Vernonia eagle. (Vernonia, Or.) 1922-1974, October 06, 1933, Page 3, Image 3

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    FRIDAY, OCTOBER 6, 1933.
VERNONIA EAGLE, VERNONIA, OREGON
LAST CHANCE GIVEN TO
GET WHEAT PLAN MONEY
Herminia Eagle
Member of National Editorial
Association and Oregon State
Editorial Association.
Issued Every Friday
*2.00. Per Year in Advance
Temporary rate $1.50 a year; six months 75c; two years $2.50
Entered as second class matter August 4, 1922, at the post
office at Vernonia. Oregon, under the act of March 3, 1879.
Advertising rates—Foreign, 30c per inch; local, 28c per inch;
legal notices, 10c per line first insertion, 5c per line succeeding
insertions; classified lc per word, minimum 25c first insertion,
15c succeeding insertions; readers, 10c a line.
RAY D. FISIIER, Editor and Publisher
REFUNDING SCHOOL WARRANTS
»
Petitions are being circulated asking the directors of
TTnion High school district 1 to submit to the voters a
easure providing for a bond issue to take up outstanding
warrants.
While bond issues are as rule deservedly under the
ban of electors nowadays, this proposal measure has con­
siderable merit. It would not be an additional item of
expense, but merely a transference from one form of
indebtedness to another—an indebtedness that in either
form must be provided for, as required by law. In fact,
the expense would be less because a bond issue could be
floated at five per cent while warrants must draw six
per cent.
The advantages are many, besides the saving of one
cent interest on each dolllar of principal, A bond issue
would enable the district to be on a cash basis, because
well secured bonds with definite due dates both for the
payment of principal and interest, are a desirable invest­
ment. A warrant is not desirable because it is not due
at any specific time, and no interest can be collected until
the warrant is called. Warrants ordinarily have a very
limited market, the chief demand for them being as pay­
ment for taxes.
Warrants pyramid from year to year, interest piling on
interest and principal upon principal, whereas a bond issue
cannot increase unless so authorized by the voters,
The high school district is in a particularly favorable
situation for issuing bonds to take up warrants because
it has no present bonded indebtedness and the valuation
of the district is high, affording ample security. There
are at present about $38,000 of unpaid warrants, and re­
funding these by issuing bonds would put the district in
excellent financial shape. It would help the community
too, for teachers, bus drivers and other employes would
get cash, which would chiefly be spent here.
Our old friend Paul Robinson is johnny-on-the-spot at
Bonneville. Paul certainly knows how to publish a news­
paper in a young and rapidly growing community, for his
success in the Vernonia of ten years ago was a notable
achievement.
Canyon April 21.
Among Our
Neighbors •
PACIFIC
INTERNATIONAL
Ten Years
Order of Eastern Star
Nehalom Chapter 153, O.
E. S.
m .
r*.
o.
Regular commu­
nication first
and third Wed­
nesdays of each
month, at Ma­
sonic Temple.
All visiting sis­
ters and broth­
ers welcome.
Mrs. A. J. Hughes, W.M.
Leona McGraw, Sec.
Pythian Sisters
J. A. Thornburgh
President
R. G. Thornburgh
Cashier
^3
RODEO
LODGES
"The Roll of Honor Bank”
week end at her home in River­
view.
Mrs. Lee Bowers and daughter
Barbara Helen, also Evelyn May
went to Vancouver. Wash., Tues­
day.
Mrs. Frank Hankel was very ill
Monday.
Lloyd Coffman from Mist is
now employed at the Kostur Pro­
ducts Co.
Mis. C. Guill spent Monday
and Tuesday with her mother,
Mrs. George Parker.
Mrs. F. Cummings and daugh-
ter Virginia returned from Van-
couver, where they spent the
summer.
Labina Cinen from Vernonia
spent Saturday with Joy Willard.
Mrs. E. O. Robbins spent Wed­
nesday with Mrs. Elsie Parker.
