The Gate city journal. (Nyssa, Or.) 1910-1937, April 04, 1930, Image 9

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    THE GATE CITY JOURNAL
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by W YNDHAM MARTYN
C O P Y R IG H T I N TTTE U. 8.
W N U S ervie»
TH E STORY
Floyd Unwin and Howard
Bettington take dinner with an
old college chum, Alfred Gibbons,
financial magnate. Unwin pro­
duces a written pledge taken by
the three at college to help each
other In adversity, explaining
that he needs financial assist­
ance to educate his son Bob and
daughter Mary. Gibbons scoffs
at the “ legality” of the pledge,
but agrees to make a place for
the daughter in his organization
C H A P T E R II
Th e Planning o f the Cruise
“ The place stifled me,” said Unwin,
when he wag alone In the street with
Bettlngton.
“ Walk as far as my studio,” Bet­
tlngton suggested. “ Isn't It strange
that we should have lost sight of one
another. I feel guilty. . . . It’s
true I'm not often In New York.
, . . Tubby, I ’ll not lose sight of you
now."
Bettlngton’s studio was more a col­
lection o f marine objects, a museum of
the sea, than a plnce to work In.
There’ were two rooms at the top of
an old brawn stone house on the
north aide o f East Thirty-fourth
street lie bad a yearly lease of the
place and used It but rarely. There
were quaint figureheads of old sailing
ships now long broken up or sunk.
“ I have not always led the simple
aneventful life Gibbons assigned to
me,” the painter said smiling, when he
noted his friend's Interest. “ Sit down.
Tubby, while I make real coffee.”
Later, he began: “ I had a small
fortune when I left Harvard. I spent
most of It In seeing the world. With
what was left nnd some small savings
I have bought a camp. At present
I’m hard-up, but there’s plenty of
money In this very room If I ’m ener­
getic enough to get I t I have sold
very few of my paintings. I have been
able to afford not to. I have commis­
sions for a number which I have not
filled. That was selfish o f me. I'll
•xecute them and sell some of these
canvases. Your girl Mary shall go to
Smith, and your boy shall have the
Tech. Seawater and paint shall take
them both there. It has been a for­
tunate evening for me. I needed wak­
ing up.”
Unwin thought of how soon this
miracle might be accomplished, which
Should give his children their oppor­
tunities. The narrow things at home
had trained him to calculate with
great niceness such adjustments. Bet­
tlngton planned to start for the paint­
ing expedition within two days' time.
He would start at Gloucester and wan­
der up the coast, reaching his new
camp In far northern Maine In a
month's time.
It were wise, he
thought, to send Mary to Gibbons’
office. The pictures might not sell.
Gibbons might offer the girl a splendid
stipend. He might seek to make
amends for his brusqueness by unex­
pected kindnesses. Perhaps they had
wronged Alfred Gibbons.
Mary looked at him next morning
over the breakfast table and her eyes
“ Sit Down, Tubby, While I Make Real
Coffee.”
asked the question her lips did not
formulate.
“ Smith must wait just a little,” he
said, "but don't be cast down, Mary.
There Is hope; you will yet win to
Northampton. Take an hour off this
very day and go and see the great
Alfred Gibbons. He wants to see you.
Commercially speaking, your fortune
Is made. He Is expecting you.”
e
e
e
e
e
e
e
Mary Unwin had been almost a year
an Inmate o f the office of Elgar Rad­
w ay; she had quickly accommodated
herself to the rontlne of her work.
She worked always at top speed, as
did her employer himself, and was
pah) eighteen dollars weekly.
The
people were kindly, and Radway—
&
twenty-five dollars a week. She ought
who had no traffic with his neighbors.
to Jump at I t "
He supported himself Indifferently with
Ids fishing and chickens.
He was
It was with the hope the girl would
go that Mrs. Radway called Dext morn­ known for a bad-tempered man who
ing at the Unwins’ home. Mr. Un­ preferred hi* own company to any
win recognized her Instantly. At her other.
