Herald and news. (Klamath Falls, Or.) 1942-current, January 03, 1964, Page 4, Image 4

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    AGE I Friday, January 3, 1964
HERALD AND NEWS, Klamath rails, Ore.
MARKETS and FINANCE
Stocks
NEW YORK STOCKS
By United Preu International
Allied Chemical
Alum Co lAm
American Air Lines
American Can
American Motors
AT&T
.American Tobacco
Anaconda Copper
Armco
American Standard
Avco CP
Bendix Corp
Bethlehem Steel
; Boeing Air
Brunswick
Caterpillar Corp
Chrysler Corp
Coca Cola
CBS.
Columbia Gas
Continental Can
Crown Zellerbach
Crucible Steel
Dow Chemical
Eastman Kodak
Firestone
.Ford
,-Gen Dynamics
General Electric
General Foods
General Motors
S3'.
43 'i
17.
139
28'i
4H'
m
18'j
22'i
48'.
33
37H
12
43:Ii
83',
113
76.
28'.
42'!i
54ii
23
69
116
373i
505.
24
BS
90 'i
79'.
General Portland Cement 22r
Georgia CPacific
Gt Nor Ry
Greyhound
Gulf Oil
Homestake
Idaho Power
IBM.
Int Paper
Johns Manville
Kejineeott Copper
Lockheed Aircraft
Martin
Merck
Montana Power
Montgomery Ward
Nat'l Biscuit
New York Central
Northern Natural Gas
Northern Pacific
Penney JjC. xd
PennIRR
' Permanente Cement
'Phillips
Procter Gamble
Radio Corporation
Richfield Oil
Safeway
Sears
Shell Oil
Socony (Mobil Oil
Southern Co ' ,
Southern Pacific
Sperry Rand
, Standard California
' Standard Indiana ,
Standard N.J.
Stokely Van Camp
Sun Mines
' Texas Co.
Texas Gulf Sulfur
52
57 'A
45 ',
47.
45'.
32
510
323,
50'.
74'4
36
20 .
110".
38 'A
MVt
5671
2S'i
50
S2'A
45'A
26'.
16'.
49(4
79'A
101 '4
41
59 V
07
47
72
55'A
61a,i
mi
fit
7
23 'a
10
69
23
Texas Pacific Land Trust 24',k
Thiokol
Trans America
Trans World Air
Tri-Continental
Union Carbide
Union Pacific
United (Aircraft
United Wr (Lines
U.S. Plywood
U.S. Rubber
U.S. Steel
United Utilities
West Sank Corp
Westinghouse
Weyerhaeuser
Youngslown
18
60
32
46
122
39
42
45
67
, 45
55
39V.
39
34
33
127
LOCAL SECURITIES
Rid Asked
Bank America Oft 68
Boise Cascade 38 35
Cal Pac 26 28
Con Freight 9 ,10
Cyprus Mines 31 13
Equitable S&L 29 31
1st iNat'l Bank 79 83
Jantzen 28 27
Morrison Knud 27 29
Mult Kennels 3 4
NW Natural Gas 33 35
Oregon Melal 1 1
PP&L B3 27
PGE 24 2!i
U.S. Nai l Bank flO'i 94
Tektronix 21 22
West Coast Tel 24 25
Potatoes
PORTLAND 4UPI1 - Potato
market about steady: loo lb.
pks washed Russets U.S. iNo 1
unless otherwise staled; Oregon
2.75-3.00; 6-14 02 3.00-3.25; sized
2 oz. spread 3.75-4.00; bakers
3.00-3.10: U.S. No 2 1.00; few
lower; U.S. (No 2 bakers 2.00-2.25.
TODAY'S POTATO MARKET
I KI.AMATH BASIN "CKNTRAI, ORKUON IDAHO
"DEMAND 2 Klr 'jl,r I CSS
MARKET Stel.v NtTmly SlronRVr "
F.o.n. rnicESEn cwt.
t'SIA t In or 4 ot niln 2.40-2.50 2.20-2.3J "I.!W2T:I0
6' 14 oi .65-!.7S 2.402.50 2.-2JI5
baled 10 lb tkl so-2.tiO sTilfsfTso lli.V3.To
t'S2 il.70 " l.M!n " '"!'.SWL4" '
PRICE TO (iRWR BULK CWT.
LSI . Lf.ll.U5 '' I.5J.I.B ' I n 'Report"
its ,;ti-,r. I" .j,v7t 's" Repwi
KLAMATH BASIN CARLOT SHIPMENTS
I RAIL TRUCK TTL TO DATE TTL A YEAR AGO
"OREGON 7 10 I M : IMi
California I V " I " mm j" ns""
WALL STREET
NEW YORK iL'PIi Stocks
hit a record high on a modest
gain today.
