Daily capital journal. (Salem, Or.) 1903-1919, September 25, 1914, Page SIX, Image 6

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    six
TMi DAILY CAPITAL JOURNAL, SALEM, OREGON. ITtlDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, l'JU.
Lineup of Germany 's Big War
Lineup of British and French Fleets
OF. FIRST BATTLE
OF THE
I Priest Tells of German Brav
ery in Charge, and of
British Pluck
-rf.
THE N-J
piPAf GRAPHIC STORY
1 IWVi
BRITISH J"&y&- , 63
0
5
GERMANS KIND TO
BRITISH WOUNDED
Gives Direct Lie to Charges of
German Atrocities and
Cruelty
0
I A s J "
- J I ff s
V
JMAGDEB
Hamburg
BEJ
IN
r. ,v.
J1 V?nnRLEfl2
. . -
2
25
SflKBiVBBnamfi'n
WAR FLEET OF GERMANY.
D., Dreadnought; 1 B., Tint Class llattle
hip; B. C, llultle Cruller.
HIGH
Name of ship.
F'rlch der Groase
FIRST
nstfrlrtland
Helgoland
Oldenburg
Tfiuerlngen
Naiaau
I'oaen
Illielnland
Wemfalen
Total 164.0UO H
SECOND SQUADRON,
neutichland 1S.040 I B. 4
I'ommirn 13, OM
Sch'wlg-Holateln 13,040
Vchlealen 1J040
Hanover 13.010
HeMen i;,v7
Preusaen Yittl
Lothrlngen 1I.II97
SEA FLEET.
Ton- No.
name. Type, gune.
24.810 D. JO
SQUADRON.
E'.f.OO n. 11
n.
n.
n.
i).
n.
n.
u
J2.M0
22.61
2'.'. 500
IS, 000
Jl.tillO
18,lXni
11.609
12
Cali
ber. 11 In.
11 In.
11 In
13 in.
11 In.
11 In
11 In.
11 Ir
11 In
1 U.
1 H.
l n.
i ii.
i ii.
1 B.
i a
Total
I1.1M
THIRD SQUADRON
Kalter 14.310 L.
Kalaarln I4.H0 I).
P. Regent L'pold. Jl 510 1).
Koanlc Albart.... 14.110 L.
It In.
11 In.
II In.
11 in.
11 In.
11 In.
11 In.
11 In.
II In.
11 In.
11 In
12 In
Total 47.240 o
BATTLB CRUISER SQUADRON.
Seydllts 24.40 B. C io 11 in.
Moltke 12 640 B. C 10 11 in.
Uoeben 22,640 B. C 10 11 in.
Vun dar Tann.... 11,700 U. C I n n.
Total 4,620 u
RE8ERVE SQUADRON.
Wlttelabach 11.611 IB. 9.4 In.
Braunschweig ... 1S.W7 la 4 n in.
Klaai 1S.4J7 I It 4 u In.
iiaelirlngen 11,411 1 a 4 1.4 In.
Total 49.S1J (
In addition, to the above, the follow
ing have beeu assigned to the different
squadrons:
Battleships and Dreaduoughta
Brandenburg, Woerth, Knlser Frled
,.ileh, Kaiser Wllhelru, Kaiser Karl dcr
Uruixe, Kaiser Wlllielm der Grosse,
KalHr llarbarossa, Wettiu, Lotbrlugen,
Mecklenburg and Schwalien, making a
total of thirty-Ore battleships.
Coital Defense Vessels Siegfried,
Reowulf, Frithjof, Ulldebrand, Ueltn
rlall, Hagen, Odin and Aeglr.
Hattle Crulsera Fuent Bismarck,
Prini Helnrlch, Prlni Adalbert, Frled
rlch Karl, Roon, Xorck, Bcnarnborst,
tlnelienau and Bluecber; total battle
crulsera, thirteen.
Protected Cruisers Coalo, Kalaerin
Augusta, Kreya, Ilertha, Victoria !
