Vernonia eagle. (Vernonia, Or.) 1922-1974, January 12, 1928, Page 5, Image 5

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    Thursday, January 12, 1927
VERNONIA EAGLE
FIVE
Ben Stoloff.
Alaska and Hawaii Join at V. of O
Gresham claims the most beauti­
results, Farmers’ Bulletin 1449-F,
Selection of Cotton Fabrics, will ful 12-room rural school.
give you considerable information
Irene Rich, in her new Warner about the best materials for vari­
| In the County Court of the State
Brothers’ picture, “Don’t Tell the ous purposes.
of Oregon For Columbia County
Wife,” which comes to the Rose
The nearer your dish closet is j NOTICE OF FINAL ACCOUNT
theatre on Sunday, is cast as a
to your sink, the fewer steps need-'
sophisticated young Parisian matron
IN THE MATTER OF THE
ed to put the dishes away after J
who, in a series of whimsically swift
ESTATE OF
and amusing happenings finds her they are washed. An ideal way is i J. P. SHEELEY, DECEASED.
to
have
the
dish
closet
in
the
con-
beloved and gallivanting husband
Notice is hereby given that the
has been led in a direction that necting wall between the dining undersigned administratrix of the
room
and
kitchen,
adjacent
to the
is nearly astray through succumb­
sink on the kitchen side, Clean estate of J. P. Sheeley, deceased,
ing to the almost international pre­
has filed her final account in the
dishes are taken out in the dining
ference for blondes.
matter and court above mentioned,
room, and used ones are passed
-—
through the closet to be washed and that Monday the 16th day of
Tip Toea
January, 1928 at the hour of 2
Al and Hen, Yankee vaudevillians and put away without an unneces­ o’clock p.m. of said day, has been
dead-broke in London, plot to mar- sary step.
fixed as the time, and the court
Fresh coffee stains may often be room of the court above entitled in
ry “Tip-Toea,” their pretty dancing
partner to young Lord William removed from tablecloths and other Columbia County Court house at
and his fortune under pretense white goods by pouring boiling wa­ St. Helens, Oregon, the place for
that she is their wealthy niece. ter on them from a height of 2 the hearing of objections to said
When his Lordship discovers their or 3 feet. Stretch the part stained final account and the settlement
perfidy and arrest threatens, “Tip- over a bowl which will catch the thereof.
Toes,” who has fallen in love with water. The last traces of the stain \V. A. Harris, Attorney. Ellen Shee­
him, manages to convince him of can usually be removed by wash- ley Administratrix.
the sincerity of her love—which ing with soap and water. If the
Date of first publication Dec. 15,
changes everything. How she dances stains are on wool or silk nxa- 1927.
them all out of jail and into a terial, sponge with cold or luke- .Date of last publication Jan. 12,
happy home forms a surprise finish warm water. If a grease spot 1928.
to a lively story Monday “Tip-Toes” from the cream remains after the
spot has dried, remove it by using
comes to the Rose theatre.
Vernonia Post
one of the grease solvents, such
“Galloping Fury”
&"9’ American Le-
as gasoline, carbon tetrachloride,
gion. Meets second
The world’s greatest Western chloroform, either, naphtha, or
comedian—Hoot Gibson!
fourth Tues-
benzol. Old stains often require the
days each month, 8
This is the title unanimously be­ use of special chemicals.
p.m. W. H. Hurley,
stowed upon the hard-riding, hard-
What is the biggest need or de­
Commander.
laughing western star who is com­ sire for the coming year? An auto­
ing Tuesday and Wednesday to mobile? A home of your own? A
the Rose theatre in Universal’s good vacation? Radio? School or
“Galloping Fury.”
Regular communi-
college graduation? More or better
cation
first and
clothes? Make out you spending
"A Little Journey”
third Wednesdays
plan with an eye to whatever you
of each
month.
Claire Windsor, William Haines
want most; then see how you can
All visiting sisters
and Harry Carey are featured in
subordinate less important needs
and brothers wel­
“A Little Journey,” a new Metro-
or wants Co get the one big thing.
come.
Goldwyn-Mayer picture directed by
For example two dollars a week
Robert Z. Leonard, which comes to
Catherine
McNeill,
W. M.
saved from January 1 to July will
the Rose theatre Thursday and Fri­
take care of commencement at Leona McGraw, Secretary.
day. This novel film, a picturiza-
high school, or provide a two-
tion of the Rachel Crothers stage
week’s vacation for mother, or
Mountain Heart
success, relates in amusing and
bring some splendid books into the Rebekah Lodge No. 243
dramatic fashion the adventures en­
house. Two dollars a week ana No. 243, I.O.O.F., meets every sec­
countered by a young girl in cross­
sometimes more can be trimmed ond and fourth Thursdays in
ing the continent. Almost all of
from ordinary expenditures with Grange hall, Vernonia. Visitors al­
the scenes take place in a train.
surprising ease, once the whole ways welcome.