Mr. and Mrs. Fred Cummings
and Virginia attended the dog
races in Vancouver last week.
Miss Mary Erickson, a teacher
from Vernonia grade school and
Miss Enid Bolton from Vernonia
high school visited Mrs. M. Wil­
lard Sunday.
Mr. and Mrs. Virgil Powell
spent Saturday and Sunday in
Tillamook.
Mrs. J. Burtraw from Soules
hill spent Monday with Mrs. Rob-
bina.
Eugene Elliott left Saturday
for California where he has em­
ployment.
Mrs. Hartung spent Tuesday
afternoon with Mrs. Fred Heg-
german.
Jack Christenson’s foot has im­
proved very much since the last
writing.
Mr. and Mrs. Joe Magoff were
charivaried Monday evening.
Mr. and Mrs. Ed Buckner were
in Portland Sunday and Monday
on business.
With the deadline for signing
Everett Rundell
applications for wheat allotments
set forward about two weeks in
many Oregon counties, particular­
Douglas Burrell from Camp 8
ly west of the mountains, those in spent the week end with Elza
charge of the campaign in this Varley.
Roy Harper from Carlton visit­
state are making a final effort
to see that every wheat grower ed at the Varley home Tuesday
benefits | , evening.
is acquainted with the benefits
that await him under the provi- I Lucille Lindbergh is on the
sions of the act, and that he Riverview sick list this week.
Mr. and Mrs. J. W. White ieft
knows that this is the last chance
to get an allotment for the com­ Saturday evening for The Dalles,
ing two years.
where they will spend a few
“Indications are that many far­ weeks with Mrs. White’s daugh-
mers are just now realizing the ter, Mrs. M. J. Murphy.
The son of Mr. and Mrs. O.
fact that this plan affords imme­
diate cash benefits to the indivi­ H. Robbins had the misfortune of
dual and that its advantages to falling off the bed and breaking
the average wheat grower do not his collar bone.
Hazel Chapman spent Sunday
depend entirely on future bet­
terment of the wheat markt,’’ with her aunt, Mrs. Frank
says Paul V. Maris, director of Hankel.
the Oregon State college exten­
Lynn Selfridge and Miss Gusta
sion service, which is directing Hoffman from Hillsboro spent
the educational and organization Saturday evening with Mr. and
campaign. “As fast as this is Mrs. Dan May.
Misses Vera and Evelyn Varley
understood, farmers have hurried
to get in their applications. Ex­ visited their grandmother in For­
tension from the first deadline of est Grove Saturday.
September 25 was granted at the
Mr. and Mrs. Spurge Golden
request of many organizations to visited at the Varley home Fri­
accommodate these late comers.” day evening.
Estimates made at the end of
Mrs. Eastman is spending a
the first closing date were that week with her daughter, Mrs. A.
Oregon will ultimately turn in F. Kostur.
6000 applications covering some
Miss Norma Anderson spent the
800,000 seeded acres of wheat,
’
t
handling
the logs is now being
Maris has reported to Wahington.
run
out
from
Keasey about 12
Eastern Oregon has given quick
and hearty support to the plan, miles.
running 90 per cent or better.
The Albert Parker home has re-
Western Oregon, with its many
small acreages, has been slower cently been remodeled and paint-
and it is doubtful if the final ed.
e e e ♦ • * •
signup will exceed 50 per cent
Mr.
and
Mrs. R. Sesseman have
of the acreage, though nearly all
the larger growers have applied had their home fixed up “fit for
a king.”
for allotments.
* * * » « » •
Honesty is put to a hard test
Secretary of Agriculture Wal­
in hard times.—Ex.
A.
B.
Counts
has
sold
all
his
lace has directed a final warn­
ing to growers in states that have property on the east side of Rock
been slow to sign up that there creek to Walter McDonald. Mr. 23rd.Annual ------
is absolutely no prospect of bet­ Counts purchased Harve Duncan’s
1
moved in.
tering the wheat situation without place and • has
«***»•
production control as provided in
The new addition to the school
the allotment plan. Incomplete re­
>.
ports near the end of September building is completed and school LIVESTOCK £
’TÏ
showed 380,472 farmers had sign­ opened Oct. 1.