Ie, Vlneta, Hansa, Irene, Trlnzets Wll.
helm, Oefron, flela, Oaielle, Nlobe,
'jmphe, Amaione, Ariadne, Medusa,
Thetis, Vrauenlob, Ancona, Undine,
Hamburg, Bremen, Lubeck. Uuenchen,
I-elpiig, Damlg, Koenlgsberg, Stutt
gart, Nuernberg, Stettin, Dresden, Em
! den, Eolberg, Augsburg, Mains, Bres
! Isu, Uagdeburg, Straasburg, Karls-
ruhe and Itoslock. furtj-thrce protect
ed cnihors In nil.
Unprotecteil Cruisers Seomller. Gey
er, Condor, Cormornn, litis. Jaguar,
I.uclis, Tiger, 1'unther 11 n1 Klier.
Klvcr (in 11 bonis - Taingtmi, Valor.
Inntl nml Oiler; nlso ninety-nine du
stroyers ready at the close of 11113.
FLEET TOTALS.
Total
Ton- No. proj
naip. gntia Wright.
flltn saa flrt 46. ;a lit KI.H'iO
lieserTa squadron. 49.214 14
11
180,110
Total 61 4.!:i7
Germany has been building ships
rapidly during the past teu years In
1904 she had only 10 battleships a
against 'M today; 4 battle cruisers
In 11M.M and 13 of this class now; 17
protected cruisers ten years ago as
nKiiltist 43 of this class today. In l'.KM
Germany had only 37 destroyers, but
now has 141 of this class of vessel. In
V.MH tho personnel of the kaiser's sea
force numbered 38,000 men and todny
numbers ueurly 70,000 actives and 110.
000 reserves. Three new battlehlps
and two battle cruisers have been
launched within the year and will
shortly be In commission.
The visit to American waters In 1911
of a German fleet, led by the great bat
tle cruiser Moltke, said by Germans to
be the fastest armored craft In the
world, directed the attention of Amer
icans to the nuvy of the fatherland, n
navy which bad been built up out of
practically nothing to a place among
the first three navies of the world, (nit
which had never been called upon to
withstand the test of battle. Exactly
what Is the German unvy worth? That
question has long been the principal
preoccupation of the admiralty of
every country In l'.nrope and of son
fighting experts In Washington hrrdly
less. It lias been racking the brains
of the persons who are supposed to
keep track of the balance of sea power
ever since the Germno warships' build
ing program caught the attention of
rival powers some years ago.
At that time the German fleet rank
ed far down tu the list But It was a
very short time before the kaiser's
naval program, as thoroughly Teutonic
In Its rigid orderliness and economic
system as the organization of his armv
corps, placed Germany ahead of all
countries except Great Britain and the
United States.
Slowly, steadily, the German fleet
crept forward toward the first rank
among the world's navies. It la true
that up to within a couple of years
ago American battleships were In Indi
vidual power probably superior to
those of Germany, but Germany, with
Jealous eyes turned on her principal
maritime rival, England, saw the algn
of the times and set out to build gigan
tic battle cruisers like the Von det
Tann and Moltke anil swift Dre-d
noughts like the Oldenburg.
As early as 1SH7 the Germnti war of
flee had mapped out a scheme for s
fleet of sixteen Ironclads and dfty
smaller vessels, to cost $i",,oilO.Oo6
Hut this scheme was hardly more than
started when the hostilities of the
Franco-Prussian war or 1S70 broke
out. Such ships as were In the water
were wholly unable to face the strong
French sea force, though In the one or
two small actions that were fought the
Germans did not discredit themselves
From this time on the German navy
expanded very slowly. The first mod
em first class warships were laid dowu
In 1800, about the same time the Uult
cd States was beginning to experiment
with battleships. These early battle
ships of the German navy were known
as the Brandenburg clafs. They had
about the same displacement as our
Oregon, and they were. In a sense, an
anticipation or the all big gun type
of line of battle ship In use today. In
asmuch as they carried main batteries
of six eleven-Inch gnus, two more big
guns than were carried by warships In
other navies.
