Vernonia eagle. (Vernonia, Or.) 1922-1974, August 04, 1933, Page 3, Image 3

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    VERNONIA EAGLE, VERNONIA. OREGON
FRIDAY, AUGUST 4, 1933.
"Hrninnia Eagle
Issued Every Friday
$2.00. Per Year in Advance
Entered as second class matter August 4, 1922. at the post
office at Vernonia. Oregon, under the act of March 3, 1879.
Advertising rates—Foreign, 30c per inch; local, 28c per inch;
legal notices, 10c per line first insertion, 5c per line succeeding
insertions; classified lc per word, minimum 25c first insertion,
15c succeeding insertions; readers, 10c a line.
RAY D. FISHER, Editor and Publisher
ELECTING THE MARSHAL
What of electing the city marshal, as proposed in one
of the charter amendments to be voted on next Monday ?
This newspaper has already stated its opinion that
the marshal should be an appointive, not an elective office,
because it is his duty to carry out the orders of the
council, and it should have complete control over him.
The right of the council to define the duties of a
marshal elected by the people need not be called into ques­
tion. Its right to make commands is no less than under
the present method. But how about the ability to enforce
the commands?
Assume, for example, that the council wishes to con­
tinue one man on the force, who shall be on duty nights,
from 6 p. m. to 4 a. m. Some elected marshal happens to
consider those hours inconvenient, and picks his own. The
council, unable to discharge him, may do one of two things:
it may reduce his salary, or it may institute a recall.
Salaries of city employes are fixed not by resolution, but
by ordinance, and to pass a punitive ordinance reducing a
salary and amending it again when the need for it is
past, is a cumbersome procedure far from effective in
gaining the desired end. That very scheme, once tried in
Vernonia, is one of the unhappy experiences of the past
that had best not be repeated. As for the recall method,
nothing that any town can do arouses as much fighting,
bickering and snarling among persons who are neighbors
and should be friends as a recall of one of the town officers.
Here again, once was enough.
Under the present method it is not at all likely that
any such misunderstanding will arise. A marshal appointed
by the mayor with the consent of the council expects to
obey orders or resign. If he has to be fired, that bit of
business can be easily attended to without disturbance.
Yet in the case of an elected marshal, it is not necessary
to assume a wilful disobedience of orders, a heated clash
between council and marshal, in order to detect flaws in
the plan. What of minor neglects — streets improperly
cleaned, sidewalks not repaired—any number of things that
taken together would merit the marshal a reprimand and,
if no improvement were shown, a dismissal? If he is
elected no one can dismiss him short of the expiration of
his term, and assuredly no reprimand would mean
anything.
Finally an elected marshal can easily be the tool of
some faction, winking at law violation by his friends, and
bearing down severely on those who favored some other
candidate. He could be dripping wet, regardless of all ordi­
nances, or he could be arid, and govern his procedure
accordingly.
In view of these objections, this newspaper recom­
mends a vote of 307 No.
bent upon the nation to eliminate
the evils of prohibition, but also
to erect safeguards against those
other evils which were no less
stinking.
The advent of beer points the
object lesson: sell openly and Bankers Evolve Plan for
cheaply the liquors of small alco­
Stimulating Important Aid
holic content, and restrict the
to Farm Success
sales of hard liquor to sealed I
packages, to be consumed in the !