Scale insects on jumper are con­ family starts cooperating in the
Mrs. Viola Treharne, N.G.
trolled by sprays of lime sulfur, game of "Beat the Budget” Big­
Mrs. Hazel Thompson, Sec.
10 to 12 gallons of concentrated ger wants take more weekly sav­
solution in 100 gallons of water, ings, but the principle is the same.
according to Oregon experiment
Myrtle Point—State Security bank
J. MASON DILLARD
authorities. Applications are made
pays 75 per cent dividend.
in the dormant season, This pest
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW
is not serious in Oregon but is
Next to Carkin Cleaning Works
often hard to control.
Here Every Wednesday
t i ei
Very early spring application of
land plaster on legumes has been
given good results at the Oregon
fully guaranteed, sold at
DR. ELLA WIGHT
experiment station.
these remarkably low
DR. C. J. WIGHT
The strawberry root weevil can
prices
be controlled by poison bait, says
CHIROPRACTORS
the entomologist of the Oregon ex-/- .30x3)4 Cl. Cord ..................... $7.35
Blood Pressure Examination
périment station. This bait is made (A big tire, certain to give lowei* Rheumatism, Neuritis, Stomach,
up by mixing 95 pounds of dried cost per mile.
Liver and Intestinal Troubles
$8.75
Delayed Menstruation
applye refuse with 5 pounds of 29x4.40 Balloon
calcium arsenate, or by a bran (Unsurpassed at any price)
-■=
bait developed at the experiment 31x5.00 Balloon (30x4.95) $12 90
(A
double oversize
for
29x4.40.
station.
LESTER SHEELEY
Many seasons of the year are Can be used on either drop center
suitable for clover seeding, Feb­ or regular rims)
Attorney-at-Law
ruary plantings usually give the 30x5 Heavy Duty Cord, 8 ply..........
$24.65 Vernonia
best results. About 12 pounds of
Oregon
red ¿lover or 8 pounds of alsike (Best for the long haul or the
i
are the recommended seedings. The short haul)
most common practice and a good 32x6 Heavy Duty Cord ... $39.75
DR. W. H. HURLEY
one is to seed the clover on fall (A new truck tire to fit 30x5
rim«)
sown grain,, particularly barley.
DENTISTRY AND X-RAY
Evenings by Appointment
Be sure to use T. I. E. D.
“Inside” Information
over Brown Furniture Store.
Large Size. Office
A weathertight house is essential Red Tubes.
Vernonia
Oregon
to the economical operation of a Heavy gauge. Tough age­
heating plant. Do you need storm resisting compound. Easily
sash? Weather strips? Calking ma­
repaired.
M. D. COLE
I
terials?
i
TUBE
One of the nicest ways of serv­ 30x314 (Will fit either nominaler
ing Jerusalem artichones is
ep
DENTIST
giant casing) ........................... $1.60
casserole. They should be pared 29x4.40 (Will fit either regular
and placed in a baking dish either
or drop center equipmt......... $2.05 Vernonia
Oregon
whole or sliced, Cover closely and 31x5.00 (Can be used
in either
bake in a slow oven until done, or
31x5.00 or
30x4.95
casings)....
MARK EVERY GRAVE
about one-half to one hour. Remove
$2.65
.......................................
v
the cover of the baking dish to­ 30x5 (Will withstand hard service Memorials in Granite and Marble
At Reduced Prices
ward the close to dry out excess
and the heat of long hauls $3.50
WRITE FOR PARTICULARS
moisture. Season with butter, salt,
32x6( To be used only in 32x6
MRS. M. N. LEWIS & CO.
and pepper. If liked, add grated
casings designed for 30x5 rims) Fourth and MAin St.
Hillsboro.
cheese or buttered crumbs or both,
If you plan a few white dresses
for next summer, you can take If you want the right ti
W. O. W. Vernonia camp No. 655
advantage of the January white or tube for your car ai
meets every Monday night at sevea
sales, and gain a little time in complete
satisfaction <
thirty at the Grange Hall. Visiting
making them up before the bulk your tire purchases,
de
members welcome.
of the spring sewing is under way.
with
—
ROBERT LINDSEY, C. C.
