Vernonia eagle. (Vernonia, Or.) 1922-1974, January 05, 1928, Page 2, Image 2

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    VERNONIA EAGLE
TWO
Thursday, January 5, 1928.
much to expect that many farmers will not
continue skeptical in spite of the assurance
of the experts.
gin» Rmuinia fcaglr
ECONOMICAL ADVERTISING
Issued every Thursday
$2 per year in Advance
Entered as Second Class Matter, August 4, 1922 at the
Post Office at Vernonia, Oregon, under the
Act of March 3, 1879
MARK E. MOE, Editor
IF EVERYONE BOUGHT HERE
Competition for business is keen and
likely to remain so. This year and the
years following are a time to buy adver­
tising economically, to match in adver­
tising the increased efficiencies of pro­
duction.
Newspaper advertising is low-cost, pro-
ductive, localized advertising. It is the log-
ical aid of business at a time when volume
is large, when hand-to-mouth buying puts
a premium upon flexibiity and control.
Newspaper advertising permits more speed
because it has four-wheel brakes.
Newspaper advertising can be focused
without waste upon the markets of the
greatest buying nation on earth. It reaches
the greatest number of people and its
seed is sowed in fertile soil. That is, the
merchant buying newspaper advertising
space knows it is covering his trade area
and reaching the maximum number of old
and prospective customers in that territory.
The Eagle is leader in this rich market
for advertised goods. Its readers look to
it for shopping information and news of
the cmmercial world, and its advertisers
look to it to apprise the public of shopping
advantages and- opportunities they offer.
Newspaper advertising, and newspaper
advertising alone, can tell everything from
patent medicine to automobiles. It has
done it, is doing it and will continue to
do it.
What would be the dividends payable
to Vernonia if every citizen on December
31, 1928 could truthfully say he or she
had not violated a community resolution
for 1928 to’“buy at home."
The increased business which would ob­
tain for hometown merchants from such
a community resolution might seem incon­
siderable to those who buy seldom if ever
through the mails, but to that person ac­
quainted with postal money order statis­
tics and the numbers of mail order cat­
alogs annually pouring into the resulting
loss to the community is staggering.
At this time, when community coopera­
tion and loyalty are doing so much for
community growth and prosperity, it
seems that an intensive and concerted
campaign for one solid year for 100 per
cent inculcation of the “buying at home”
habit would discover for every community
the hidden “fountain of prosperity.”
Presupposing that the mail order cata­
log cover has been clamped down tightly
for one year by the whole community the Business Development Follows Telephone
probable benefits which would accrue to
the community are amazing. Firstly, thous­ America
nerica owes its industrial and social
ands of dollars annually shipped out of growl th largely to the telephone. All of
town would puui into home town stores.! i Russia, a country
rnuntrv nf
of 140,000,000 nnnuln-
popula­
Tiie increased business would encourage tion has only half as many telephones as
the merchants to store improvements, the the city of Minneapolis.
purchase of larger stocks, the lowering of, Our national total of 18,000,000 tele­
prices and to otherwise improving service. phones is more than there are in all other
The benefit to the pubic of better stores, countries combined.
larger stocks, lower prices and better ser­ Each day 72,000,000 telephone calls
vice is obivious. Business begets business. are completed in the United States. The
It is the busy town which attracts new in­ tremendous effect of this instant inter­
dustries, new business, new citizens, and communication can be easily seen.
new — buildings.
--
------- o Population
1 ------ - increases
—-— ——_~ - and In imagination look back fifty \ years;
ecu o ,
building improvements distribute the tax it seems impossible that business could ex­
burden over a larger area, lightening it ¡st and flourish with the communication
for the individual.
disadvantages the pioneer had to meet.
Is there anyone who doubts that Ver- The telephone has changed all that, and
nonia would be a bigger and better town our leadership over other nations has in­
to live in in 1929 if everybody bought at creased, seemingly, in direct ratio to our
home in 1928?
telephone development.—Manufacturer.
DISCREDITING MOON FARMING
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Bank of Vernonia
3
12 Can Limit
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Fruit
Peaches, Penis,
appk or Aprica.s
Fancy Oregons
40-50 Size
25c
Cans ....
Canned
Prunes
Carnation Brand
Made in Oregon
B
dred of earnest, ambitious
men and women added to
thp organization, The pub-
lie has shown marked ap­
preciation of our efforts to
serve efficiently and eco­
nomically, and we enter
1928 with full confidence.
Friday, Saturday and
January 6, 7, 9
Milk
Cans ......
34c 4
IDoz. ass’t.
Cani
97c
4 Pounds
13 Pounds
Oysters
$240
Canned
Fancy Figs
American Beauty
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V
a **
3 Cans ...............
4-JC
White or Black. Na­ Peas, Corn, Beans or
Tomatoes.