Apparently the all big gun battle
ship did not appeal to the German na
val authorities of the early nineties,
for In the next class of battleship to
he built, the Kaiser class, the armament
was shifted to a lighter basis, con
sistlng of four 9.4 Inch guns and eight
een six-Inch. From this time until
about a year ago there was not a bat
tlesblp In the German navy that car
ried a heavier gun than one of eleven
Inch bore. Although other navies were
arming their ships with the twelve Inch
and lu our navy the thirteen Inch gun
was used twelve years and more ago.
the Germans stuck to the eleven Inch
Kven their first Dreaduoughts of the
Nassau type were equipped with elev
en Inch guns. The first ships to carry
the heavier pieces were the super
Dreadnoughts of the Ostfrlesland class.
It was In 1900 that the present pro
gressive building program for the navy
was Instituted lu Germany, partly In
consequence of the anger aroused
among Germans by the seizure of the
German steamship Bundesrath by a
British cruiser on the coast of Africa
on charge of carrying contraband
of war to the Boers, Under the spur
of the public Indignation and the ap
peals of the emperor the relchstag
passed so extended naval defense act
under the terms of which It wan pro
posed to spend $224,000,000 on con
struction snd $100,000,000 on dock
yards. With this money. It wss antic
ipated, Germany should have In 1017
a fleet of thirty-eight first class battle
ships, wltb a proportionate number ef
cruisers and other smaller vessels.
Xew Y.nk, S..pt. Itev. Father
.lames .Ma Hoy, 11 native of Trenton. X.
I., who lias been in Xew Zealand for
ninny years, arrived here toilay on the
steamship Mainetiinia from Kurope. lie
fore oiii) to Xew Zealan.1, lie live.l in
Nan Francisco. Father Malloy spent
J nineteen days on the liriiiK line with
British troops and probably knows
: more about the actual fighting in
Kurope than any one hitherto returning
to the I'nited iSratcs. He was in lindon
when war was declared.
"On August 17," Father Malloy
told the I'nited Press today. "1 was
invited to accompany the British ex
pedition as chaplain. We sailed August
It. I was assigned to a transport
carrying General Sir John French to
Fiance.
"Seventy two transports were re
quired to carry the expedition. We
landed at Boulogne. Three days later
we went to Mon and beiuine the left
wing of the French army moving
north to relieve and aid the Belgians
and to prevent the capture of Xnmur
and Brussels. We went into uctiou
August -2.
"The British left wing was coin
prised of crack British regiments and
totaled l.'O.nilll men. For the next two,
days they fought continuously, lioth
day and night.
A Forest of Men.
"The Germans seemed uncount
able. There seemed to be millions of
them. As they swept down on the
British they resembled a moving for
estall gray-green and hardly discern
ible until well within raiiee. One
! could well imagine that the entire
horizon was filled with a swift- ving
mass.
; "As we advanced, the German field
I artillery shells kept exploding with a
terrific concussion, breaking great'
holes in I lie atmosphere nml making it
j difficult to breathe. Their bands were!
: playing and the soldiers were singing
;"!ie Wncht Am h'hein'' and other
a i rs.
"The Germans charged at top speed.
But the poor fellows, never had a
' chai The British were well en-
tienched. The enemy advanced in
mass formation. Our rifles were the
best in the world and the marksman
ship of our troops could not be sur
passed. The Germans were doomed:
from the outset.
"Steadying their rifles at the top
of the trenches, the British fired at
will. They couldn't miss. Kvery bul
let found at least two marks and some
times three or four. The poor fellows'
fell like chaff before a fire. Whole
companies fell together. The. wounded
squirmed from the masses of the dead
and tried to continue the charge. It
then became necessary to shoot them
again.
Not War, Juat Slaughter.
"The siehts I saw showed me con
clusively that this is not war, but a.
terrible holocaust. Its cost in human
lives is almost impossible to conipre-'
hend.
! "The rifle slaughter was varied with1
slaughter by the bayonet. The Ger-
I man attacks persisted and the British ;
charged thoin. It was the most des
perate hand to hand fighting, but in-i
I variably the longer knife of the'
British bayonet prevailed.
