaced his father in active di
rection of the railroad interests in 1!'12.
James J. Hill's children are James N.
Hill, Mrs. A. M. Bard and Mrs. Michael
(laviu, of New York: Mrs. George
Slade, Mrs. Kniil Boeckmann. Miss
flam Hill and l.ouis Hill, of St. I'aul;
Walter Hill, of Hallock, Minn., and
Mrs. Samuel Hill, of Maryhill. Wash..
l'hysiciuns declared that Hill would
have survived his illness but for his
great age.
Hill's activity continued right up to
the last and he held a business confer
ence on his death bed. Realizing that
his illness would probably prove fatal,
the aged financier on Sunday called
several railroad officials to his side
and instructed them regarding the dis
position he wished to make of several
pending matters. He nlso conferred
with two bank officials. One of the
last gigantic deals-in which he par
ticipated was the allied loan.
Hill was one' of the close personal
friends of the king o'f Belgium and did
everything in his power to assist the
king and the people of Belgium.
The funeral will be held af'2 o'clock"
Wednesday afternoon from the Hill
residence on Summit avenue.
The weather is all right only we should adopt the
English idea so quickly aped by the Portland schools, and
manage it with the clock system. By turning the almanac
back about two months the weather will be found just
about what it should be.
The fact that England thinks the United States favors
Germany, and that Germany believes it favors England,
is pretty conclusive evidence that this country has been
fairly neutral, and has favored neither.
From the success the weatherman has made recently in
guessing the weather, those in charge of the rose carnival
at Portland should induce him to predict rain for the en
tire event.
Political prophets are pretty generally giving the -e-publican
nomination for the presidency to Hughes. They
may be right, but Bwano Tumbo is still on the job.
' March came in like a lamb, but it is an open question
yet how it will go out. So far there is no indication of
lamblike propensities.
mil receive cerniicates or protieiency
in their severnl vocations.
One and one-third railway fares
have been granted over the tn'ain Ore
gon Hues, and arrangements have been
made to entertain the largest crowd
of visitors that ever has come to com
mencement at O. A. C.
When you want the best society
printing call on The Capital Journal
Job Department.
Dr. Edwards' Olive Tablets the substi
tute for calomel are a mild but sure liixa
tive, and their effect on the liver Is almost
Instunianeous. They are the result of Dr.
Edwards' determination not to treat liver,
ami bowel complaints with culnmel. Ilia
efforts to banish it brought out. these littwi
olive-colored tablets. i
These pleasant little tablets do the good
that calomel does, but have no bad afier
effects. They don't Injure the teeth lika
strong liqulils or calomel. They take holil
of the trouble and quickly correct It. Why
cure the liver at the expense of the teeth?
Calomel sometimes pluys havoc with th
gums. So do strong liquids.
It Is host not to take calomel, but to let
Dr. Edwards' Olive Tablets take Its place.'
Most headaches, "dullness" and that
lazy feeling come from constipation and a
disordered liver. Take Dr. Edwards' Olive
Tablets when you feel "Iokkj'" and
"heavy." Note how they "clear" clouded
brain and how they "perk tip" the spirit
At 10c and 2Dc per box. All druggists. j
The Olive Tablet Company, Columbus, O.I
FiTljtfttr home atmosphere with exquisite lasting fragrance
ED. PINAUD'S LILAC
The great French perfume, winner of highest international
awards. Each drop as sweet and fragrant as the living Lilac
blossom. A celebrated connoisseur said : "I don't see how
you can sell such a remarkable perfume for 7S cents a bottle" and
remember each bottle contains 6 oj;. it is wonderful value Try it
Ask your dealer today for ED. PINAUD'S LILAC. A-'r 10 cent's
our Ameruan offices will send you a testing bottle. Write today.
rAlUi.TlhKIJS ED. PHAUD, Dept Si , ED. PDiAUD Bldg., New York M
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Ripp!m$RhumGS
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COMMENCEMENT CALENDAR
AT 0. A. C. JUNE 2 TO 6
...-" vn r ;'i
6, ' ' 'W
Home
Woman an
ank
r if
LADD Si BUSH, Bankers
Established 1SG3
CAPITAL $300,000.00
Transact a General Banking Business
Safety Deposit Boxes
SAVINGS DEPARTMENT
TOWN AND COUNTRY
The flowers are blooming in the woods, the daffodils
and kindred goods, the cowslip and the rose; and, as I do
my office taks, I wish that I could go and bask among such
mings as tnose. un, it would surely be sub
lime, upon a fragrant bank of thyme, for
drowsy hours to rest; to revel in the whole
some breeze, and pluck the toadstools from
the trees, and rob a hornest's nest. But
now a farmer comes to town a man whose
residence is down where buds are bathed in
dew; all day he sees the poises grow, all day
he feels the zephyrs blow his flowing side
boards through. And when I'd talk, in
burning words, of bumble-bees and bats and
birds, and other woodland things, he looks
at me as though he feels that my fat head is full of wheels,
and cranks and rusty springs. He interrupts my ghd
harangue, and says, "I do not give a dang for cowslip or
for rose; I'm happy, when the sun goes down, if I can
chase myself to town, to see the movie shows." .
I '-V' Sv.. V
' ,A
Commencement rxereisps nt the
Oregon Agricultural college, June " to
S, will lie held on tlic different days as
follows:
Friday, .Tune 2 Pugpant of sea
sons nnd Kttssian fete day. with recital
of music graduates in the eveninj.
aturday. (Alumni day) Alumni
luncheon and business meeting with
reception of President ami Mrs. Kerr
to graduates and alumni, with annual
reception in the evening.
Sunday Baccalaureate sermon. Dr.
Luther B. JJyott. of Portland, with
union church services in the evening.
Monday, (Class day) senior trreak-i
fast, class meeting, dedication of class j
memorial, class day exercises, inspee- i
tion of college, regimental gradua-!
tion parade, music festival, with senior
play in the evening.
Every clay the homa and the bank are
S coming into closer alliance through tlic
maker of the home woman.
We want the women of this community to renfeH
the meaning of an association with this bank.
We want to co-operate with you in your home finances
and your personal finances.
You can consult us about your financial matters, know
ing that your affau-3 will be held in strict confidence.
You can put system Into your finances through the
helps we offer.
An account here and a check book will start us off
nicely. Little things about business which perplex you
will be explained as you go along, and we will do the
part of a good bank In helping you in the conservation
of your resources.
This is your invitation make
this Bank your financial home
1 UNITED S TATES NATIONAL BANK
Member Federal Reserve Banks,
Salem, Oregon
Clears Complexion
ron't worry about skin troubles. You
ran have a clear, clean compleiion by
using a little zemo, obtained at any drug
stem for 11V, or extra large bottle at
Jl.tKX
Zemo easily removes all traces of pim
ples, black heads, eciemn, and ringworm
and makes the skiu clear and healthy.
Zemo is neither watery, sticky nor
Kreasy and stains nothing. It is easily
applied and costs a mere trifle for eaih
application. It is always depeudahkv
Zemo, Cleveland.
Always Watch This; Ad ChangesIOften
Strictly eorrt weight, .o.nr iaj M fcigh9,t prica. for .11 kindi of
junk metal rubber, hide. M ,. x pty k -Big
itock of 11 uze econd h.nd incubator.. All kind. eorS
Iron or both roof, .nd building.. Boofing m LZ
linoleum.
H. Steinback'Junk Co.
Tb Hoqm of Half . Millioa B.nrml.,,
502 North Commarcuvl 8t
PiOLO III
A .
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