There was no answer to his knock
marriage Sargent’s portrait had helped
to make her famous; since that time ( upon the door, so Bettlngton, now
the society columns and Lavery's
chilled to the bone, opened It. He
found the shack had but two rooms.
painting of her had kept her In the
A living room with a bed In a corner
public eye.
The Unwins were delighted at the o f It, and a kitchen. A soapstone
Idea of Mary getting a whole month
stove gave what heal the larger room
Driftwood furnished the
on shipboard. And the additional sav­ required.
visitor with his fuel and he was soon
ing meant something to them.
thawing before the fire. Bettlngton
It was Mary herself who seemed
knew the flsherfolk; they were hospit­
dubious. She confided In her brother.
able men wherever one met them. He
"1 have a feeling,” she said, "that I
ought not to go. It’s a kind of pre­ had no fear he would get a reception
that was not cordial.
sentment. I wish you could come.”
“ I wish they would find a job for
But he did not know Jonathan
me In the engine room,” he ex­ Gibbs. The process of getting warm
claimed. His eyes brightened at the was so comforting that Bettington did
prospect o f such nearness to machin­ not hear footsteps outside. Gibbs had
ery at work. “ Gee! wouldn’t that be been out to drag his boats from their
luck. Sis, do you think It could be customary moorings at the dock to
managed? Do you think there's some­ the shelter of the shore. The first
premonition that a stranger had In­
thing I could do?”
vaded his home was the pungent smoke
“ I f there isn’t,” she decided, “ I
which bent down on him as he came
won't go.”
Radway was astounded at her de­ toward the front door.
He stopped suddenly.
HI* spare
mand.
“ What do I want with an engine- form tautened. Weariness had given
adoring boy aboard?” he snapped.
“ Perhaps your father would like to go
also?"
She colored a little. He decided
that when she flushed she was pret­
tier than any girl In the Winter Fol­
lies.
“ I ’m rather relieved,” she said quiet­
ly. “ I didn’t want to go and now I
certainly shall not.”
" I suppose I shall have to find a
place for him," Radway grumbled.
He took up some plans and glanced at
them. “ There are four boats carried,
I see, and one of them’s a twenty-one
foot launch. He shall look after It.
O f course, he’ll have to mess with the
crew. Tell him to report to Captain
Hallett, of the Albatross, at the New
York Yacht club float, at the foot of
East Twenty-third street. She leaves
Bar Harbor tomorrow night and will
be here by Sunday.”
When she was gone, Radway sank
down Into his padded chair and told
himself he was getting old. There
were physical troubles multiplying
with a frightening rapidity. After all,
he might not be able to turn this trip
Into one o f the old-time carouses.
Presently he rang a buzzer and Mary
The Sketches He Made Were the Beet
came In.
He Had Ever Done.
“ Take this telegram,” he said: " ‘W.
Clement, S. S. Albatross, Bar Harbor,
place to sudden, bewildering fear. He
Maine. Ship competent doctor aboard
retreated stealthily, nolselesly.
for trip. Health not too good.— Rad­
At the side of a rowboat, he paused.
way.’ ”
His blanched face took on something
As she was leaving the room he o f Its normal color. The Instinct to
called out more cheerfully. “ You can flee was conquered. There came yet
Insert ‘young and handsome,’ If you
more strongly to him the desire to
like. You’U have some one to play
know by what he was menaced. But
with then.”
his progression to a woodshed showed
do abatement of his caution.
From
C H A P T E R III
the top o f a closet he took down a
shotgun. Into whose twin barrels he
The Kidnaping o f Howard put No. 4 cartridges.
He opened the door o f his living
Bettington
room so softly that Bettlngton did not
Bettlngton, as he made his way
hear him. It was the cold gnat that
northward from Gloucester, felt a
made the painter look round. He saw
sense of happiness In that he had en­
a tall, keen-faced man at whose shoul­
gaged himself to lift the Unwin fam­
der was the butt o f a twelve-bore.
ily from Its monetary troubles. The
“ Don’t move,” said the fisherman.
sketches he made—which would after­
Gibbs advanced slowly Into the
ward be transferred to his big can­
room. lie had never, tc his knowledge,
vases— were the beat he had ever done.
set eyes on this stranger.