Prices advanced smartly in
the early hours of the session
but the advance slowed around
the noon hour and the averages
eased back a little.
The Dow Jones 3 p.m. indus
trial average rose 2.69 to 768.88.
just topping the previous record
high of 767.21.
Steels were fractionally high
er. Motors were mixed. Allied
Chemical and Pfizer turned in
good gains in the chemicals
where Du Pont retreated.
Livestock
PORTLAND (UPI) USDAi
Weekly livestock:
Cattle 770. Steers and heifers
strong to 50c higher; mixed
high good-choice steers 22.25
22.50: mostly good 'heifers 20:
utility - commercial cows 12-15:
canner 10-12.50: utility - com
mercial bulls J8-20.
Calves J00. Good - choice
slaughter 29-30, few good 300
480 lb 19-21; few good - choice
feeder steers 22.50-24.
Hogs 1650. il 4 2 barrows and
gilts 116-16.25; sows 1, 2 and 3
grade 10-12.50.
Sheep 375. Choice-some prime
lambs 97-103 lb wooled and fall
shorn pelts 18-18.25; few head
choice shorn 17-17.50; ewes cull
utility wooled 5 25.
Groins
CHICAGO (UPII -Grain
range:
High Low Close
Wheal
'Mar 2.22 2.20 2.21V2.22
May 2.17 2.16 2.17-
Jul il.77 J.76 1.77-
Sep 1.79 il.7814 1.79
Dec 183 1.83 1.83-
Oats
Mar .70 .80 .70
May .71 .70 .71
Jul .67 .67 .67
Rye
Mar il.53 .1.49 1.52-1.53
May 1.55 1.52 (1.55-1.55'.
Jul il.49 ;1.46 .1.49-
Stocks
MUTUAL FUNDS
Prices (until 10 a.m. PDT today
Bid Asked 1
Affiliated (Fund 8. in 8.86
Atomic iFund 4.84 S.28
Bullock 13.70 15.02
Chemical Fund 12.28 33.95
Colonial Fund 11.51 12.18
Comw. Jnv. 9.90 30.02
Diver Growth 9.23 10.12
Dreyfus 19.02 20.67
E Si H Slock 14.40 ,15.56
Fidelity Capital 10.38 .11.28
Fidelity Trend 17.23 18.73
Fundamental 10.11 11.08
F.l.F. 4.40 4.88
Founders Fund 6.75 7.34
Group Bee Com 13.43 34.70
Gr Sec lAvia El 6.83 7.49
Hamilton H.O.A. 5.11 5.58
Incorp Inv. ?.43 8.12
Investors' Group
lntercont'l XI) 5.8 6.36
Mutual M.MI .12.63
Stock ' 19.19 20.75
Selective 10.41 11.14
Keystone S-1 23.01 25.11
Keystone K-3 15.51 .16.92
Keystone S-4 4.39 4.80
M.J.T. 15.33 16.75
M.I.T. Growth 8.43 9.21
Nat'l lnv. 16.01 17.31
Nat'l Sec Div 4.30 4.70
Nat'l Sec Growth 8.50 9.29
Nat'l Sec Slock 8,17 8.93
Putnam Fund 15.36 16.79
Putnam Growth 8.91 9.74
Sup ilnv. Kcr 7.6H 8.37
Value Lines 5.36 5.86
Wellington 14.52 13.83
Windsor 14.34 15.59
Whitehall 13.77 14.89
He Celebrated
With A Bang
OMAHA, Neb. IUPI -Ezell
Henderson was nursing
a sore heel today and all be
cause he wanted to really
whoop it up on New Year's
Eve.
Henderson, 25, dashed from
his home at Hie stroke of mid
night waving a .22 caliber re
volver. Tlie gun fell from his
hands, hit live porch steps and
discharged a bullet which
struck his heel.
Parents Reveal 2 Boys
Who Vandalized House
The parents of two young boys
brought their sons into police
headquarters Thursday and
identified them as the two who
broke into a house on West Iowa
Street Wednesday.
The house, occupied by
Alturas Man
Escapes
Auto Crash
TULELAKE Kenneth Basil
Meadows, 24, Alturas, escaped
death about 3:30 a.m. Friday,
Jan. 3, in a spectacular one-car
accident on California State
Highway 139, 25 miles south of
Tulelake.
