Weekly Oregon statesman. (Salem, Or.) 1900-1924, September 02, 1904, Page 6, Image 6

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    You Are T.'ever T.Jflil ; At Yourself
When Barr does your repair work, becaue he knows how it should Le
done, and does not have to ask' you to take your watch or clock and if
it dot b not run all fight bring It back."
I f you Lave an agate you want
It to
THE MARKETS.
LIVERPOOL,, fpt. 1. Wheat,
Dee., 7 5-4 D.
- New York, 8-pt. 1. Silver 57-8;
tTnioa Pacific 9S 1-2; PM. 03.
Chicago, Sept. 1. Dec. Wheat, open
ed 108 5-8; closed 109 1-8; Barley 43-52;
Flax 11 1-2; Northwestern 123 1-2.
Ran Francisco, Sept. 1. ' Caah
Wheat 1.45.
Portland, S?pt. 1. Wheat Walla
Walla 7; blueatem 82; alley 83. Taeo
Dia Wheat Llaesteni 83 club 78.
Local Markets.
Wheat 75 cents.
Oats 1.15 per cental.
Barley Feed, $21 per too.
Hay Cheat, $11 clover, - 10$llj
timithy, $13.
Hour City retail selling price, $1.05
to $1.15 per s'ek.
Mill J'eed Bran, 22 per ton; short,
$23.50.
Butter Country, 186720 eents (boy-
Jdr) ; .-.
Egs 20 eeotf. .
Chickens 8 cents.
flpringers 10 ftU.
Pork Fat hogs, 85; stock, 4 e.
Beef Fat steer i, 1050 to 1250 lb,
2fa24e; cows, l(o)iy4e.
Mutton Choice wethers, l2e per
pound.
Veal 5ri5 cents.
Hops 232S cents. -
Potatoes New, 70 to 75e per bushel.
BALFOUR, GUTHRIE & CO
BUYEUS AND SHIPPERS OF
GRAIN
DEALERS IN
Hop Growers' Supplies
FARM LOANS
WAREHOUSES AT
TUIINISK, MACLEAY,
PRATUM, BROOKS,
SHAW, SALEM,
. SWITZERLAND
Manufacturer of "Royal" rioar.
J.G.
AGENT
207 Commercial Street, Ealcra
PEGGING AWAY
THE STATESMAN'S SUBSCRIPTION
CONTEST GOES ON, WITH
PROMISED ACTIVITY.
-
There Will Be a Great Deal More Do
ins in a V cry Short Time, and the
Closing Will be Well Worth Watching
as the Holidays Approach.
There in bound to be a great deal
more interest inthe Statesman's 1904
Hubscription Contest shortly. Some of
the friends of the contestants have tak
en supplies into the hop fields, and they
will be reporting soon. And when hop
picking is over there will be more ac
tivity iaeunng new subscribers, and
more votes. As the end of the contest
approaches, it will become still more In
teresting. It may seem a little slow
just now, during the rushing harvest
season; but the excitement of the clos
ing will surely make op for all the sum
mer dullness. , '
Following is the present standing of
the contest;
Miss Pauline E. Remington.. .. 10485
Miss Edna Wilson, Mscleay ... 3710
Miss Thelma Durbin,, Tangent. 2975
Miss Mary E. Davidson, liberty 2625
Dean Witsel, Salem 2000
Cleavie Shields Gervnia ..... 1525
Miss Beatrice Shelton, Salem . . 1105
Miss Opal Hehnkea, Salem .... 900
Miss Jessie Reed, Aumsville . . . . 850
Miss Nettie Beckner, Salem ... ; 840
Frances Kremis, Polk county 650
. Miss Margaret Mulkey, Salem.. 500
Miss Clara, Jones,' Brooks .. . . 500
Mrs. Cal Patton .... .... .... 375
Miss Willow Pngh 325
Miss Orletta Kraus, Aurora "..';. 225
Mrs. John Batt, Salem .... . . . . : 200
Miss Minnie Ireton, Liberty .... 00
Miss Opal Hatch .... .... ... ' 175
Miss Grace N. Babcoek, Salem.. 300
Miss F.va McAllister .... ..... 100
Robert Whitney, 'Hubbard .... 100
CASTOR I A
For Infanta and Children,
fa tti Yti Kin Atajt C::jU
Bears the
Cguatuxa Cf
Legal Blanks, Statesman Job Office.
mounted or a diamond reset, take -.