But he
He was pleased, who was ordinarily a
looked so searchlngly nnd with such
hard critic. “ This,” he cried, as he
obvious menace that Bettlngton broke
looked at a study of surf and rock,
the silence.
“ will pay Mary's tuition and board fog
“ I ought to apologize for this, I sup­
a year."
pose,” he said, “ but surely, on a night
He was perched upon a little Island
like this a man may seek shelter with­
of rock, some three miles from Black-
out being threatened with a scatter-
port. His enthusiasm led him in over­
gun.”
look the signs of a coming storm, the
“ Who were the two men you were
worst storm which late August ever
with In the post office yesterday?"
brought to the Maine const
Gibbs demanded.
With the first puff o f that fearful
“ I was not in any post office yester­
storm a great wave, like a tidal bore, day,” said Bettlngton stiffly. “ I have
rolled In and overwhelmed the rock.
not been In company with any two
Only owing to his great strength and
men for a fortnight."
ability as a swimmer was Bettlngton
Gibbs lowered his gun. He tried to
able to reach shore.
assume a look o f amiability, but there
With the storm came an awful dark­ was still anxiety written plainly. Bet
ness which presently merged Into night
tlngton, watching, noted that the gun
and left Bettlngton bruised and weary,
was still In such a position as to con­
trying to make his ways to the vil­ stitute a threat.
lage. It was midnight when a dim
Bettington related his misadven­
light showed him he was near a small
tures.
bouse. Fishing nets and lobster pots
“ A painter, eh?” said Gibbs.
He
were evidence of the calling of the
crossed the room, took down from a
owner.
shelf a pencil and a piece of paper.
Bettlngton had come to the shack
These he handed to the other.
of one Jonathan Gibbs, a surly mao.
(T O BE C O N T IN U E D )
notorious as a man-about-town—never
gone from her cheek. She felt phys­
mixed his pleasures with his work.
ically weakened. After all It was to
She was as free from harm when tak­ be a life o f office drudgery. Gibbons
ing his dictation as she would have did not understand this sudden alter­
ation.
been with a decent-minded man.
“ What’s the matter?” he said Ir­
It was to him she preferred the re­
ritably.
quest for an hour off. He was not
“ Oh, not very much," she said, “I
pleased.
was only wondering how my father
“ I ’m busy,” he grunted. “ I ’m off for
a vacation soon, and there’s a lot to could ever have called you his friend.”
"W hat?" he exclaimed. “ You are
do. Don’t be longer than an hour.”
going to throw away a chance like
He looked at her curiously as she
went from the office. As a connoisseur that ?”
She made a little gesture of despair.
o f women he admired her charm, but
“ I am going to throw It away.”
she was worth more to him in the
He was now thoroughly angry. He
office than oat of It. Radway was a
had not been so npset for months.
voluptuary of sixty who was finding
“ You deserve to starve," he snapped,
out that he lived now In a soberer
“ with that d—d fool o f a father of
age and could not adapt himself to It.
yours; and will will, too.”
Gibbons’ victory pointed the moral.
She shook her head.
He did not greatly fear Gibbons. He
“ I shan't starve, but I think I ’d
comforted himself that after a few
rather starve than do that.”
weeks on the sea he would come back
•
• e a s e s
refreshed for the big game.
Gibbons had been wrong In declar­
He was thinking o f Gibbons’ tri­
ing that the Memphis and Toledo road
umph over the Memphis and Toledo
rond, only made possible by the treach­ had been taken from Radway because
he was drunk. Gibbons had bid so
ery of a trusted mannger, when Mary
Unwin entered the office o f her fa­ high, that one on whom Radway relied
wholly had sold him. Well, that
ther's one-time friend.