Highway Patrolman V. F. Mc
Mahon, who was called to the
scene at 5: 15 a.m. reported that
Deputy Sheriff Marion Thomp
son of Modoc County found Mea
dows wandering barefoot on the
highway more than an hour af
ter the accident with a long
gash in his head. He took the
injured man to a Tulelake doctor
who took 12 stitches in the
wound and after further treat
ment released him. The man
had walked some distance to the
California quarantine station for
help, found it closed and appar
ently, dazed from his injuries,
wandered away.
Meadows, driving a two-door
1957 Chevrolet sedan, told offi
cers he was southbound when
he dodged some deer crossing
the highway. The vehicle trav
eled 550 feet, 147 feet end over
end down the highway, before
coming to a stop. The driver
was not thrown out.
He is a brakeman for the
Southern Pacific Railroad in Al
turas. He is a former resident
of Klamath Falls where his
mother lives.
Death Claims
Charles Keller
Charles L. Keller, 91, a resi
dent of Klamath Falls many
years ago, died in a San Ber
nardino, Calif., hospital on Dec.
28. He had been in ailing health
since the death of his son, Lt.
Col. Raymond S. Keller, last
spring.
A daughter, Sgt. Audrey Po
mel, survives.
Funeral services were con
ducted Dec. 30 by the Mark B.
Shaw Mortuary in San Bernar
dino. Burial was in the M6un
tain View Cemetery.
Obituaries
CHUBB
Edson F. Chubb, 53. died Jan. 3, 1964.
He Is survived by the widow, Gladys,
of Klamath Falls; six brothers, William,
Bonner's Ferry. Idaho, George, Boise,
Idaho. Arthur, Sand Point, Idaho, My
ron, Dorrls, Calif., Clarence, Fall River
Mills, Wis., Richard, Cumberland, Wls.i
lour sinters, Mrs. Margaret Harkness
and Mrs, Catherine Young, both ot
Spooner, Wis., Lottie Stockman and
Clara Evans, both ol Sand Point, Ida
ho; and numerous nieces and nephews.
Funeral services will be held Saturday,
Jan. 4, at 7 p.m. in O'Hair's Memorial
Chapel with interment at Eternal Hills
Memorial Gardens.
TUCKER
Charles William Tucker, 60, died here
Jan. 3, 1964. Survivors: sister, Mrs.
Frances E. Klmmel, Manteca, Calif.
Funeral services, Ward's Klamath Fu
neral Home, Monday, Jan. 6. at 10 a.m.
Concluding services, Klamath Memorial
Park.
JOHNSON
Patricia Jean Johnson, 37, died here
Jan. 3, 1964. Survivors: husband. Leo,
this city; sisters, Magdalene Schonchln,
Wocus, Vera Walker, Chlloquln, Wllma
Schonchln. Red Bluff. Calif. aunt, Jane
Lawvor, Bonania; many nieces and ne
phawi. Funeral services, Ward's Klam
alh Funeral Home, Monday, Jan. 6, at
I p.m. Vault tnttrmertt Chief Schonchln
Cemetery.
Funerals
McOILVRAY
Funtrl urviccs for Hector Jamts
McGllvrav will lake plac, Irom the
cheoel ot Werd'i Klamath Funeral
Home on Saturday. Jan. i. 1944. at 10
a m. Concluding lervket Klamath Me
morial Park,
Khrushchev Asks Banning Of Use Of Force
MOSCOW (Ul'li-Premicr Ni-
klta S. Khrushchev has asked
world leaders to reach agree
ment on banning the use of
force in settling territorial dis
putes, including those involv
ing Germanv, il was learned to
day. Khrushchev, in a note to
Charles Gunter, was ransacked
and vandalized. Milk was poured
over the floor, stove burners
were turned on and clothes were
strewn throughout the house.
Police said the parents had
become srspicious of their sons
Thursday and, unknown to each
other, questioned the boys and
elicited confessions of the van
dalism. The boys, aged 11 and 12,
were returned to their parents
after being cited into Juvenile
Court.
Police said the pair apparent
ly is not involved in a series of
other burglaries believed com
mitted by juveniles.
Five bottles of beer stolen
from the Gunter home were
smashed by the youths, police
said.
Heart Attack
Claims Life
Of Motorist
A 53-year-old Klamath Falls
man suffered a fatal heart at
tack while driving on East Main
Street Thursday and his car ran
into a parked pickup truck.
Police said Edson Frederick
Chubb. 2424 Reclamation Ave
nue, died at Hillside Hospital
less than a half-hour after suf
fering the attack.
