Seaside signal. (Seaside, Or.) 1905-current, September 16, 2016, Page 9, Image 19

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    CHEERLEADING
SCHOOL SPIRIT? YES THEY DO!
By Katherine Lacaze
Seaside Signal
Seaside’s cheerleading
program is looking forward
to an exciting season after
getting certiied by the Ore-
gon School Activities Asso-
ciation ahead of the 2016-
17 school year.
It was only two years
ago the high school’s cheer-
leaders started being able to
letter, and fourth-year head
coach Kimm Mount has
been working toward the
program’s OSAA certiica-
tion relentlessly during her
tenure.
With Mount and assis-
tant coaches Amy Rider
and Savannah Cozart head-
ing the squad of 16 talented
students – 14 females and
two males – the program is
EO MEDIA GROUP/FILE PHOTO
Cheerleaders work on their moves.
looking strong for the start
of the season.
“I think we have the best
team, the strongest team
we’ve ever had,” Rider
said.
All students are welcome
to participate in the team,
but to cheer on the sidelines
during games, they must
meet a benchmark during
evaluations, which test
students individually and
in groups as they perform
certain routines and move-
ments. Evaluations for this
year were held Aug. 24, but
any students who didn’t hit
the mark the irst time can
be reevaluated at will.
The coaches are in the
process of selecting cap-
tains to lead this year’s
squad, Rider said. All the
students, however, are
expected to demonstrate
leadership qualities as part
of their involvement in the
program.
“As a team, our goal is
to support the school and
the community, and be role
models for other young
people,” Rider said.
The team generally
performs during football
games, assemblies and oth-
er events; there is the pos-
sibility they will perform
during half-time for some
basketball games this year,
Rider said. The cheerlead-
ers also support the high
school’s other clubs and
activities by doing locker
decorations for participat-
ing students. Additionally,
the program emphasizes the
cultivation of conidence,
teamwork,
collaboration
and communication skills.
Senior Ian McCrary
joined the squad two years
ago compelled by a desire
to do something out of the
ordinary. Because of his
experience, he said, “I’m
more courageous in trying
new things.”
“I wasn’t expecting to
get a kick out of it,” he said,
adding, “I’ve grown more
as a person by doing it.”
Being part of a fe-
male-dominated sport has
taught him how to treat
women and better interact
with them in positive, pla-
tonic ways, he said. It also
has introduced him to neg-
ative stereotypes he didn’t
encounter before and he is
learning how to deal men-
tally with that experience.
Junior Sydney Ordway
agreed receiving slurs and
stereotypes can be a stress-
ful aspect to cheerleading,
but she tries to remember
they are founded on igno-
rance and rise above the
negativity.
“We try not to let it get
us down,” McCrary agreed.
Besides, Ordway said, the
squad’s hard work, dedica-
tion and talent is demonstrat-
ed without words “when we
go on the ield.” As the team
strengthens, they add more
dificult stunts and advanced
routines. More than any-
thing, the coaches encourage
them to perform at their indi-
vidual best, she said.
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Seagull Pride • Fall 2016 • Seaside Signal/Cannon Beach Gazette • 9