Gibbons was often a matter of spec­ would not happen again. For the mo­
ment there was a lull In the warfare.
ulation among the Rndway staff. It
It was not until some allies o f Gib­
was known that he had once been
Rndwny’s clerk and had left suddenly, bons returned from Europe that the
breathing threats against his em­ struggle would begin again. And be­
ployer.
And It seemed he had de­ fore that happened there would be one
month on shipboard, where he could
voted his life to getting even for
some grievance of whose origin none fill himself with alcohol and feel he
was not ruining his prospects. It was
In his office had any definite Idea.
the debauch o f an alcoholic long de­
Mary looked at him with a curiosity
nied his pleasure.
that had nothing to do with his finan­
Elgar Radway always deceived him­
cial position. She looked at him as
self and others about this annual voy­
one who had In the other years been
age. But he never deceived his wife.
a close friend of her poor, blundering,
There had been a day, ten years
clever, but unstable father, whom she
earlier, when he was a national figure
loved the more because she saw his
In politics. The death of a governor
need.
had made him, a llttle-heard-of lieu­
Gibbons was not prepared for a tenant governor, the head o f a great
beauty. It was true, Unwin had fine
state. His financial knowledge was
features and brilliant eyes, but one at the service o f the White House at
remembered Unwin as the man who a moment when a black panic seemed
perpetually failed and looked apolo­ about to devastate the country.
getic. There was a cloud o f depres­
Senator Whitburn, of his own state,
sion about Unwin, which seemed to
looked upon Radway as his own dis­
make his carriage mean and Incon­ covery, and talked of him so much,
spicuous.
that his daughter, carried away by that
Mary was slim and held herself as
spirit which Is found so much In
though no failure or self-depreciation
Washington society, found the dis­
hRd ever come near her. There was
parity In years more than offset by
something fine about her. And the
his name, prominence and promise.
brown eyes which looked at him un­
From the beginning the marriage
der level brows raised a doubt In his was unhappy. He had found that the
mind as to the successful outcome of scandals discovered by a political rival
the scheme which was working In his
were not to be lived down in an era
crafty head. He first set himself to
when women were powers. He had
disarm her by the adoption of the air
gone back to his financing In New
of an old and privileged friend.
York. Evelyn Radway was a splendid
“ So this Is little Mary Unwin,” he
hostess. She was beautiful and she
exclaimed, shaking her hand. “ Well 1 was clever. The Radway dinner par­
Well 1”
ties were Internationally famous. He
was bound to admit that she had been
It was a banal beginning, the girl
thought. But she smiled. There must a great asset to him.
be something good I d a man whom her
It was at a dinner party that he an­
nounced his Intention o f taking a
father had liked.
“ So you want to go to Smith?” he month’s vacation.
There were as
guests some foreign financiers.
went on.
He could see her vivid Interest now.
He knew that his wife realized why
he was going.
He had never been
“ More than anything on earth,’’ she
answered. “ I don’t suppose you can able, wholly, to met the glance of those
almond-shaped violet eyes with the
ever guess how much I want I t ”
"Perhaps I can,” he smiled. “ Your calmness he wished. In ten years she
had learned most of his secrets.
father helped me to understand."
"One hears," said the president of
His air was one o f delight In well­
doing. There was bom In her heart a Paris banking house, “ that you work
a fluttering hope that for old friend­ even w het making holiday, but I never
believe that. No, no. It’s what you
ship's sake he was going to help her.
call the bluff."
The cheeks that were usually pale
“ I ’m taking a secretary and a wire­
took to themselves a lovely flush. She
less operator," Radway retorted, “ and
could not bring herself to ask what he
meant for fear of meeting disappoint­ they’re there for business. And my
wife will probably come, too—that Is,
ment. It was good to hope after so
If she cares to.”
much despair.
“ Thank you, Elgar,” she answered
“ I told your father I would help you.
The world knows me as a hard man, to his extreme surprise, “ the change
will do me good.”
but it knows me for a man of my
He smiled as though the prospect
word. I'm going to help you and your
entranced him. He now saw himself
brother."
committed to at least two extra guests.