Cor. State and
Liberty Sts.
4
THEY BROKE
iTHE RECORDS
THIRD OF THE 1904 OLYMPIAN
CONTESTS TESTERAY.
WORLDS FAIR GAMES FAST
Four Records Aro Smashed During the
Day In Athletic
! . Sports.
Two Americans and a Greek Divide the
..Laurels of , the Sports One Record
Lost by Unfortunate Accident at the
Last Hurdle.
ST. j LOUIS, Aug. 31 . Today, the
third of the 1904 Olympian Contests,
one World Js record fell before i the
prowess of an American, three Olympic
recor b were broken, the laurels going
to two Americans and a Greek. One
Olympic and World's record was brok
en, but owing to im unfortunate acci
dent, time will not be allowed in the
latter.
II. L. Ilillman, of the New, York Ath
letic Club, ran a 400 meter hurJle in
3 2-5 seconds under the Olympic and
World's record. Ilillman -was forced
the entire distance by Frank Walter, of
the Milwaukee Athletic Club, who fin
ished f second, and in the excitement of
the race, Ilillman failed to clear the
last hurdle cleanly, and the barrier fell
to the ground, 'disqualifying bis Tecord,
bat not affecting the result of the race.
The 200 meter run again brought out
the field record breakers. Halra, '
the Milwaukee Athletic Club, won th
first heat in the record time of 22 1-5
secends. He fought the distance with
W. J, Cartmell, of Louisville, Ky., and
only won by inches.
The final heat resulted in lowering
the Olympic record by three-fourths of
a seeil by Hahn.
Perikles Kakousis, of Athens, Greece,
had everything his own way in lifting
a bar bell. Kakousis won the event by
lifting a weight of ISO poia.nl. Ka
kousis then went after .the Olympic
record, which is also regarded as a
World's record, lie firHt lifted 200
pounds, and then the weights were ad
jastod at 256 pounds, four ounces more
than; the. record made by the Punish ath
lete V. .Tenoen. at Athens, in the Olym
pic in 1896. Ralph W. Ran, of the
Chicago Athletic. Association, played
havoc with the Olympie and the
World's records ai the 16 pound shot
put. His first essay buried the Olympic
record and came within two inches of
the World's record. He tried twied
more lxfore he succeeded in breaking
the lattor with' a. put of 4S feet, nevcn
inches, lienting the World's record by
tw inches and the Olympic, record
by nearly two feet.
LIBERTY -ROSEDALE BO AD.
Improvement League to Meet There
Tonight to Discuss Railway
Extension.
The Ro3edaIe Improvement .League
will meet at Rosedale tbU evenkig to
consider, among other things, the pro
posal made by Mavor F. W. Waters the
other .lay for the construction of thJ
street car line exxiension ,in mat iia
trict. It is sai.l that the proposal has
met with much favor and that there
seems to be no reason to doubt at all
that the line will be built. The people
of Rosedale and Liberty are of the
sort that make improvements and they
want to see their district go ahead and
will do all they can to make it go
ahead.
It is said that some there who have
large tracts of land are willing to do
a great -deal if the line will pass near
enough to them to give their lands the
facilities of depot or stopping places.
That the building of the line "will do a
great deal towards the opening of theoe
tracts of land cannot be doubted at all
and there is no question that the con
struction of the line will add thousands
of dollars to the valuations in that 'dis
trict.