As white garments have to be
C. C. DUSTEN CLERK.
CRAWFORD MOTOR
laundered frequently, be sure to
COMPANY
choose materials with a firm close
Vernonia Lodge, No. 184 A.
weave, and soft texture, for best Vernonia,
F. & A. M., meets at Grange
Hall every Second and
Fourth Thursday nights.
Visitors Welcome
Levert Goodin, Secretary.
Don’t Tell The Wife”
1
I H ■
1
The outstanding econcmio pro-
em of tiie Northwest is* the co t
t.anspori.’.tion in the opinion of
V. \-yi.e E. Eu
.h. tTSBI . .1-
tlon authority and le purer. !:i tin
school ;! t .iiaeis of the Universi­
ty o’ Minnesota.
"Neither tiie s
carriers of the
been making mo:
»¡tippets and car
t ons of the con
i sr.’J In a rac
Eut
o:ut t
L à L
' i
Group of Oregon co eds. Including one from Hawaii and one from
Alaska. Left to right—Eleanor Poorman. Portland; Dorothy Davidson,
Waimea, Kauai, Hawaii; Florence Hurley, Enterprise; Mildred Carolyn
Johnson, Kuskokwim, Alaska.
i
5
UNIVERSITY OF OREGON, Eu­ grew up, and went to Lihue, thirty
gene.—“East meets West” is common miles away, to the high school that is
enough, but when the zero dress of farthest west of any in what is technic­
northern Alaska appears alongside the ally the United States. Here, in the
ventilated grass garb of tropical little town surrounded by plantation
Hawaii, we scent adventure. Here, at and sea, she and nine other white
the University of Oregon, by chance, students clashed wits with 390 orientals.
are two girls, Dorothy Davidson, born
Dorothy loves the land of her birth;
in faraway Waimea Kauai, and with the colorful Waimea gorge, like our
her, Mildred Carolyn Johnson, of Butte, own Grand Canyon, and the restless
Montana, who recently returned from sugar-cane fields. She loves the vivid,
the desolate Kushokwim river country short-lived hibiscus, with its delicate
in the Alaskan interior.
blossoms that live only for a day, and
Halfway between the Alaskan and the sensitive Cereus that bloomg only
Seward peninsu'as the little school- at night.
marm labored at teaching an all­ The petite Mildred loves the Alaskan
Eskimo school the mysterious pot-hooks atmosphere. Even though her experi­
of the English language. Hers is a ence was one of hardest work and
story of glare-ice and blinding snow, economic difficulty—such as finding
of Malamute dog teams, cold, rainbow the water pitchers frozen tight of
fans of Northern lights, and the death­ mornings—something about the country
toll of spring thaws on the Kiskokwim. grips her. In night school she had old
Dorothy ’s story deals with pineapples, men and women who wore their stringy
with warm-colored hibiscus flowers, and hair down over their shoulders; in day
sun-flooded sand dunes.
school she taught the alphabet to un­
The blonde bobs of both girls con­ ruly youngsters with scriptural names,
trast vividly with the shiny black
Many other experiences make up the
hair of the natives in both countries; background of memories in the educa-
and both stories tell of the wljite man’s tion of the two blonde girls who are
economic and cultural struggle among continuing their studies at the Univer­
sity .where they are both freshmen. “I
these branch-children of Asia.
Miss Davidson’s home is on the Hawi- should love to go to Alaska,” Dorothy
ian coast within sound of the conti­ told her companion when the two met
nental lapping of waves, and always for the first time. “And I,” Mildred
before her, «he had a panorama of the replied with her courteous little smile,
varied blue tints of the water. She | “have always wanted to go to Hawaii.”
Gold Beach—Public Utilities Co.1 quille Myrtle Point Camas Moun­
organized with $60,000 capital, for tain road.
general public service.
Free mail delivery to begin at
Klamath Falls—Hovery and Wal- Coquille, about March 1.
ker pine tracts will be opened in ! Fifteen Tillamook county school
1928 if lumber market improves, j districts will build
union
high
Coquille—State plans to oil Co- I school at Cloverdale.
NEW BATTERIES $9.85
Old Batteries Taken in T rade
Now is the time of year your battery should be
kept fully charged and in tip top shape.
<
Your battery recharged, painted acid
$150
proof, paint and acid adjusted, all for ..
Radio batteries and others not requiring $100
removal of installation m car
Rent batteries, per day
25c
Motor C
Feed, Fuel and Hay
uilding Materials
4
Dupont Powder
During the Winter Months when Heavier Feed­
ing is necessary, you can be sure of uniform quality
r
I
7 hese wo.'.lrt bar ■
ittc: bau,
rnlrgs i
m eni
tes.