“ Oh, Mr. Gibbons.” she cried, “ I
What on earth bad he wanted to talk
can't believe It. It Is one of those
things too good to be true! How can about taking a secretary for? He was
even more astonished to find that his
Bob and I ever thank you enough."
wife consented to come. She did not
He looked at her keenly. This was
care for the ocean as a rule.
He
the ripe moment.
rather suspected that his physician
“ You would like to feel you earned
Satisfied Yearning to
had been warning her that this trip
the money, rather than be under a
might be dangerous If he reverted to
monetary obligation to me? Is that
his old habits. She was coming to see
A certain resident of an exclusive
what you mean?”
that be kept within bounds.
New Jersey suburb startled his friends
“ O f course," she replied, “ I should
“ I am glad you are coming, Evelyn,"
recently by opening a book and maga­
expect to earn i t But how can I?"
he said when bis guests bad gone.
zine store In the town. He was known
He leaned over the glass topped
“ It will do you good.”
to be wealthy and did not need more
table.
“ You are really taking a secretary?”
money, and as he was a bridge and
“ You can." he said. “ You can very
golf addict and had other and varied
she demanded.
easily repay me for the few thousand
“ Certainly,” he said, a trifle Impa­ Interests, they could not catalogue his
dollars your education will cost You
Innovation as a hobby, even though
tiently. "This Is a business trip, as
are Radway’s private stenographer.
I told Monsieur Defamps.”
he spent nearly every evening at the
Very well, you must hnve taken many
“ There's accommodation for my
letters from him to three men named
store.
maid?” she said.
Then It occurred to a close friend
Harrod. Harte and Buford. Haven’t
“ Ample,” he answered.
to ask him outright The new book
you?”
“ What secretary will you take?”
store owner looked a little sheepish
“ Yes.” she admitted.
He thought a moment. The two
“ What I want Is this. I wish you
as he explained:
men In tils office who might answer
to leave Radway and bring to this
“ I'll tell you If you promise not to
were well enough in their way, but
office the notebooks with the letters
mention It to anyone. But all my
written since the fifth of the month to the enforced Intimacy o f shipboard
life cash register* have Intrigued me.
these men. You will find a typewrit­ would probably discover unsuspected
Every time I made a purchase I've
ing machine in the adjoining office. shortcomings.
yearned to punch the key. In fact.
“ Would you be annoyed If I took a
You will transcribe the letters and
pretty girl?”
then forget all about It."
Phosphorescent Light
“ Do you mean that slight dark girl
“ Forget?” she answered, "forget all
In damp woods and dark marshes
I have seen? Oh, Elgar, I wish you
about It?”
a phosphorescent substance forms,
"That's the Idea," he said delight­ would. It would be such company
commonly known as foxfire. When a
for me.”
edly.
He was very much relieved
dry spell occurs, accompanied by wind,
“ I f you can arrange It. I l l take her
He had dreaded the Idea of tempting
oftentimes a mass nf this formstb+n
Probably her people wouldn't let her
her. “ Forget It entirely. Go to Smith
rises and Is carried gently along In
come If I suggested It. I'll phone you
and feel that you have earned the
the form o f a cloud. It Is lumlnons,
her addrese from the office tomorrow
money. D l tell yonr father It la a
and yon can go and see her mother. If and presents a weird and strange ap­
loan, so he will feel satisfied."
pearance. ’
the baa one. Tell bar aha will get
She rose listlessly; the color bad
Punch Cash Register
on a number o f occasions five bribed
a clerk to allow me to ring up my
own money. It's a queer sort of com­
plex, I know, but as long as I enjoy
punching cash registers I'm going to
continue it.”— New York Sun.