12 c.................. $172 ture health food.
4 Cans ..........
49c
3 Pounds
27c 9/5 Cans ass’t.
“ * Case
Tuna Fish
$268
25ib. box
$210
Mission Brand
Light Meat
3
6
43 c
Cans
79c
Cans
Saimón
S02p
Raisins
I
White Wonder
Sultana Seedless, Eat
them for the iron.
Ounce
Bottle
Red Sockeye
2
6
Spuds
65c
$190 Yakima Netted Gems
Cans ....
Cans ....
100
Flour
Rice
Big K Brand. Money
Back guarantee.
8 Lb.
bag ...............
Roilecs Oats
Milled by Quaker Oat
Company
9 Lb.
bag ...............
Fancy Long Grain
Louisiana
53c
Eastern
49C
$143
bag,
11,.
10 Pounds..........
100 lb. bag...
63c
$625
Beans
Genuine Small Navy.
95c
10 Pounds.....
23c
batches
Guaranteed Cookers
Pancake
34c
10 Bars
Pus ex
25c
For
bleaching
and de­
$195 odorizing.
3 Pounds
25 lb. box
Alaska
To question confidence in the almanac It is most appropriate for men of means
when it comes to planting is still regard­ to make a gift to an obscure community
ed as almost sacrilege by many an old- which is their birthplace, of a model “lit­
fashioned farmer. Unless the “sign” is tle red schoolhouse.”
right, he is sure that it will be useless for Sometimes a successful man makes a
him to attempt to get a crop.
donation extending the magnitude of the
The federal department of agriculture gift into many thousands of dollars. That
has issued an almanac for farmers, and was the case with Owen D. Young, who
this almanac contains a somewhat serious gave such a school to his native village,
attack on the ideas of persons who ad-.Van Hornesville, New York,
' , where he
here to the moon lore for farming and began life at the bottom of the ladder.
gardening. This almanac will have the
He wanted this school to represent a
approval of the modern farmer who has step upward from the little one-room
adopted business like methods in his farm­ single teacher school of his boyhood, and
ing operations.
to be the kind of a school he did not have
’ Don t play by the moon,” the almanac as a boy.
says, “but get the best seed and prepare He has set a splendid example to men
the seed bed, then plant when soil and of means who owe their success in life
moisture conditions are right.” Good sense to the simplicity and soundness of rural'
certainly, but how are you going to con- life as a builder of character.—Manufac-
vince the man who has a moon aimanac turer.
I
hanging in the kitchen?
The farmer who plants by the moon The only music typically American is
sometimes makes out a good case for him­ that made by the mocking bird, the sax­
self, in spite of agriculture insists that the ophone and the cash register.
preparation of the seed bed and planting
at a time when conditions of heat and The Chicago University investigator
moisture are the most favorable, with who declares that the Apostle Paul had
proper cultivation, will insure good crops, a stenographer who took his epistles in
regardless of w hat the moon almanacs say. shorthand may discover on further exam-
Students in agricultural schools and some ination that they were written on a type­
farmers may believe that, but it is too writer.
Use a Safe Deposit Box for
safeguarding your valuables
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“THE LITTLE RED SCHOOLHOUSE”
BE SAFE
Nineteen twenty-seven was
kind to us.
Two more
states, Kansas and New
Mexico, were added to
those we serve; nearly 200
new units opened; sales a-
mounted to approximately
75 million dollars and hun-
Safeway Brand
6bx
19c
carton
Preserves
Strawberry, Peach
Apricot and Pineapple.
3 pound
jar ________ 69c
Catsup
Made from choice ripe
Tomatoes.
3 Bottles
47c
....
6 Bottle Limit
n '
Safeway .
ci features
We own and operate the markets n ou - ores ourselves. Every piece
of meat we offer for sale is elected 1. » " ' :.ving experts and the quality
is absolutely guaranteed. The i v a plie- -; • e the
_____________
result of our tremendous
purchases and scientifically economical methods of operating. Here you
can buy the finest of both fresh and cured meats at astonishing savings.
Visit our markets and note their clean, sanitary appearance.
Roast Pork
Í
CJ
Í
Í
Bacon
Young and Tender
Shoulder, Per Pound ..
20c
Legs, Per Pound
25c
Small Squares
3 to 5 Pounds
Per Pound ....................
B
i
B
19c
*
Shortening
Hams
Skinned No Waste
1 •» or Whole
Per Pound ...................... 27c
Snow Cap
2 Pounds for ...............
g ....Pounds for
32c
$125
We Deliver all Orders Free
Store 225
Vernonia
Phone 711
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