Officers said he was south
bound on East Main when the
attack occurred. Chubb's 1950
sedan struck a parked pickup
owned by William Sims, then
continued down East Main for
another two blocks before stop
ping. Police said the car stopped
when Chubb lapsed into uncon
sciousness. He was "rushed to
Hillside by a police officer, but
di-d at 12:10 p.m.
Mr. Chubb was a native of
Cumberland, Wis., born Aug. 9,
1910. He came to Klamath Falls
in 1936 and engaged as a paint
er. He was employed by Keith
Coddington of the KC P a i n t
Company. He was a member of
Ponderosa Lodge, No. 220 AF
Si AM and of Scottish Rite.
Masonic funeral services for
Chubb will be held Saturday, 2
p.m., at O'Hair's Mortuary. He
was a foreman for KC Paint
ing Company. He is survived by
the widow, Gladys, six brothers
and four sisters.
Cafe Burns
In Macdoel
MAODOEL .Fire of undeter
mined origin totally destroyed
the Ideal Cafe and its contents
at an early hour Thursday, Jan.
2. The property owned by Mrs.
Mary Smith is reported to be
covered by little insurance. Loss
is estimated at $5,000.
Mrs. Smith was at home at
the time.
The one-story frame building
on U.S. Highway 97 was a
favorite stop for truck drivers.
Macdoel, 20 miles south of the
Oregon-California line, has no
fire department. Neighbors
made unsuccessful attempts to
subdue the blaze with garden
hoses.
Keys Returned To Firm
Dugan and Most Chevrolet's
used car lot is buck in busi
ness today.
Keys to all of the firm's used
cars were stolen Dec. 28 in a
'burglary, but were returned
Thursday by a man who claimed
a $25 reward.
The man told Dugan and Jlesl
he knows who the burglars arc.
world leaders that was broad
cast over Moscow Radio, said
such a pact would make it
easier to solve basic cold war
problems.
Moscow Radio quoted the note
as saying "one should renounce
the use of force in settling the
question of tlie reunification ot
such states as Korea. Viet
Nam. Germany."
The text of the 4.000-unrri
note was delivered to world
capitals during the past 4tl
hours.
Knur-Point Plan
It urged a lour-point plan
which comprised a pact repu
diating the use of force in set
tling disputes: a8umkx1ge
ment that territories of stales
should not even tomHirarily In
attacked, invaded or occupied
directly or indirectly; ohhga
gatory peaceful solution of bor
der disputes in arvordanrr Willi
tlie United Nations Charter;
and a declaration thai dillet
ciiccs in social systems or lack
of diplomatic contact should not
serve as a reason for one na
tion to violate the boundaries of
another.
Khrushchev himself is in
Warsaw on a Mirprisr visit to
v V ; " t . I
iW 'V 'J
lklv. - j-,mJ iu i .
FRIENDLY RIVALS John P. Tribe, left, and Neal Mon
tague, have been pacing each other for the past several
weeks in the Red Cross "Swim and Stay Fit" program
to win the required 50-mile competition in the Klamath
Basin. On Tuesday, Dec. 31, Montague completed the
swim with Tribe one mile behind.
Red Cross Swim Program
Stresses Fitness Benefits
The 50-mile "Swim and Stay
Fit" program launched by the
American Red Cross is a
planned activity to encourage in
dividuals to swim regularly and
frequently.
This swim is not a marathon,
not a race, not competitive ex
cept in a friendly way. It is not
an endurance test, say Red
Cross swim officials, nor is
there a time limit. Its goal is
State Police
Cite Driver
A 32-year-old serviceman was
to be arraigned on a charge of
driving under the influence of
alcohol in district court today,
after his arrest following a rear
end collision at the intersection
of South Sixth and Gary streets
about midnight last night, Ore
gon State Police have reported.
Lodged in the county jail after
the accident was S.Sgt. Allen
Lee Eidson, 7588 McGuire Ave
nue, Falcon Heights.
The accident occurred as Olaf
Ray Wood, 25, of 2113 Gary
Street, was turning onto Gary
from South Sixth Street after
signalling for a left turn. Eid
son had been driving behind
Wood's car and was unable to
stop in time to avert a collision
when it decelerated to turn off
South Sixth Street.
There were no injuries. Dam
age was minor to both vehicles,
police said.
GERMAN CATTLE
About 40 per cent of all cattle
in West Germany were affected
by tuberculosis in 1052. An erad
ication program started then
has rendered these cattle 09.9
Iier cent free of the disease.
but refused to identify them
and thereby collect another $100
reward.