Has Sold a Pile of Chamberlain's Cough
j Remedy.
? I nave sold Chamberlain's Cough
Remedv for more than twenty years.
and it has given entire satisfaction. I
have sold a pile of it and can recom
mend it highly. Joeph McElhiney,
Linton. Iowa, ion will find this reme
dy a good friend when troubled with a
cough or cold. It always affor Is quick
relief and is pleasant to take, ror
sale by all druggists.
j ATTACKED SENATOR CLARK. ,
MISSOULA, Aug. 20. Senator! W.
A. Clark was attacked here y a man
known as Joe Peg; wlio thought the
Senator had been breaking the game
laws and was carrying grouse in his
pocket and who thr.eatrued to take the
i& uator's life. Peg followeJ the Sen
ator several blocks persistently calling
oa him to hand over the grouse. Clark
ran panting into the lobby of the Flor
ence Hotel. The man was overpower-
etl. :;:: '. .
j !
nriEADgUARTERS FOR HOP TICK
KT8 AT STATESMAN JOB OFFICTE.
A tl. Ctrntm Stow Sir trm ill Vnm.M H
jrtfii U8v ts fan. sti .mi st n
i Sold at Dr. Stones Drag Store.
MORE SUITS
ARE FILED
NEWS IK GENERAL. 1 FROM ALL
OVER THE STATES.
A SALEM BOY IS DROWNED
Miners' Association Is Prepared, to
.Commence Suits Against Many
Enemies. ..;
Record Shipload of Flour Leaves Ta
coma With 8.C07 . Tons Frank M.
Ford Falls In River at Oregon City
: Inunction Wanted at Denver.
DENVER, CoL Aug. 31. A suit was
filed fn tne United States Circuit Court
today by the Interstate Mercantile
Company, against the Citizeps Alliance,
of Cripple ("reek, the Mine Owners'
Association of Teller county, and more
than a score of the leading citizens of
Cripple Creek and Victor. An. in junc
tion is-sought to" enable the company,
organized under the laws of Montana,
to resume its business 1 ki the cities of
Cripple Creek, and Victor, Colorado,
without interference.; y
The Citizens' Alliance and - Mine
Owners' Association it was whose mem
bers on July 20 looted and wrecked its
store and deported its manager, clerks,
and all connected with the concern, for
bidding them to return at the peril of
their lives. Sheriff Bell, of Teller
county; who failed to protect that com
pany' property, Is also made a defend
ant. - .
Salem Boy Drowned.
Oregon Citv. Auc 31. Frank M.
Ford, of Salem, formerly a 'deck hand
on the steamer Pomona, was drowned
here today. He fell .from the rocks, at
the foot of Third street into the Wil
lamette river and sunk before help
could reach him.
fVftnk i a. Mm of the late Robert
Ford, who maintained a livery stable
here for many years. Frank M. Ford was
about 27 years of age, and well-known
here.)
Record Flour Cargo.
Tacoma, Aug. 31. The liner Oanfa
will sail at Ualight with a record flour
cargo fro nit he Paeific eoast for the
Orient and Liverpool. The flour in
her carsro amounts to 91.0H0 barrels, or
over 8,600 tons and is valued at $363-
ou.
BOY HURT.
Little Clarence Shaw Suffers from a Pe
culiar Accident at the South
ern Pacific Depot
Yesterday about half an hour before
the arrival of the 11 o'clock South
bound passenger train, while the little
newsboys were playing around awaiting
the arrival of their papers for.delivery,
Clarence Shaw,, a bright little "Orego
nian" carrier, ran through the waiting
room and fell headlong beneath the
hoois of Dr. E. A. Pierce's horses that
were standing . beneath the . porte co
chere at the west of the depot. ,
Before he eould extricate; himself one
of the startled horses resented bis prox
imity to its feet by giving bim a kick
that" sent him against the building,
where he was picked up in an uncon
scious condition and carried into the
waiting room. His right ear was cut
in two, save a small bit at the
lower part, and a gash two inches in
length was made in his bead, behind the
ear. Blood flowed freely from his
mouth and when he recovered conscious
ness he complained of intense pain in
his chest, although it is not known
whether this last injurv was due to his
original fall, or from a kick or being
thrown against the building.