HE Cache county, Utah, bankers
home. There was truth in the I
recently added a stimulus to
claim of the drys that prohibition
banker-farmer cooperative work by
eliminated the sots who slept in launching a farm accounting contest.
the gutter, that prohibition made At a meeting of the Clearing House
the streets safe for women; it is Association the project was put be­
obvious that these particular be­ fore the bankers and accepted.
nefits must be retained. Since
Each bank In the county agreed
beer has come back, very much to enroll a minimum of five farmers
less whisky, gin, and other rot­ in the farm accounting project.
gut moonshine has been consum­ The names of the farmers when en­
ed; it is much easier to stop at rolled will be sent to the Secretary
the corner grocery and pick up a of the Clearing House, and also to
the Extension Division of the Utah
few bottles of the foamy brew, State Agricultural College. The
easier than it is to call up the bankers agree to cooperate and
bootlegger. Parenthetically, the keep in close touch with each farmer
bootlegger never was a desirable they enroll so as to insure the com­
person to deal with. As for the pletion of a maximum number. The
statement that consumption of bank which succeeds at the conclu­
hard liquor has decreased, note sion of the contest In enrolling the
that druggists are not selling so largest number of farmers complet­
ing the project will be giveu a
much “cold cure” any more.
special recognition.
If only light wines and beer are
sold over the country in glasses,
then we eliminate the most potent
source of drunkenness. If the sa­
loon is prevented, then we have
all the benefits of prohibition—
and none of the evils.
Now, beer is beer, but there are
many sorts of wines. Some wines
Vernonia Engie, Aug. 3, 1923
needless to say are very nearly as
strong as whisky; it is necessary
It was on Aug. 4 one year ago
that such liquor be sold only in
bottles. Perhaps it would be a that the Eagle was born.
good general rule to say that no
Our prosecuting attorney, John
liquor with alcoholic content in
excess of five per cent should be L. Foote and the county sheriff
sold over the counter; that phrase were in Vernonia yesterday. Any
would be a matter for the gentle­ one operating moonshine stills
men of medicine to determine. will please report to the attorney
The main thing is to keep whisky or sheriff within a few days and
it is safe to presume that your
where it belongs.
enterprise can be successfully
settled up at a cost to yourself of
WORTHLESS INSURANCE
not to exceed a few thousand dol­
POLICIES ON SALE IN
STATE SAYS AVERILL lars.
T
Ten Years
Ago « * * *
Salem, Ore., July 29 - ^Special)
Oregonians are spending hun­
dreds of dollars yearly with unli­
censed, unqualified and so-called
protective, non-profit organiza­
tions for insurance benefits rarely
given, according to A. H. Aver-
ille, insurance commissioner. Des­
pite repeated warnings from this
office through the medium of the
press cautioning the public to be­
ware of strangers representing
concerns of this class, these oper­
atives still succeed in selling
worthless policies and collecting
money from people who can
least afford to lose.
The latest to invade Oregon
territory, which have come to the
attention of the insurance de­
partment, are two so-called bur­
ial associations known as the Na­
tional Burial association of Amer­
ica and the New Deal Burial as­
sociation, both of Dallas, Texas,
and Mr. Averill requests that a-
gents representing these concerns
be reported immediately to the
state police or to his office, as it
is only with the cooperation of
the public that progress can be
made towards stamping out this
loon that was responsible for all illegal practice.
the evils that national prohibi-
tion was Intended to cure. If the
No “cheap jobs” are turn­
saloon comes back we shall have ed out in the Vernonia Eagle
the evils again—and none of the commercial printing depart­
better
conditions lvi
for which
ucuxi vunmuuiia
wiiivu we
wv , ment
IlieilL —
--- JUSL
just 111^11
high vloS
class jobs
have been striving. It is incum-1 at a reasonable price.
What Other
Editors • • •
Think . • . •
NO SALOONS PLEASE
(St. Helens Sentinel-Mist)
Oregon has voted definitely
wet, and becomes the twentieth
state to ratify the twenty-first
amendment. In only one state,
Tennessee, has the vote been
close ;the eighteenth amendment
will probably be forever gone by
the end of the year. It is time to
think of the future.