Virginia Homo of Culture
Localism alone can produce. In the
case of America, a thoroughly authen­
tic type of man; this type uloue can
be the germ cell o f nn authentic Amer­
ican nation. Again, localism alone can
lead to culture; It must start as a sin­
gular and single and. therefore, small
thing. It will grow snd spread as
time goes on. The only really cul­
tural atmosphere one finds today in
America Is that o f Virginia. The cul­
tured men who were bom In It* field
o f force are responsible for most that
I* of cultural value In America. But
how different Virginia Is from all oth­
er states! Its culture Is a particular
one; It Is not only a matter of age
but of kind ss well.— Hermann Key
serllDg In Atlantic Monthly.
Old Massachusetts Towus
Plymouth is the oldest town In M a»
■achuaetta, and Baleni comes next.
Thru« Leaders
London's literary bigwigs were be­
ing discussed.
“ George Bernard Shaw,” said a
publisher, “ treated me to a vegeta­
rian luncheon and told me with some
pride during the carrot course that
his ‘Back to Methuselah' was the
longest play that had ever been writ­
ten.
“ He said that Wells’ ‘Clissold’ was
the longest novel ever written, and
that Arnold Bennett was going to do
an uplift book that would be the
longest o f Its kind twice over.
“ Then Shaw wound up with a
laugh:
“ ‘In fact, we three have now es­
tablished our claim to being the
world’s leading dry goods mer­
chant*.’ "
WHEN IT LOOKS DARK to any
weak, nervous or
ailing woman, Dr.
Pierce’» Favorite
i Prescription
comes to her aid.
Women In every
walk of life today
say Dr. Pierce’s
P a v o r i t * Pre­
scription is a re­
liable medicine. It
Is made from roots
and herbs, sold by
druggists, in both fluid and tablets.
Blaine, W ish.—“ I un so (lad I have (he
opportunity to tell what Dr. rie re«'» medicinas
have dona far m » I have used the 'Favorite
Prescription’ for over ten yearn and think It la
e wonderful medicine. It Just acema to build
up ail the organa.
" I have also uaed Dr. Pierce's Lotion Tablets
—they are the beat sanitary wash I aver used.
“ I am stronser since ueln* Dr. Pierce'« med­
icines than I aver was fat my lile."—Mr». H. D.
Walter, Box 4S4.
Send 10c for trial pkg. tablets to Dr.
Pierce’s Invalids Hotel, Buffalo, N. Y.
I You can have a radiane cae
and the charm o f vouch If
M A R C E L L E Faon Pow de
M A R C E I l T F a T e ^ o w d e r
Quickly macche» tou » complexion '
and bringt out tha a
M A R C E L L E Faca P o w d er make« '
four »kin feel younger and you your-
ktalf look younger.
THen people w ill c
r »a y —" W h a t lovely «kin you haveP* (
Popular size packages at l5c and 50c, 1
_ all ahadea—at all dealer».
Send fo r free liberal »ample
and complexion chart
a far latfaC
Complexion Requisites
Queen Hatchery Huskies
• for Poultry Profits
R . I. R a d s , R . I . W h h a a ,
W h i t s Rocks, B a rra d Rocks,
B lac k M inorca*, Black G ia n ts ,W h it*
L e g h o r n s — a ll from carefully su per­
vised flocks. A ls o W . L . P ullets, ye a r­
lin g hana an d d a y o ld turkeys. O rd e r
n o w to Insure de live ry w h e n wanted.
W rite f o r Spooimt D iro o u n t.
1 00 $ liv e de live ry guaranteed. 20
y e a rs ' reputation y o u r safeguard.
(MY T0D0) QUEEN
24201 s t Avenue
Speedy Toys in Europe
HATCHERY
.
Seattle
Children In Europe are demanding
speed In their toys.
Six-year-old
Mario Conterlo recently appeared on
the streets of Paris on his motor-
driven
unlcycle.
Three-year-old
Warner Klmpel, son of a famous
German auto racer, has his own elec­
tric racing car, and Alfredo Boni-
fatti, aged four, drives through the
streets o f Rome on a tiny, but
speedy, motor cycle.