He was taken to the office of Dr. W.
C. Smith who dressed the wound, finding
it necessary to place eight stitches in
the ear. The little fellow bore the ope
ration without the use of an anaesthe
tic. The boy is about thirteen years of
age ami is the son of Mrs. M. E. Shaw,
of 481 Winter street, and a brother to
Mr. Bert Shaw, the welt-known trick
bicyclist.
When removed to his home in the af
ternoon his condition was not 'thought
to be serious although he was suffering
greatly.
What Is Life?
In the last analysis nobody knows,
but we do know that it is under strict
law. Abuse that law even slightly,
derangement of the organs, resulting
in Constipation, Headache or Liver
trouble. Dr. King's New Life Pills
quickly re-ad justs this. It's gentle, yet
thorough. Only 25c at R J. Fry's Drug
Store.
MORRIS-HUELAT.
Beautiful Wedding Service at the Prot-
: estant Episcopal Church Last
i .. - t Evening.
At 8 o'clock last night Rev. J. E. It.
Simpson, Protestant Episcopal minister
from Portland pronounced the words
that made William Alfred Morris and
Miriam Belt Huelat, both of Salem,
husband and wife.
The ceremony which was after the
rites of the Episcopal church, was very
impressive and was witnessed by a
large number of : relatives and friends
of the contracting parties. The ehurch
was beautifully decorated with palms
and flowers, white and green being the
prevailing colors,
The bride was met at the chancel by
the groom and his best man, Mr. Flet
cher Gaddis, of Portland.
The service began with a sola by the
brother-in-law of the bride, Mr. J. H.
Bickford, VThoo art like unto a lively
flower."- Following this Wagner's
"Bridal Chorus' from Lohengrin, was
sung by a quartette consisting of Mrs.
WCarltoa, Smith, soprano, Mrs. W. P.
Babeock, contralto, Mr. Kay Chapter
tenor, and Mr. Ralph Zereher, basso.
The accompaniment to the Bridal chorus
was by Mr. H. B. Thielsen. Misa Kims
Weller then played the wedding march,
'Traumerel' by Schumann.
The bride: was accompanied by Miss
George Giltner and Misa Lucy Williams
of Portland, as bridesmaids, and Mrs.
Louise Bickford, sister of the bride, was
matron of honor.
Following the ceremony at the church
the happy couple, were given a recep
tion' at the home of the bride's "ancle,
Hon. Geo, 1L Burnett, which was large
ly attended by the friends and relatives
tsfTMr. and Mrs. Morris. ; ; -
Judge Burnett's beautiful home was
handsomely decorated with flowers and
greens, the Stanford University colors,
red," being most prominently 4 ia evi
dence, the National colors, of the Unit
ed States occupying a prominent place
in the decorations. -
Refreshments were served and the
young people left on the late train for
a short trip -repartory, to commenc
ing the longer honeymoon that lasts
through tif e. s .
The bride was attired in a becoming
gown of white Lansdowne, with pearl
lace applique, and carried a boquet of
Bride's roses. :
Miss Williams wore a gown of white
net with-Valenciennes., lace with fblue
ribbons, and carried a handsome bunch
of white carnations.
Miss . Giltner was dressed in : blue
crepe with lace trimming and carried
white carnations.
Mrs. liiekford's dress was of flowerel
net over white silk, and her boqnet was
pnk roses.