Oregon repealed its enforce­
ment law last fall, and repealed
the state prohibition amendment
last Friday. When the national
amendment is gone, there will re­
main only the old regulatory laws
in force before Oregon and the
nation went “dry.” Now, nobody
wants the saloon; it is that rot­
ten institution that disgusted the
nation with liquor. It was the sa­
loon at which all the dry propa-
gganda was aimed; it was the *a-
One Price
The Forest Grove
National Bank
Forest Grove, Oregon
“The Roll of Honor Bank”
STATEMENT OF CONDITION
At call of the Comptroller of
Currency, June 30, 1933.
Resources
Loans ...................................... ....... $273,957.93
Banking House ............................
18,,400.00
Real Estate ....... ...........................
4,936.16
Bonds _______ $156,692.79|
Cash and due from
Banks ______ $104,446.69)
$261,139.48
1
FOR ALL
OIL-STEAM WAVES
The Realistic Permanent
with Ringlette ends
$3.50 Complete i
Annette
BEAUTY SHOPPE
Phone 431
Bridge St
$558,433.57
Liabilities
Capital _______ $25,000.00
Surplus ____ — 50,000.00 j
Undivided Profits 7,646.82
$ 82,646.82
25,000.00
Circulation ______ —.........
-.
450,786.75
Deposits —-......... ............... .....
$558,433.57
J. A. Thornburgh, President
R. G. Thornburgh, Cashier
Th* banks of Cacha county have
agreed to subscribe to an award
fund, which will be presented to five
winners as follows: first prize,
$35.00; second prize, $25.00; third
prize, $20.00; fourth prize, $12.50;
fifth prize, $7.50.
In addition to the cash prizes,
every farmer customer enrolled,
who scores sixty per cent or more,
will be awarded a special certificate
Issued by the Clearing House Asso­
ciation and the Extension Service
jointly in cooperation with the Agri­
cultural Committee of the Utah
Bankers Association.
The scoring will be done on the
following basis:
Farm and home account records
(accurate and complete)... .50%
Success of year's operations as
brought out in the summary of
the year’s business..................I 25%
General appearance of farm and
improvements and condition
of livestock and poultry,
(judging to be done during
the summer months).............. 25%
The contest will end December $1.
1933. The judge« will be the County
Agent, the County Key Banker, a
representative of the Clearing House
Association, and two representa­
tives selected by the Extension Di­
vision of the College.
returned from an extended tour
through Idaho and California.
They attended the wedding of
L. G. Mecklem while in Idaho,
and the bride and groom accom­
panied them home.
The F. E. Malmstens are mov-
ing into their new home.
PAGE THREE
Natal
Mr«. Jake Neurer
I
Deeds took in a dance at Clats­
kanie Saturday evening.
Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Neurer
arrived from Seattle Sunday at
the home of his uncle, Jake
Neurer. Miss Bernice Holmes and
Kenneth were married last week
in Seattle at the home of the
bride’s sister and brother-in-law,
Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd Bailey. The
young couple will be at home in
Astoria after August 1.
Mr. and Mrs. Lee Osborn have
aa a house guests for a few days
Mrs. Cole from Grants Pass, Ore.,
an aunt of Mr. Osborn. Mrs. Cole
is also a sister of Mrs. Julia
Whittig in this valley.
Mrs. Mary Burris and her
granddaughter, Miss Beatrice Per­
ry, were shoppers in Vernonia
Friday morning.
Anna Osborn and her guest,
Mrs. Cole, spent Monday after­
noon calling on Mrs. Mary Pet­
erson and Mrs. Noble Dunlap.
The Natal school board held a
meeting Wednesday evening, this
being the first since the election
of new directors.
Mr. and Mrs. William Baker
and their two children, Thelma
and Leonard, from Sherwood and
Mrs. Sidney Baker and her sons
Vernon and Edward and daughter
Loretta from Treharne spent Sun­
day visiting their brother and
sister-in-law, Mrs. and Mrs. Jake
Neurer.
Mr. and Mrs. Ira Peterson and
two children and Mrs. Nettie Pet­
erson and Mr. and Mrs. Jake
Neurer were in Clatskanie last
week on business.