" Wlnlo the British were snccne.liitir
the French were being defeated by the
Hermans on our right. They were nn-1
able to hold the enemy, and' their rifle i
fire was almost as bad as that of the'
Germans. j
"Finally the British were ordered,
to retire in order to prevent being en-!
veloped. When these order came the!
men almost rebelled. Stalwart Irish'
and Scotch soldiers wept openly. At
several points the British soldiers,
actually leaped from the trenches and.
charged the enemy in their eagerness!
to emphasize the fact that British sol
diers should not retreat.
"Thoir officers finally explained
that it was necessary to retreat and'
trap the Germans.
Rifles Are "Humane." j
"The German shell fire was tre-'
niendoiis almost indescribable. There!
was a small hill with a company of
British soldiers entrenched there." A
German aviator flew above, and sig-j
nailed the rouge. A number of shells!
were dropped and the hill disappeared.!
In its place was a great hole filled I Natal
with dead. i
"A notable thiug is the large pro-i
portion of the wounded over tho dead.)
"Tho modern rifle is humane. l
have seen many men wouuded in what'
are ordinarily "called vital spots, taken
to hospitals and return to the front i
within a week. j
"After we reached Marno we began
to advance so rapidly that the Germans!
were unable to cover their t.'neki. As;
a result we were ahle to- if t an idea!
of the terrible slaughter. Tin grO'Ki.l
was covered with British, French and,
German dead. There was no time to
bury them. We found hundreds ot"
wounded in houses. 1
"I want emphatically to deny stories:
of German atrocities. Thev eared for.
PuTHv A lit0
In the map A indicates Dreadnoughts, B Battlehips and C Battle Cruisers and Armored Cruisers.
WAR FLEET OF GREAT BRITAIN
D.. Drearlnoueht; I B., First Class Itattle-
lilp; n. C.. Battle Cruiser; A. C, Ar
mored Cruiaer; t, C, Protected Cruiser.
FIRST HOME FLEET.
Ton- No. Call-
Name ot ahlp. nnre. Type. funs. ber.
TH FLKET FLAOSHIP.
iron Duke 25.1)00 U. 10 M I In.
FIRST HQUADRON.
Colllna-wood
Colossus ..,
tierculeg ...
Nptune ...
St Vincent.
Superb
Mai Iborouch
V anfuard
19.2.0
20.000
20.000
20.000
19.250
1MU0
a.ooo
lf,2f,0
IX
I).
D.
D.
r.
D.
1).
D.
10
10
10
14
10
10
10
14
total 11, 10
8KCOND SQUADRON.
23.000 a 10
Ajai
Audacious
Centurion
Conqueror
Kins Georga V
Monarch
Orion
Thunderer
23.400
23.0(10
12.500
13,004
22.604
........ 22,600
12.100
D.
D.
D.
D.
D.
D.
D.
rotaj 112,000
14
10
14
14
14
14
14
14
dwar
Africa
Britannia
commonwealth
Dominion ...
Hihernla
THIRD SQUADRON.
Hindustan
iCealandla
16,(00
14. 404
16.100
14.404
16, 404
14.S04
16. 600
14, W0
1 a
1 B.
1 B.
1 B.
1 B.
1 B.
1 B.
1 &
l'otal 1S2.0C4
FOURTH SQUADRON.
Dreadnotifht
Hallerophoa
Temeralra ......
Asamemnoa ....
17.900
11.600
11.604
16,404
D.
D.
D.
1 B.
14
14
14
4
11 In
12 In
12 In
12 In.
i: In
12 In
13 A in.
12 in.
11 1 In.
13 1 In.
IS 4 In.
U.4 In.
Ill In.
116 In.
litis.
H i In.
IX lM
12 In.
12 In.
12 In.
12 In.
12 In.
11 In.
11 In
12 In.
11 In.
12 In.
12 In
Russell
CorunHllta ...
Allie iimrle ...
iJuncan
Kxmouth ....
Lord Nelson..
Vengeance ...
Total
SECOND SQUADRON.
,. H.OoO
1. I4.UU0
,. 14,0(10
. 14 iHig
. H.lM)
. Hi .'Ul
. !M0
. W.4M
1 n.