The bride is the grand-daughter of
the late Dr. A. U. Belt, and daughter
of Mrs. S. A. Huelat of this city, and
has a host of friends. The groom is
a son of John 'Morris, who has been a
prosperous farmer in Polk county for
some yesrs and who now lives at the
corner of Marion and Thirteenth streets
in this city. He is a graduate of Stan
ford University of Palo Alto, Cab, and
has been instructor of ' Latin in the
Portland high school for the-past two
years.' On September 10th the newly
wedded- couple will leave for cam
bridge, Mass., where Mr. Morris will
take a two years' post graduate course
in Harvard University.
LODGING HOUSE BURNS.
Interor of Building Eaten Out by the
Flames and Furniture Badly
Damaged.
. At 6:30 o'clock last evening Mr. Pete
Francis and Mr. I. F. Wilcoxt discov
ered a fire in the Whitlock lodging
house near the corner of Court and
Front street.
The fire consumed most of the the in
terior of the building, and Some fur
niture, while all of the furniture and
household effects are almost worthless
from the dretiehlntr thev received, and
from breakage in getting them out of j
tne house for every door ami winnow
was locked and had to be broken
open.
No one had been in the house for sev
eral hours, Mrs. Whitlock having start
ed to Walling's hop yard at 2 o'clock
nearly five hours previous to the discov
ery of the fire.
From indications noted by those first
on the scene, the fire started in a bed
room where. there has been no fire. in
the stoe for some time, so thst its or
igin is a mystery.
So peculiarly did thefire creep about
the building before breaking out, that it
was necessary to break in some of the
walls in order to get water to the
flames.
The firemen were on the spot almost
before the, last echoes of the fire, alarm
bad died away, and as usual emerged
from the building covered with glory
WHY WE ADVERTISE
OUR DENTAL WORK
' ' ' ; ' '-I : - -' f
. We do it simply to let the people know where we are and what business we
are and what business we follow. Some dentists who throw up their hands in
horror when you mention advertising would wear the smilc-that-wont-come-off if
they could get a complimentary write up in the paper every week.
We claim that if a merchant intends to do business he must let the people
know what he has to sell. We are in the same boat to make money and at the
same time give value received;
WHAT WE ADVERTISE
We advertise a new system of painless dentistry whereby we can fill, crown,
or extract any tooth in your head absolutely without pain, do it better than the old
style dentist, and at half the price you have previously paid
HERE IS PROOF
CROWNS
FILLINGS; 50c
From now until October 1st "every patient receives a coupon for every dollar paid,
some one of which will entitle vthc holder to the Diamond Ring, worth $150, on
display in THOMPSON & CO.'S WINDOW, STATE STREET, This is
not a cheap ring valued at $150, but is a pure white stone and worth every dollar
for which it is advertised. Ask Mr. Thompson:
DR. IB
Steusloff Bldfi:., Court and Liberty Streets.
v PHONE 2S91 MAIN.
HOURS i B n. m. to A p. rrt, 7 p. m. to S. p. m. Sundays, IO a. m. to 12 m.
and ' smoke. They were ably assisted
by a volunteer corps of assistants. V,
The building was an old one belong
ing to Mr. David Simpson of this city,
'Tdnf'lf rwas "not leara! whether it car
ried insurance or not. The furniture,
however, owned by Mrs. Whitlock was
said to be partly covered by insurance.
The moss npou the roof added great
ly :, to the unpleasant features as the
fire crept along in that and resisting the
water, smoldered for over an hour.
NO AUTHORITY
LEWIS AND CLARK COMMISSION
CANNOT OFFER PREMIUMS
FOR FAIR EXHIBITS.
Matter cf What Buildings Shall Be
Erected and What They Are to Ea
Used for Is Left to the Discretion of
the Commission.
It is quite evident that some misun
derstanding has arisen between the
Commission and the Lewis and Clark
corporation as to t,heir respective pow
ers and authorities, or that the Com
mission s having a difficult time in in
terpreting the meaning of the act under
which it was created and defining its
powers, judging from the number and
character of questions sent in to the
Attorney General. Several questions
have been propounded by the Commis
sion, all of which have been answered
by the Attorney General, the substance
of which has leen published. Quite
recently : General Crawford was in re
ceipt of two more queries, respecting
the power of that 'body in ,exending
the appropriation and the erection of
buildings, both of which he answered
yesterday.