PAINS
SUFFERING ELIMINATED
15-years success In treating Rectal arid
Colon troubles by the Dr. C J. Dean
NON-SUBC1CAL method as-
able» us to slv* W RITTEN AS­
SURANCE of PILES ELIMI­
N ATE D or FEE REFUNDED.
Send today for FREE 100-rasa
nook describing ceases and prop.
“ J— *-----* of such ailments.
N o matter how severe,
you can always have
immediate relief t
P A R K E R ’S
H A IR B A L S A M
Bayer Aspirin stop* pain qnickly. It
does it without any ill effects. Harmless
to the heart; harmlesa to anybody. But
it alwaya brings relief. Why suffer?
• Dandruff-Stop« Hair Failing
Im parta C o lo r and
to G r a y an d F a d ed H air
e and
at Druggists.
11.00
BAYER
A S P IR IN
FLORE3TON S H A M P O O — Ideal for use la
connection with Parker'« Hair Balsam. Makes the
hair eoft and fluffy. 60 cents by mail or at drug
gista. Iiiscox Chemical Works, Patchogue, N.
:r.
W. N. U., PO RTLAND , NO. 14-1930.
Nation’s Gold Production
A Rare Caee
The production o f gold In the Unit­
ed States which averaged about $92,-
Blinks— B ill’s w ife has the utmost
740,000 for the eight years up to confidence In him, hasn’t she?
Jinks— Say, she even lets him buy
1913, has stendlly declined until In
1928 It was only $40,103,000, repre­ his hats and suits without, going
senting practically a 50 per cent de­ along to do the choosing for him.
crease.
The new telescope at Tasadena,
Yon don’t have to speak; but you Calif., will have a lens 16 2-8 feet In
have to hear.
diameter.
Bride Tells Her Secret
“ T ^ O R a young bride of twenty-
J l one to lose her vitality and pep
is disastrous, almost a sacrilege,”
says Mrs. George E. Pillow, of
Franklin, V «. “ That, however,” she
continues, “ is just what I did.”
“ I had only been married a few
months to an athletic husband, who
went everywhere and did every­
thing. I tried to keep up with his
pace, and simply collapsed under the
strain. I never was really ill; just
sallow-skinned, depressed, and life­
less. Swimming, dancing, golf, I just
couldn’t face them. When I began to
lose my clear complexion, I was
desperate.
“ Then one day a girl friend came
to pay me a visit. In the bottom of
her little bag of clothes lay a crystal-
clear bottle— Nujoll A short wo­
man-to-woman talk— a telephone
call to a neighboring drug store— and
my future happiness was settled.
"T h at was a year ago. Now I too
am never without Nujol, which has
brightened and cleansed my body
like a cake of pure soap. I eat, sleep,
swim, snd hike with the enthusiasm
of a child. M y complexion is all it
used to be— and beat of all— I am
m y husband’s little pal again.”
The wonderful thing about crystal-
dear Nujol la that it is not a medl­
dne; it contains no drugs—it cannot
hurt even a baby. I t is simply the
normal Internal lubrication which
Beauty, Charm, Clear Skin-
How Can They be Won?
your body needs. Let Nujol clear
the poisons out of your body (we all
have them), and flood the sunshine
of happiness into your life.
I t sounds like a fairy tale, but
millions of people have proved it. So
can you. Get Nujol st any drug store
—sold only in sealed packages, with
the Nujol trademark. It costs but a
few cents snd it will make you leal
like a million dollars!____________ *
Shampoo the
C17TICURA
way
W hat a delightful and healthful shampoo
It giveel Anoint tho ecalp lightly with
C U T IC U R A O I N T M E N T ¡U le n n u k e a
strong euda with C U T IC U R A S O A P by
dissolving shavings of the S O A P la
hot water. W e t the heir thoroughly,
then shampoo with tho ends and
rinse, several times, finishing with
tepid or cold water. Thin wffl keep
yonr ecalp In a healthy condition,
a n d y o n r h a ir w ill b e s o ft a n d
(gtiCUTfl