Lincoln Peterson is sick, suf-
fering a bad attack of lumbago
in the past week.
¿¿•oo Grace Carmichael kept
house last week for Dave Mc­
Mullen and his three children
while Mrs. McMullen attended the
Mrs. J. A. Hughes is recover­
funeral of her father, John Estes, ing from a broken leg sustained
in Yakima, Wash.
in a fall June 30. She is out on
Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Goodin of crutches, and hopes that the cast
Cornelius drove through to As­ may be taken off Sept. 1.
toria last week to spend a night
Bill Nissen is driving Mrs. C.
with Judge and Mrs. Cornelius. Kilby’s star route while Mr. and
Mrs. Goodin and Mrs. Cornelius Mrs. Kilby are on a vacation tour
are sisters. On their way home in Canada.
Friday they had lunch with Mr.
Mr. and Mrs. C. S. Hoffman ar­
and Mrs. Jake Neurer.
rived Sunday from their summer
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Hambly home at McKenzie Bridge. Fish­
from Riverview were business vis­ ing was fine when they first
itors here Saturday.
went there July 1, Mr. Hoffman
Mrs. Mary Peterson and her reports, but is not so good now.
niece, Mrs. Halliman, and two They plan to return there in a
children were the guests of Mrs. day or so.
Bob Lindsey Thursday.
A surprise party honored Jackie
John Thomas returned home Heenan, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Thursday from the valley where Jack Heenan, on his tenth birth­
he was called for the death of day, Monday afternoon. A group
his father.
of neighborhood boys helped him
Clyde Johnson had as weekend celebrate.
guests his sister Joanna and her
Mr. and Mrs. J. F. Hetrick,
husband from Portland.
parents of Mrs. E. S. Thompson,
Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence Jepson who have been spending the sum­
from below Mist were visitors mer with the Thompson family,
here on Sunday.
started for their home in Texas
Billie Carmichael and Floyd 1 Wednesday.
Marcus Brown broke his arm
Friday while cranking a Ford.
• *•**•*
J. H. Sell sustained a broken
nose when hit yesterday by a
cable that he was loosening from
a stump. He said it didn’t hurt
much.
e e e e
Jack Childs celebrated his
fourth birthday July 25 with a
party.
• • • • * *
Mr. and Mrs. John Krmick of
There was an open-air initia­ North Plains were in Vernonia
tion ceremony of the Vernonia last week looking for a location.
NOTICE OF RESALE OF REAL PROPERTY BID IN BY COLUM­
Order of the K. K. K. Friday
BIA COUNTY AT TAX SALE
night. Two large fiery crosses
THE
were burning and a large Ameri­
Notice is hereby given that the undersigned Sheriff and Ex-
can flag was made prominent by
Officio Tax Collector of Columbia County, Oregon, by authority of
playing search lights upon it,
an order made and entered by the County Court of Columbia Coun­
Have your children's sewing
ty, Oregon, sitting for the transaction of County business, on the
visible for miles.
done now while materials are
24th day of July, A. D., 1933, will offer for sale at public auction
low priced. We do children’s
for cash certain pieces and parcels of real property located in Co­
sewing exclusively and our
'Everyone that could get aboard
lumbia Countv. Oregon, heretofore bid in by said County at a tax
went in touring cars, trucks, se­ prices are reasonable.
foreclosure sale and to which said Coupty now holds a deed by vir­
Dre««e« with Pantie« -
.50
tue of said sale; that said real property will be sold to the highest
dans and roadsters to St. Helens
Up to Size 6
and
best bidder for cash but in no event for a less sum than set out
Sunday to accompany the Verno­ Petticoat« ------- .20
opposite each respective piece or parcel hereinafter described; and
nia ball team. All went the new
Bloomer* or Pantie« - - - .15
said property to be sold beinif described as follows, to-wit:—
ent-off road over St. Helens Hemstitching done while you
wait,
5c
yard
—
except
silk.