One of the questions propounded was
as to whether the Commission has au
thority to appropriate any of the fund
for premiums, or if any part of the
appropriation can be used-for the pay
ment of premiums, and the other is as
to whether there is any doubt as to
the authority of the Commission to use
anv part of the money appropriated
for the construction of buildings on
the Exposition grounds, or whether it
can erect any other buildings than that
of the state. In other words, can the
Commission erect buildings for foreign
governments' exhibits or for exhibits
from states other than Oregon, or oth
er purposes other than for bousing ths
Oregon exhibits, and the state's build
ing for the benefit of the people of the
state.. Attorney General Crawford an
swers "no" in case of the first inquiry
as to the offering of premiums outside
of the state, and says that, in regard to
the other questions, it lies within the
discretion of the Commission as to what
buildings shall be erected.
The Attorney General says the terms
of the act are very broad and must be
given a liberal construction. In an
swering the questions, he says: '
"The Commission is, I believe, the
sole judge of what buildings it erects
and the use of the same So long as tbey
are for exposition purposes. Any build
ings erected, however, will be the prop
erty of the fitaf after the Expositon
closes. J U '.. . .
"As to pcm linns., -1 notice that sec
tion six of the af provides that all pre-1
E. WRIGHT
minms shall be awarded by the corpora
tion, while section five provides that
the Commission is authorized to pur
chase of rent .exhibits. The premiums
should, in my opinion,' be general, and
would have to be awarded by the cor
poration. The Commission is authoriz
ed to, make an exhibit of the products,
etc, o'f Oregon, and not of other stMtes
or countries, and could not, in my opin
ion, award premiums out of the appro
priation, unless it should be for t)regon
products only, which would no doubt
create dissatisfaction with foreign ex
hiibtors." r
UNION COUNTY SEAT. .
War Eetween Union and La Grande
r Carried to Multnomah
j County.
I PORTLAND, Aug. 30. The removal
of the county; seat of Union county
from Union to 'La Grande whirh was
planed to take : place next week, was
been en joined by the circuit court of
Multnomah county. Friday is set as
the day for the hearing. The .contro
versy originated in the net of the Leg
islature passed in 1903 authorizing Un
ion county to hold a sjecial election to
determine the matter. This act was de
clared void by the Supreme Court on
the ground that it would necessitate
Union county contracting an Indebted
ness of more than $5000, the limit pre
scribed b ythe state constitution, and
the election was enjoined. Last June
the election was hud under the general
laws for the removal of the countv seat
and La Grande received the most votes.
I is contended in view of the special
act of 1!K3, the general laws do not
npply to Union county.
MAKES NO DIFFERENCE.
So Long as Funds Come in During the
Year They Can Be Used
Replying to a question submitted by'
Superintendent Ackerinan as to wheth
er, if the expense of holding n teachers'
institute exceeds the sum in the insti
tute fund in the county treasurer's
hands, and afterwards funds come into
the treasurer's hands, can such funds
le used to pay tli e balance of said ex
pense, Attorney General Crawford has
rendered an opinion in which he holds :
that, if the subsequent funds are re-j
ceived and properly belong to the year)
in which the institute is held, they can,
be used to defray the expense of hold-'
ing an institute for that; year, regard- '
less of whether the money i secured
before or after the date of holding the
institute. j
HAVE INVITED DIAZ.
Citizens of El Paso Have Issued An
Invitation to President of
Mexico. 1
EL PASO, Tex., Aug. 30. The offic
ial invitation issued to President Diaz,
of Mexico, has reached the hands of
the local officers of the Southwestern
Irrigation Association from Chairman
Boothe, and will le delivered to Mex
ican Consul Francisco Mallen for trans
mission to the executive this afternoon.