EXPOSIT
liitJv
ed applications agreeing to take
George McDonald lost a valu­
more than 4% million acres out
of production in return for the able cow this week. She ate dy­
cash benefit payments, Wallace namite wrappings, resulting in her
reported. The original goal was death.
ORSE
the retirement of about 9% mil­
Leroy
Malmsten
left
Sunday
to
SHOW
lion acres from wheat production.
attend commercial school in Port­
Those who sign will get the
market price for three crops plus land.
*«**««*
cash benefit payments, it is em­
PORTLAND, OREGON
Monday was Albert Parker’s
phasized. Those who stay out will
48th
birthday.
He
was
pleasantly
October 21 to 28
get only the market price.
surprised by a crowd that brought
19 Shows in One—11 acres under one
roof. Exhibits of pure-bred Livestock,
“eats,” and all had a bountiful
Dogs, Poultry, Pet Stock, Wild Life, Land
dinner at the camp of the Verno­
Products, Manufactured Products, 4-H
nia Pole Co.
Club and Smith-HughesVocational Edu­
*•*«•••
cation Work; Combination Horse Show
and Indoor Rodeo.
Lester Sheeley, secretary of the
chamber of commerce, is promot-
LARGE PREMIUM LISTS
ing a community band, to be led
REDUCED FARES - ALL LINES
Vernonia Eagle, Oct. 5, 1923
by Mr. and Mrs. Edwin Wetmore.
The St. Helens Chamber of
Commerce has requested the state
highway commission to paint a
traffic line strip along the Lower
A Knights of Pythias lodge was
organized Saturday in the Grange
The Fir-Tex mill at St. Helens Columbia highway.
hall. Visitors were here from
is scheduled to open October 9,
Mrs. Attla M. Lee has been ap­ Portland, St. Helens, Astoria and
employing about 150 peapie, 40
extra on account of the NRA. pointed acting postmistress of Seaside.
«*•**•«
The mill has enough orders from Rainier, succeeding Mrs. Celia
C. C. C. camps to last for two Victors.
A. L. Fenner of the Vernonia
months, it has been announced.
pool hall has purchased all the
Bids for construction of a new Purney fixtures and added them
is needed to obtain data bridge over the Clatskanie river to his own business.
that oust be presented to gov­ at Clatskanie are expected to be
ernment officials before they can called for Nov. 25 or Dec. 7.
The Birkenfeld Lumber Co. be­
p < s on the $50,000 city dock
gan logging this week on the Win.
William E. Seifert was shot be­ Pringle place.
■ posed to be built from federal
»»»«»»»
gilds', Byron Wright, president of low the heart Tuesday while at­
the St. Helens chamber of com- tempting to elude a posse near
A tract of timber of four
m rce. has announced, and a can- his home at Deer Island, and was square miles beyond Keasey has
vas» \ '.eing made to obtain the taken under guard to the St. been purchased by the East Side
Helens hospital. He was wanted Logging Co. A railroad line for
money.
at Puyallup, Wash., for a charge
C. A. Howard, state school sup- of kidnapping and robbing a ser-
erintendent, and Chas. F. Walker, ! vice station operator. His brother
president of the Northwestern [ is in the Washington state peni­
School of Commerce at Portland, tentiary for bank robbery.
will be the principal speakers at
No man can tell what the fu­
the teachers’ institute to be held
A. F. & A. M.
in the John Gumm school, St. ture may bring forth, and small
Vernonia Lodge No. 184
opportunities are often the be­
Helens, Oct. 17.
A. F. & A. M. meets
ginning of great enterprises.
at
Masonic
Temple,
Jake Silverman is scheduled to
Stated
Communication
Prize fighters are peaceable
First Thursday of each
be tried in the circuit court at
month. Special called
St. Helens Oct. 16 for the mur­ men. Their blows are worth
meetings on all other Thurs
der of James Walker in Dutch money.—Ex.
day nights 7:30 p.m. Visitors
most cordially welcome.