Ccngr
tree Ccmrnl
te steps which
fie volu.oe o’ tr
Northwest rrliw
(1) That the Cor i
t ’.ant the railways per —.iss'oti t >
reduce ratC3 on tremseontine it l
traffic sutil tently to divert ■ i
of the wa ir tr lo 1 ack to t.-s
railways; (-’) that Congress shot ' 1
increase the experimental tr! »
now in effect on traffic through
the Panama canal, and (3) t?rj!l
bring highway and waterway C t-
flc under the j'.irledlri.Ion^ of t'n
Interstate Commerce Commission.
The railways are being unfair.y
discriminated against, and this !»
reacting to the dhadvautr.ga ani
detriment of the Northwest, Mr.
Butterbaugh believes.
Transportation costs can ha de­
creased by permitritig voluntary
consolidation. He h.-.s no fear»
about restricting competition.
“Under present strong govern­
ment regulations competition Is not
at all necessary,” he said- “On t'.’.e
c her hand It Is out-and-out wr.s e.
“The interests of shippers, car­
rier», and regulatory bedies shou I
be to eliminate waste la transpor­
tation whenever there is a possi­
bility of doing so, and consolida­
tions otter such opportenlti 3. Vol­
untary mergers will enable the
lines to earn the fair ret ms set
by Congress upon their property
valuation as determined by the
Commission.
“Transportation presents us with
our one big economic problem tn
this section of the country. The
leading Industry of the nation, and
of the Northwest is, of course, agri­
culture.
It Is, therefore, not
strange that these two Industrial
giants are closely related—that the
success of one Is, from necessity,
tied with the success of the other.
When one Is depressed the other
is depressed; at.d when one pros-
pars the other la bound to pros-
per.
'Tor this reason the manager« of
our transportation facilities, on t? 3
one hard, and shipper» er.giged in
FpricuRure, In mining, in maim-
f eturirg r:”l In commer-e. on t’”»
r her, should work together and
r.ot at eras p'rposee. Their In­
ta rest» a e not divergent.
“No other region in the United
Srates Is so remote—so Isolated—
s > distant from the high-seas. No
e her region so tesembles the froa-
tier, as does the one immediately
to the west, wl h one-twentieth cf
t le populat’ ;n occupying cne-tenCi
of the national ar-a. No other
region is eo dependent upon far-
distant oceans for the final marite*.-
leg of its products. No other
region Is so much a oae-industry
region.
“No other section of the countrv
has so small a home market, tri
must ship so large a portion of it»
products so far In order to re-ch
the ultimate consumer. No other
region produce so large a volume
of products of a cheap, bulky na­
ture. and hence demanding a Jn-.v
transportation charge. No other
region produces commodlt'es having
a transportation cost at destination
by so large a share of their total
value.
"No other region is so deernde-’t
unon its railroads. No other region
of the United States has so un-
remunerative railroads, and so Im­
poverished shippers.
“The cry Is for cheap transpor­
tation. It Is In connection with
the charges made for railroad ser­
vice that the real problems of tho
Northwest are concerned.
“Briefly stated. the shippers
claim that rates ere too high fnl
should be reduced; end th,? car-
riers claim that rates a-e already
too low, and earnings are not suf-
1 I nt. In truth, both parties are
right. Hence, neither can afford
to malte any further Mcrl.dces for
the other. Neither can look for re-
lief from the other, Something
mu.’t be done for the benefit of
both
"What Is needed is increased
traffic and lower operating costs.
These are two matters that both
the carriers and the public should
constantly strive for.”
Rose Theatre
"The Gay Retreat"
Vernonia Trading Co.
4
“The Gay Retreat,” one of the .
funniest war comedies ever filmed,
comes to the Rose theatre Satur-
day. Sammy Cohen and Ted Mac-
Namtra, the prize pair in “What
Price Glory,” provided many of
the laughs in the picture which
was directed for Fox Films by
A Wonderful Tire
NG D^TANQ
AND TELEGRAPH
Year
The telephone will prove to be your most valuable
and most economical assistant/in the office, work­
shop, home or while traveling.
Oregon Telephone Co
I.O.O.F.—Vernonia Lodge No.
24« meets every Tuesday night
st 8 o’clock, in Grange hall, Vi»-
itors always welcome.
M. E. Graven, N. G.
John Glassner, Secretary.
AMERICAN
LEGION
AUXILIARY
Meet, first and third Mon­
day. of
each
month at
the
Legion
H. E.
Hall,
McGraw, President