O
Bears the
Signstars
of
T'ud Kir.il Yoi Kan Always fcafM
PLATES
Examination Free
7
DR. STONES'
DRUG STORE
.If you want Seidlitz powder
QO TO STONE'S DRUG STORE
If yon want Bromo-Scltzer
QO TO STONE'S DRUG. 8T0RE
If. you want Bromo-qninine
GO TO STONE'S DRUQ STORE
If you want 10 cent perfume
. 00 TO STONE'S DRUQ STORE
- If you want 25 cent perfume
GO TO STONE'S DRUG STORE
If yon want: sachet powder
. GO TO STONE'S DRUG STORE
If yon want shaving mng
GO TO STONE 'S liRUG STORE
If .you want, razor strap
. GO TO STONE'S DRUG STORE
If 70U want fountain
. GO TO STONE'S DRUG STORE
If yon want Stink Foot Cure
GO TO STONE'S DRUO STORE
If you want curling iron
OO TO STONE'S DRUG STORE
If yoa want tooth powder .
GOTO STONE'S DRUG STORE
It you want Epsom Salts
GO TO STONE'S DRUO STORE
' If yon want bath brush
GO TO STONE'S DRUG STORE
If you want Bhavlng brush
GO TO STONE'S DRUG STORE
.If you want hair brush .
GO TO STONE'S DRUG STORE
If you want pocket comb
GO TO STONE'S DRUO STORE
If you want fine comb.
GO TO STONE'S DRUG STORE
if you want pocket mirror
GO TO STONE'S DRUG STORE
: .-I . - i .
If you want lady's spray syringe
GO TO STONE 'S DRUG STORE
: "- . ' I -! '
If yon want fountain syringe
--.(!...
GO TO STONE'S DRUG STORE
' i r
Tf you want bulb syringe
GOTO STONE'S DRUG STORE
.-If you want Heave Drops
GO TO STONE'S DRUG STORE
-1 - i K - j
If you want Condition Drops
GO TO STONE'S DRUG STORE
If you want worm syrup
GO TO STONE'S DRUG STORE
If you wr.nt glycerine
GOTO STONE'S DRUG STORE
If you want rose water :
GO TO STONE'S DRUG STORE
If you want face powder
GO TO STONE'S DRUG STORE
If you want Ppruna
: GO TO STONE'S DRUO STORE
; If you want toilet soap
- l ! .
- GO TO STONE'S DRUG STORE
If you want benzine
.. ,1 . .. i . . -
GO TO STONE'S DRUQ STORE
If you want gasoline
GO TO STONE'S DRUG STORE
. '- -"r .. n .- ,
If you want truss
'- ' 1 ' '
GO TO STONE'S DRUQ STORE
- .).-- i 1
If you want Wiicn Hazel Cream
i - GO TO STONE'S DRUO STORE
f If you want' turpentine
. GOTO STONE'S DRUG STORE
If you want shaving soap
GOTO STONE'S DRUO STORE
-..)' i - :
If you ! want f Castile soap
GO TO STONE'S DRUG ST0RS
If you want dog soap
GO TO STONE'S DRUG STORE
i - - r. r -If
you want j poison .fly paper .
GO TO STONE'S DRUG STORE
' - 1 . I " .
If you wanti Tanglefoot
. GO TO STONE'S DRUO STORE
' If yott want; complexion brush
i - " - i '
GO TO STONE'S DRUG STORE
If you want some. money changed
GO TO STONE'S DRUG STORE
: If you want postage stamps
GO TO STONE'S DRUG STORE
Dr. Ston owns a Drug Store,
carries a largo stock, does a
strictly "cash business.
Manyj years of experience. Con
aultation ! free. Prescription
free." Only regular prices for
the 'medicines. Treats all forms
cf disease. Can b found t
his drug' store, Salem, Oregon,
from six in the morning until
nine at nfght.
)