Emil F. Messing, W. M.
D. Macpherson, Secretary
The Forest Grove
National Bank
Riverview
PAGE THREE
Vernonia Temple 61 meets
every 2nd and 4th Wednesday» in
W.O.W. haB.
Florence Nanson, M. E. C.
Clara Kerns, M. or R. & C.
Professional & Business Directory
be observed. All are cordially in­
vited to these services.
Evening services: 6:30, Chris­
tian Endeavor, Bill Lumm, leader.
Let’s have a good turn out again
this week, as we had last. At 7:30
the third in a series of sermons
CHRISTIAN CHURCH
on Scriptural fullfilment, viz: The
Jews and Scriptural Fulfillment.
F. Claude Stephens, Minister
This subject is very much to the
Great services for Oct. 8 — forefront at this time.
9:45 a. m. we want—we expect
Sunday, October 15, Home De­
300 at Bible school, which is Ral­
ly day. Bible lesson, “Saul in partment Day. All members of
Damascus,” Acts 9:1-31. 10:45,! home department will be there.
Divine morning worship. Theme,) Cars will be provided for those
"What the Altogether of God Is.” I unable to come. Bear it in mind.
6:30 p. m., Christian Endeavor.)
7:30 p. m., challenging evening: MRS. POWELL ENTERTAINS
service. Theme, “The Perfected FOR MRS. NANSON
Christ.” Services will be enjoyed
For the pleasure of Mrs. James
by all coming.
Remember Rally day and that Nanson of Astoria, Mrs. Virgil
you are welcome. Important an­ Powell entertained with two
nouncements for interesting fu­ tables of bridge Thursday even­
ing, September 28, preceded by a
ture. Hear them!
pot-luck dinner.
Those present were Mrs. Nan­
EVANGELICAL CHURCH
son, Mrs. Harry Kerns, Mrs.
D. R. Kauffman, Pastor
Lloyd Baker, Mrs. W. M. Hen­
Sunday, Oct. 8—Morning ser­ derson, Mrs. Tom Crawford, Mrs.
vices: 9.45, Sunday school, sub­ W. J. Armitage and Mrs. Rose
ject, “Saul in Damascus.” At Fletcher. Mrs. Baker held high
11, preaching, “Ye Are My Wit­ score at bridge and Mrs. Armi­
nesses.” The Lord’s Supper will tage low.
NOTICE OF SCHOOL MEETING
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN to the legal voters of School
District No. 47, of Columbia County, State of Oregon, that a
SCHOOL MEETING of said district will be held at Washington
School on the 20th day of October, 1933, at 8:00 o’colck in
the afternoon for the purpose of discussing the budget here­
inafter set out with the levying board, and to vote on the propo­
sition of levying a district tax.
The total amount of money needed by the said school district
during the fiscal year beginning on June 19, 1933, and ending
June 18, 1934, is estimated in the following budget and includes
the amounts to be received from the county school fund, state
school fund, elementary school fund, district tax, and all other
moneys of the district.
BUDGET
ESTIMATED RECEIPTS
From county school fund .........
$ 6,000.00
From state school fund ...................................
700.00
From elementary school fund ......................... 3,000.00
Receipts from all other sources:
1. O. and C. fund ...................................
300.00
2. Other sources (delinquent taxes) ....... 20,330.63
Total Estimated receipts .............................. _.......................... $30,330.63
ESTIMATED EXPENDITURES
I. GENERAL CONTROL
1. Personal Service:
(2) Clerk ................................................. $
(4) Compulsory education and census .....
3. Elections and publicity .............................
4. Legal service (clerk’s bond, audit, etc.)
5. Other exoenses of general control:
(1) Phone ......................................
6. Total Expense of General Control
II. INSTRUCTION—Supervision
216.00
25.00
60.00
25.00
50.00
............................ $
1. Personal service:
(2) Principal ...............................................