Description of Real Property______________________________ Amount
mountain and made the beautiful
Located in
drive in an hour and a half.
Spitzenberg, L. 13, B. 2 ............................ ..................................... . $
Paterson’s Furniture Store
Spitzenberg, L. 3, B. 8 ............................ ..................................... .
Spitzenberg, L. 8, B. 8 ..................................................................
Dorothy Throop and Merle Mills
Spitzenberg, EH L. 10, 11, 12, 13 B. 8 ...................................
are spending two weeks with
Apple Valley Scappoose Orchard Tracts, Tract 12 ..........
their grandma, Mrs. E. R. Throop
Scappoose Orchard Tracts No. 3, Tract 13 ............................
at Beaverton.
Greenwood Annex to Scappoose L. 1 and 10, B. 3 ...............
« * « • «
Watts Addition to Scappoose, L. 1, B. 8 ...................................
Printing, ordered
Watts Addition to Scappoose, L. 8, B. 8 ..............................
Benita Parker and Lillian Con-
today, can be de­
Watts Addition to Scappoose, L. 3, B. 7 ...................................
dit left Saturday to attend camp
Watts Addition to Scappoose, L. 4, B. 7 ..............................
livered tomorrow
meeting at Jennings Lodge.
Watts Addition to Scappoose, S. 40 feet of L. 6, B. 11 ......
NH
of NWH. except amount as described in Book 37 on
if you wish it
Page 462 in Deed Records of Columbia County, Ore­
Mrs. H. J. Buffmire and little
gon, Sec. 3, T. 3, R. 2.......................'..................................... 120.00
daughter, with Mrs. Buffmire’s
WH of SEH. WH of NEH of SEH, and WH of WH of
father, G. N. Mecklem, recently
SEH of SEH, Sec. 6, T. 3, R. 2 ...................................... 105.00
NWH of NWH, Sec. 11, T. 3, R. 2 ....................................... 200.00
EH of SEH of NWH, Sec. 10, T. 4, R. 2 ............................ 100.00
NEH of SWH of NEH, Sec. 16, T. 4, R. 2 .......................
40.00
NH'of NWH of NEH and NWH of NEH of NEH, Sec.
20, T. 4. R. 2 ......................................................................... 100.00
WH of NWH and SEH of NWH and NWH of NEH of
NWH and SH of NEH of NWH, Sec. 20, T. 4, R. 2 .. 450.00
NWH of NEH of SEH and NEH of NWH of SEH
Sec. 20 T 4 R. 2
45.00
EH of NWH of NWH of NE.H Sec. 21",T\ "i, R.’ i”"""“ 40.00
■
BARBER
DR.
J.
A.
HUGHES
NEH
of
SEH
of
NEH,
Sec
21,
T.
4,
R.
2
...............................
20.00
JOY
SHOP
1.95 acres as described in Book 35 op Page 14 in Deed
Physician and Surguon
Records of Columbia County, Oregon, Sec. 27, T. 4, R. 2
9.00
Haircutting for Men
SH of SEH and SH of SWH and NEH of SEH,
Women ana Children
Office Phone 663
Vernonia,
Sec. 28, T. 4, R. 2 .................................................................. 3900.00
Res. Phone 664
Oregon
“
-----
40.00
Expert Work Guaranteed
EH of ......................
SEH of NWH, Sec.
1, T. 4, R. 3
WH of SEH of NWH, Sec. 1, T. 4, R. 3
50.00
5/9 interest in SH of NEH, Sec. 1, T. 4, R. 3 ................. 100.00
5/9 interest in SWH and SHl of NWH and SW H of
Ringlette Permanent Waves at
NEH and NWH of SEH, Sec. 12, T. 4, R. 3 ........ 300.00
$3.50 and $4.50
H. M. BIGELOW
st. Helens, L. 10, B. 16 .............................................................
