Daily capital journal. (Salem, Or.) 1903-1919, September 30, 1915, Page FIVE, Image 5

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    .THE DAILY CAPITAL JOURNAL, SALEM. OREGON, THURSDAY. SEPT. 30. 1915.
FIVE
A Wonderful Array Of
Women's and
Misses'
Coats
Priced from
$4.95 to $50
We meet all mail order
houses' prices. See our
wonder coat at $5.95
THIS IS A GREAT
SPECIAL
You will be extremely
pleased with all our values
TRY SALEM FIRST
v. v
LIVES ARE LOST
AND PHOPERTY
DAMAGE IS GREA
I
News Coming In Slowly From
Storm Stricken Territory
of New Orleans
W. P. Now Laying Rails
South of Siuslaw River
Eugene, Or., Sept. 30. The work of
laying rails on that portion of the Wil
lamette .Pacific grade just south of the
Hiuslaw river was started this week,
according to Ralph Moody, attorney
for the Southern Pacific company, who
lias returned from a trip to Mapleton
and Cushman, in company with Engin
eer II. P. Ilocy, in charge of construc
tion. '
The big bridge ncros9 the Siuslaw
will now permit the crossing of con
struction trains so ,that the rails may
be laid past Tsiltcoos Lake and as far
as Lake Tahkenich, where work on a
long trestle is now in progress. After
the track is laid ballast trains Will be
started out of the Natron pits.
Mobile, Ala., Sept. 30. Thousands of
dollars of dutnnge and several lives lost
ere the estimated results today of th
tropical cyclone which swept New Or
leans yesterday. Wireless communica
tion with vessels outside the city were
the means available. These vessels
said the storm had died down in the
city, and has turned northeast wii
diminished violence.
Lake Fonchartrain was reported six
feet over its banks, flooding the coun
try for miles, while residents fled for
their lives into New Orleans. . The delta
dikes are reported to have crumbled at
many points. Trains are marooned, and
sorvice has halted between hero and the
crescent city.
Mobile escaped without serious loss,
though the waves lashed over wharves
:ind d:.maged 'evrul buildings.
The death toll is believed to be the
largest in small cities along Lake Pon
chartrain . and the Mississippi. Miln
burg and other New Orleans suburbs
were reported under water. A long lane
trestle was reported swept away be
tween Bay St. Louis and New Orleans.
New Orleans is without light, tele
phone or trolley service. Oue of the
big railway carbarns is reported to have
been toppled over by the hurricane
whose velocity rouged from 90 to 130
miles an hour. A number of houses, too,
crashed into ruins.
Fears were felt for rue Southern Pa
cific Protesus, known yesterday to have
been in the center of the storm. The
revenue cutter Tallapoosa had ths liner
by wireless yesterday morning, but sud
denly this communication ceased.
Much Property Wrecked.
Shreveport, La., Sept. 30 Five to ten
killed and much property wrecked was
the reported toll in the New Orleans
hurricane, according to advices reaeb
ing here before wires were prostrated
by the storm. -
AH wire and train service with Now
Orleans and the Louisiana-Mississippi
eoast district went out last night. !
The Peavy Byrne sawmill at Kidr,
La., waa destroyed by fire with a $0,
000 loss, -white the gale threatened to
spread th. embers and wipe out th
town.
The Texas Pacific has annulled its
service to New Orleans beeause of the
danger of crossing the Mississippi.
The Vieksburg, Shreveport & Fa
eifio railroad dispatchers lest Vieksburg
after a message from there said an east
bound passenger train had been delayed
two hours at the crossing because of the
high wind.
Tan Reported Killed.
Beaumont, Texas, Sept. 30. Beports
filtering In today over crippled wires
from towns outside storm swept New
Orleans indicated that the West Indian
hurricane which hit that city Tuesday
night and yesterday killed ten persona
injured more than 100, and destroyed
more than 1,000,000 worth of property.
Direct communication with the city
ia shattered, but reports declared the
telephone, light and trolley systems
were shut off, the Masonic temple,
many schools and churches were badly
damaged. Warnings by the weather bu
reau were credited here with having
saved many lives and much shipping.
Peoplo fled into hotels or locked them
selves securely in their homes, while
shipping men saw to it that vessels rid
ing in the harbor were securely anchor
ed. Hence only smart crafts suffered
from the fury of the storm.
The force of the hurricane can he
gathered from the foot that it swont
through the city at a t:.!p of nearly 130
miles an hour, accenting to wireless
reports.
Washington, Sept. 30. The weather
bureau todav was unable to communi
cate with New Orleans, through it
usual channels, but Imped to be nble to
establish wireless communication before
night.
Increased Price of "Hop"
Drives Fiends From Frisco
San Francisco, Sept. 30. The in
creased price of hop due to the passage
of the Harrison act, March 1, has driv
en 5,000 "dope fiends" from San
Francisco, Secretary Zeh of the state
board of pharmacy said 'today.
On the streets and in the dens of
San Francisco cocaine and morphine
are selling "for 50 cents and tl.OO a
"shot," where they sold for IS cents
and 50 cents three months ago. Opium
has becomo a luxury among its user,
rising from $30 a tin to $t0 a tin.
Driven by their cravings, thousands
of victims of the drug are flocking in
to Loa Angeles, where "hop" is some
cheaper because it can be more easily
smuggled into this country, via Mexico,
Secretary Zeh said.
OF
SCENOF CONFLICT
British and Moslem Battle On
Site Made Famous by
Fall of Man
By J. W. T. Mason.