2. Supplies, principals and supervisors .......
1,600.00
50.00
5. Total Expense, Supervision
III. INSTRUCTION—Teaching
................
376.00
1,650.00
1. Personal service:
(1) Teachers: 5 teachers @ $110.00. 4
teachers @ $105.00, 3 teachers @
$100.00, 2 teachers @ $95.00 ................. 13,140.00
2. Supplies (chalk, paper, etc.) .................
200.00
3. Textbooks (desk copies and indigents) ....
250.00
6. Total Expense of Teaching ............................................ 13,590.00
IV. OPERATION OF PLANT
1. Personal service:
(1) Janitors and other employes ...............
2. Janitors’ supplies ........................................
3. Fuel ............................................................
4. Light and power ..........................................
5. Water ..........................................................
7. Other expense of operation ....................
1,395.00
200.00
155.00
300.00
200.00
30.00
1. Repair and replacement of furniture
and equipment ............................................
2. Repair and maintenance of buildings
and grounds ................................................
150.00
8. Total Expense of Operation ............................................
V. MAINTENANCE AND REPAIRS
350.00
4. Total Expense of Maintenance and Repairs ...........
VI. AUXILIARY AGENCIES
1. Library:
(2) Library books .....................................
(3) Supplies, repairs, etc...........................
2. Health service:
(2) Supplies and other expenses .............
3. Transportation of pupils:
(1) Personal service ...............................
4. Other auxiliary agencies:
(3) Board and Tuition .............................
2,280.00
500.00
100.00
50.00
10.00
4,100.00
360.00
5. Total Expense of Auxiliary Agencies ...........................
VII. FIXED CHARGES
4,620.00
8. Total Fixed Charges ...............................................-.......
VIII. CAPITAL OUTLAYS
1,060.00
1. Insurance ...................................................
1,060.00
4. New furniture and equipment .................
150.00
7. Total Capital Outlay
...........................................
150.00
IX. DEBT SERVICE
1.
2.
4.
5.
Principal on bonds ................................. 18,500.00
Principal on warrants ............................... 20,330.63
Interest on bonds ..................................... 3,376.90
Interest on warrants ................................. 1,000.00
9. Total Debt Service
X. EMERGENCY
........................................................ 43,207.53
.......................................
1.
1,000.00
3. Total Emergency ..............................................................
1,000.00
RECAPITULATION
Total estimated expenses for the year ......... $68,433.53
(Sum of items 1-6, II-5, III-6, IV-8 V-4,
VI-5, VII-5, VIII-7, IX-9, X3)
Total estimated receipts, not including pro­
posed tax ................................................... 30,330.63
Balance, amount to be raised by district tax ..................... $38,102.90
SUMMARY OF ESTIMATED EXPENDITURES
For school year from June 19, 1933, to June 18, 1934.
Personal service sum of I-l-(2), (4); II-l
IIWIM,
it - i - ii ),
y&v,vio.vu
Supplies II-2; III-2 ; IV-2; VI-l-(3), 2-(2) .....
510.00
Maintenance and repairs V-4 ...........................
500.00
Debt Service IX-9 ...............
43,207.53
Miscellaneous sum of 1-3, 4, 5; III-3; IV-3,
4, 5, 7; VI-l-(2), 4-(3) ; VII-5; VIII-4 ........... 2,740.00
Emergency X-3 ................................................. 1,000.00
Total
............................................................... $68,433.53
INDEBTEDNESS
1. Amount of bonded indebtedness (include
all warrants issued by vote of electors ..... 66,500.00
2. Amount of warrant indebtedness on war­
rants i»""-'d •>nd endorsed “not paid for
lack of fun ’ •
................................... 20,330.63
i 4. Total Ind*■ b.s ’r :ss < sum of items 1, 2)
$86,830.63
Dated this 2oth day of September, 1933.
Attest—LO EL ROBERTS,
R. M. ALDRICH,
District Clerk.Chairman, Board of Directors.