19.00
MILADY’S BEAUTY SHOPPE
DENTIST
28.00
st. Helens, L. 11, B. 16 .............................................................
St. Helens, L. 3, B. Í
68.00
Mr«. E. H. Turner
Joy Theatre Building
50.00
st. Helens, L. 5, B. Í
Vernonia Hotel Bldg.
St. Helens, L. 8, Br 64
95.00
Vernonia - - - Oregon
492 Bridge St.
Phone 1261
29.00
st. Helens, L. 6, B. 65
30.00
Helens,
L.
9,
B.
65
....
st.
"
27.00
st. Helens, L. 16, B. 65
21.00
St. Helens, L. 18, B. H
Willard Batteries
18.00
St. Helens, L. 19, B. 78
VIOLET RAY GASOLINE
St. Helens, L. 20, B. 78
18.00
JOHN A. MILLER
.
. .BBS®®
...................._____
Oil« . . . Expert Greasing
L. 21,
B. 78
Helens,
18.00
St.
Helens,
Undivided
interest
in
L.
1,
B.
86
...
10.00
General Contractor
VERNONIA
St. Helens, Undivided interest in L. 2, B. 86 .
10.00
St. Helens, Undivided interest in L. 3, B. 86
10.00
SERVICE STATION
Mason Work, Building
St. Helens, Undivided interest in L. 4, B. 86
10.00
VIIUIVIUVU
llltvlvot
111
A.
J,
O
vl
Helens,
st.
Undivided interest in L. 6, B. 86
10.00
st. Helens, Undivided interest in L. 6, B. 86
10.00
st. Helens, L. 1, B. 87 .........................................
14.00
Roland L. Treharne
St. Helens, L. 2,
‘ B. 87
" ........
14.00
St. Helens, L. 3, B. 87 ........
14.00
Expert Automobile Repairing
BAFFORD BROS
Helens,
L.
4,
B.
87
........
St.
14.00
WELDING
St. Helens, L. 19, B. 87
14.00
L.
Helens,
St.
20,
B.
87
14.00
General Plumbing
TWIN FIR service
St. Helens, L. 21, B. 87 ......
UnnBHarnni STATION
14.00
Vernonia
St. Helens, L. 22, B. 87 ......
14.00
St. Helens, L. 2, B. 89
12.00
12.00
St Helens, L. 3, B. 89 ......
St. Helens, L. 4, B. 89 ........
12.00
St. Helens, L. 5, B. 89
12.00
Roland D. Eby, M. D.
St. Helens, L. 6, B. 89 .......
12-00
St. Helens, I.. 7, B. 89 ........
12.00
Helens,
8,
B.
89
........
12.00
St.
I.
Physican and Surgeon
W. A. DAVIS, Proprietor
12.00
St. Helens, L. 9, B. 89 .....
12.00
St Helens, L. 10, B. 89
Town Of fies 891
St. Helena, L. 11, B. 89 ....
12.00
12.00
St. Helena, L. 12, B. 89 ...
Offiea with Crawford
L.
Helena,
12.00
St.
"
13, B. 89 ...
Phone
Res. Phone
Motor Co.
B. ov
St. Helens, L. 14, D.
89 .....
12.00
Walnut 7586 Walnut 2911
St. Helens, L. 15, B. 89
relaphone« ____ *11» 1041
12.00
12.00
B. I«
St. Helens, L. . 16, -------
Willard H. HerUy, D. M. D.
St Helena, L. 17, B. 89
12.00
DENTISTRY
St. Helens, L. 18, B. 89
12.00
VERNONIA EAGLE
Helens,
L.
St
19,
B.
89
12.00
1729 Denver Ave. at Kilpat­
$1.00 a year temporarily
Helens,
L,
20,
B.
89
.
12.00
St.
rick St., Portland, Ore.
Act NOW I
(Continued on Page Four)
Jonnibel Shoppe
• •
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