New York, Sept. 30. A most import
ant victory for the British has been
gained in Mesopotamia in the heart of
the territory iu which German states
men planned to mnke future colonial
expansion in Asia. When the English
capture Kutsxel Amara, on the road
to Bagdad, they made proDable the fall
of the Arabian Nights city before the
nd of the winter, tlerniaiiy'a ambi
tions, therefore. In this most fruitful
region must disappear .unless the Ger
mans gain concessions in the peace con
ference after the war.
vThe Turks are demoralized and in
sore need of munitions, though they
outnumber the British. Tho Germans
at Constantinople "have been prevented
from reiuforoing Mesopotamia or they
would have done so long'ligo. , A fresh
Turkish army was sent out after tho
British had crossed the legendary situ
of the Garden of Eden, whore the Tigris
and Euphrates join. They attempted
to make flank attack from the west, but
were routed in July when their ammuni
tion was exhausted.
BEAKS RAID MARKET.
Josh Billings Said
"EARLY IMPRESUNS ARE THE MOST
LASTING : THE FIRST KISS AND THE
FIRST LICKING CUM UNDER THIS
HEAD."
-FIRST IMPRESHUNS" OF A STORE
ARE ALWAYS LASTING.
So we endeavor to have our store attrac
tive and modern; to have our clerks court
eous and prompt. To make the first impres
sion of our store as nearly correct as
possible.
We have the best lines of Ready-to-Wear
Clothing, Hats and Furnishing Goods in
Salem, and we want everyone to know it.
New Suits $15-20-25-30
Winter Overcoats $15-20-25-30
Latest Fall Hals $2-3-4-5-6
FJorsheim Shoes $5-6-6.50-7
Hammond-Bishop Company
Leading Clotheirs
Nfw York, Sept. 30. Following on
the heels of bull activity for several
days past, the bears today raided the
market, and sent prices tumbling. Sell
ing was heavy in an excited market.
A partial recovery had set in by after
noon, but not before, many weak
speculators' accounts had been wiped
out.
Tho market closed irregular.
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WHEAT ADVANCES TODAY.
Chicago, Sept. 30. September
wheat jumped 11 points today iu
the pit before closing, hitting
$1.15 1-4. Because of delayed
shipments due to bad weather,
the shorts were caught and had
to buy heavily to meet contracts
today, the settlement, day.
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"THE TOGGERY'
167 Commercial Street
Plans to Make Study of
Northwestern Apple Crop
Washington, D. C, Sept. 30. Com
plying with numerous requests from
the growers' councils, chambers of
commerce,, growers' and shippers' or
ganizations in the slates of Washington,
Oregon, Idaho, and Montana, the office
of markets and rural organization of
tho United States department of agri
culture b.n made plans to establish
temporary headquarters in the north
west for tho study of the distribution
of the .1015 boxed npplo crop.
Tho plun as outlined is bused upon
assurance that the office of markets
and rural organization will receive the
co-operation of all those interested in
the apple industry, for without this co
opcralion the efforts of the office
would not produce valuuble results.
It is probable, that the field head-
quarters for this work will be in Spo
kane, 'because of the accessibility of
that point to the apple territory in the
northwestern states.
The work which the office will do i
not that of a telegraphic market news
service, but rather contemplates the col
lection by mail and the compilation of
dnta and issuance of weekly bullctinn
concerning tho shipments and destina
tion of tho northwestern boxed apples.
In this connection similar work will bo
carried on to a certain extent in tho
apple section of Colorado, Utah and
California.
A Y?
II V I II
HrZJV
MAKES A SPECIAL BARGAIN PRICE OF ONLY $2.75 PER YEAR
FOR MAIL SUBSCRIBERS ONLY
i
Since this is the time when most people are arranging for fall and winter reading matter, the publishers of the CAPITAL
JOURNAL have decided to make a special bargain price of $2.75 a year, good untill October 15, 1915.
In addition, as a premium, we also give free with every yearly subscription paid in advance at $2.75 a year, McCall's
Magazine one year and your choice of any pattern free.
We want to introduce the DAILY CAPITAL JOURNAL into new homes, and take this method of doing it. We give no
expensive premiums, and run no automobile voting contests.
Our policy is to give the subscribers the direct benefit of the lowest subscription price of any daily published on the
Pacific Coast.
THE CAPITAL JOURNAL is a complete newspaper your neighbors who already take it will tell you so. It has a full leased
wire telegraphic news report, gives the most readable war news, covers the news field of the Central Willamette Valley better
than any other newspaper circulating in this territory. If you have not received a sample copy, send for one and it will be
mailed to your address promptly.
THE CAPITAL JOURNAL has the best newspaper printing plant in Oregon outside of Portland. Come in and see it when
you are in Salem an examination will convince you. It spends the most money for gathering news and has the best facilities
for that purpose.
OLD SUBSCRIBERS may take advantage of this special offer by paying arrearages up to date and $2.75 for one year
in advance.
THIS OFFER IS GOOD UNTIL OCTOBER 15TH
But you should send in your subscription at once, and begin getting the news and
entertainment the CAPITAL JOURNAL will, give you at once. Help us build up a great
paper in the Central Willamette Valley your assistance will be appreciated.
Remember, the price is $2.75 a year, with McCall's Magazine and one pattern
free.
CAPITAL JOURNAL PTG. CO.,
SALEM, OREGON.
GENTLEMEN: Enclosed please find $2.75 for which
send me the DAILY CAPITAL JOURNAL one year' with
McCall's Magazine one year and one pattern free as a
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