1 B.
I M.
1 14.
1 It.
I 14.
I 14.
12 In
12 In.
12 III.
12 in.
i; In.
I: 111
12 In
FIRST CllUISKH Syl'ADRON.
i'urr.arvon I0.S..0 A C. 4 7.S In.
Liverpool 4 Mil) l'.C. 2 t In.
Bi iatol 4,no P.C. 1 6 In.
I' Hlinou '.h ........ 6, a I) P.O. 1 6 In.
Total 74,744 14
FIRST BATTLE CRUISER SQUADRON.
1-ton 17,000 B.C. I 11 4 In.
Queen Mary 17,000 B.C. I II I In.
Princess Royal.. 17,404 B.C. I U.B In.
New Zealand..., l,8W) B.C. I U In.
l'otal It.100 n
SECOND CRUISER SQUADRON.
Shannon 14,(00 A. a 4 1 1 In
Achillea .......... 11,660 A C. I 4.2 In.
Cochrane 13. 14 A.C. I 4.2 1
............ 12,610 A.C. I 4. Jin.
Total 41.30 n
THIRD CRUISER SQUADRON.
Antrim 10.164 AC 4 7 1 In.
r'll 10 4 A.C 4 7.4 In.
Roiburha ...... 14.K4 A.C 4 It In.
Devonshire ...... 14.444 AC 4 1.1 la.
Total ............. 41, 44 14
SECOND HOME FLEET.
FIRST SQUADRON.
Queen 14.404 IB. 4 11 la.
Prince ot Wales H,44S II. 4 4S la.
Bulwark ......... 14,444 IB. 4 11 In.
London 1I.444 IB. 4 11 in.
Formidable . 14.444 IB. 4 ilia.
InaBlacaMo 14.(04 1 B. 4 121a.
IrreetaUWa ..... 14,444 IB. u In.
VenarsMe .MM. 14; 444- IB, - 4 Utn.
Total ............J,404
Total a,7i)0 16
SECOND CliL'ISER SQUADHON.
Drake 14.100 A.C 1 4.2 In.
Hood Hope 14 1H0 A.C. 2 S.2 111.
Kins Alfred 14.100 A.C. I 9.2 ill.
Sutle) 12.000 A.C 4 9 2 in.
Total 14.000 I
THIFtD HOME FLEET.
lUattlwhips only Included.!
Mateatle 14.W0 I H. i 17 It
Masnlflcent 14.914) IB. 4 12 In.
Mar . 14.900 1 B. 4 12 In.
Hinsrtieus ........ 14,9(10 1 B. 4 12 In.
Jupiter 14,104 1 H. 4 12 lu.
Hannibal 14.9u) I B. 4 12 In.
aefar 14.9C0 IB. 4 12 In.
I'rlnca George.... 14.9M) 1 B. 4 12 In.
Victorloua 14.9CO IB. 4 12 In.
Albion 12.940 IB, 4 12 In.
Canopua 12.K0 1 a 4 12 In.
Glory 12.90 IR I 11 In.
Goliath 110 1 II. 4 Yl in.
Ocean - 12.9(4 IB. 4 11 In.
Total 194.414 44
MEDITERRANEAN FLEET.
FIRST SQUADRON.
Inflexible 17,260 B.C. 4
Invincible 17.260 B.C. 4
Indefatigable .... 14,760 B.C. I
Indomitable 17,264 B.C. I
Total 70.600 41
SECOND SQUADRON.
Defence 14.600 A.C 4
Black Prince 19,660 A.C 4
Duke of Ed'b'cn. 13.6&0 A.C I
Warrior 13,640 AC 4
j Total ft, 34 a
THIRD SQUADRON.
Gloucester M 4.M P.C I
Chatham 6(00 P.C I
Dublin I.4W p.c 1
Weymouth 4.2oO P.C I
Total 20,440 24
In addition to Hie lighting shipH
iiimiierated ulmve the British tuny
maintains a proportionately huge licit
of smaller fighting vessels, torpedo
boat destroj fis, torpedo bouts, gun
boats, coast defense ships, coaling
ships and oil tank vessels, mine Inyeis,
submarines, etc. Of torpedo boat de
stroyers, small, speedy vessels good
for lighting off torpedo boat uttacks)
on the larger nulls of the fleet mid for
expeditionary work, she h.is 101, n it Ii
thirty-eight more building at the be
ginning of 1914 Hhc bus 1()'J torpedo
boats, with none under construction;
twenty-eight torpedo vessels nud one
building. Klght scout ships are lu com
mission. In submarines now lu actlv
ervloe she tins sixty-four, nine lexH
than France, but the Intter power, In
alliance with Great Britain, has ouly
eight under way uie the British run
oetun twenty-two.
WAR FLEET OF FRANCE
FIRST SQUADRON.
Ton- No.
-Name of ihlD. nait T
v.uui uei vi m
Jean Hart :: mo
Condorcet n.m
Danton 1MV4
Diderot 1,024
Mliabeau llWig
V'ermlaui m.024
Vrttalre H.ojs
IX
O.
1 H.
1 B.
1 H.
1 B.
1 8.
1 B.
Cali
ber. 12 In.
12 In.
12 In.
12 In.
12 In.
12 lu.
12 In.
12 !n.
Total
.....1S4.3C1
12 In.
12 In.
12 ll.
12 In.
41 In.
4.2 in.
9.1 In.
1.2 In.
4 In.
4 In.
4 In.
4 In.
ARMORED CRUISER SQUADRON IN
AMERICAN WATERS.
fNormallv viart At 41r fl ... i
K" 9.900 A.C 14
Suffolk ........... 4.140 A.C 14
Berwick .......... 4,400 A.C 14
Lancaster ........ 9,104 A.C 14
Total ............. 91X4
TOTAL ALL BRITISH
4 In.
4 In.
4 In.
I In.
FLEET.
Tonnage.
747.400
X94JM
Flrat Home
SeOf)S IVtoma
Thtr Heme. M
wiiwraneaa .......... 146,440
Anertcaa watere...,.,.,,,,,,. n M
TetaJ t-im ..m.. 1 tit mo
Patrle
Itepubllaue
Verite
Juutlce
Demociatle
SECOND SQUADRON.
Total
. 14.(36
14,436
14.436
. 14.436
14,(136
73.L6
1 H.
1 B.
1 H.
1 B.
1 a
CRUISER SQUADRON.
Wald'k Rousaeau 13 7M
Edgar Qulnet 13,760
Ernest Kenan.... 1S?7
Jules Ferry J2.361
Leon (Jambetta.. 12,351
V Ictor Hugo 12,361
A.C.
A.C
A.C
A.C.
A.C
A.C
12 In.
12 l,i.
12 In.
12 In.
11 In.
1.4 In.
1.4 in.
7 6 in.
7.4 in.
7.4 In.
7.4 In.
Total
74.040
RESERVE SQUADRON.
St. Louis II. 1M
Gaulols H.iog
Charlemagne .... 11,10s
Camot 11.964
Brennua 11,100
Suffren 11.627
Maaaena, 11,731
Jauresulberr ... u ai
Jeanne d'Aro umi
Jules Mlchelet.... 11,170
Charlea Uiri.l... 11
Marselllaiaa v
Glolre 4.K4
1 B.
1 B.
1 a
1 B.
1 a
1 a
1 B.
1 B.
A.C
A.C
A.C
A.C
A.C
I
I2!.
11 In.
11 In.
It In.
12 In.
11 In.
11 In.
12 In.
14 In.
7.4 In.
11 In.
1.4 In.
7.4 in.
Tetal ...
.447 434
FLEET TOTALS.
No.
Tahiib..
lirat aeuadron ium m
Second atmadron... 71.K 44
cruiaer squadren.. 744 -44
Beeerve auaeren.. 147.M4 44
VI pre),
weight.
- 4,4te
,
- I,K
4i)
--4M4S
(Coitinucd on Page 8.)
- 441,711 194
1
Tetal