A 10K! automobile was stolen
at the time of the burglary, but
was later recovered after being
abandoned by the thieves.
Since the burglary, Dugan and
Must has had a locksmith work
ing to open the nearly 100
locked cars.
Polish Communist party lead
ers. i In Washington earlier today,
some American experts were
reported to feel the note was an
attempt to drive a wedge be
tween the United States and its
(Allies over the Berlin issue.
They said it appeared to be
seeking a pledge from Washing
ton to renounce the threat of
force to maintain the access
routes to isolated Western Ber
lin.! Incompatible With Peace
Khrushchev said territorial
claims by certain states which
Here tlie aggressors in World
War II an obvious reference to
Germany must be "resolutely
rejected as incompatible with
Ihc inlerests of peace" liccause
nolhing tint a new war mav re
sult. Khrushchev did nut sjHH-ily
hnv the oroposed agreement
was In lie arrived at. Rut lie I
added-
"H will not Ik- especially dil- '
licult to agree if, of course, tlie ;
interested states will manifest j
their desire."
Tlie anpcil. hroaili ast h .'
Moscow Radio, said. Hie So-
Met Union on its part will do j
to improve the physical fitness
of the individual.
The values of swimming are
numerous. Swimming can be
beneficial to the mind as well
as the body, they point out. The
program is meant for those not
only of superior athletic ability
but also for those with lesser
ability. Thus, it need not be re
served for the select few, but
is beneficial for the majority of
the population.
Those participating say the 50
mile goal may seem to be an
ambitious one, but the miles
tick off as a quarter mile or 440
yards at a swim are accom
plished. The 440 yards need not
be covered continuously. The
swimmer may stop and rest if
needed. Any stroke or combina
tion of swim strokes may be
used.
i' Forty five enthusiasts; have a
otal of 338 miles in the Klam
ath Basin since the local Red
Cross chapter launched the pro
gram last July. Winter swim
mers use the high school pool.
Trio Hurt
In Mishap
Three persons suffered cuts
and bruises Thursday afternoon
when a small foreign sports car
carrying four persons and an
American-made compact collid
ed at Mitchell and Applegate
streets. ".
The injured were identified as
Gary Collum, 25, 2315 Applegate,
driver bt' the sports car: Mrs.
Pat Kimball, 33 , 2315. Applegate,
a passenger in the sports car;
and the driver of the compact,
23-year-old Paul George Juve
land, 2302 White Street.
Two other persons, in the
sports ear. Lynne Kimball, 8,
and her brother, Jeff, 3, were
unhurt.
Juvcland was cited for fa Hiiro
to yield the right-of-way after
the 1:20 p.m. collision which
caused major damages to both
autos.
Police said Collum was driv
ing west on Applegate and Juvc
land north on Mitchell when the
cars collided in the intersec
tion. The sports car skidded 21
feet into a curb and the com
pact 30 feet unlit a lawn.
all that is necessary to facili
tate resolution of these ques
tions." Khrushchev's letter argued
that if an agreement is con
cluded, "it can le confidently
said I hat the new climate cre
ated by a pact between states
renouncing the use of forces in
the settlement of territorial dis
putes, would make it much eas
ier to find a solution of other
basic problems, first of all Hie
problem of disarmament."
Khrushchev said that histor
ically Hie application of lorecs
to territorial disputes "has been
and is one o( the principal stim
uli to the arms race."
"Disputes between states on
territorial questions "torm a
nourishing base for militarism
as well as for inflaming hostili
ties by those ho eagerly spec
ulate with an unbridled arms
race as a source ot profit." he
said.
APPLIANCE
SERVICE
CALL
J. W. KERNS
734 So, lh TU 4-417
Poce Nob
Two Boys
In House
Two 12-ear-old boys nabbed
by police in a house Thursday
afternoon are being questioned
about a recent series of burgla
ries in which juveniles are sus
pected. Police received a call at 1:25
p.m. Thursday that two boys
were seen entering the house at
723 Washington Street.
An officer caught the boys in
the house, which had been en
tered through a window from
which the screen had been cut.
Police said the boys originally
had tried to pry open a board-ed-up
door, but had been unsuc
cessful. They are being questioned
about a series of house burgla
ries, many of which occurred
when locked doors were pried
open.
One recent house burglary
was solved Thursday with tsie
arrest of two other young boys,
who apparently aren't involved
in the others.
The two 12-year-olds have
been cited into Juvenile Court.
ii if
.ommunuu
daiendc
FRIDAY
SHASTA VIEW GRANGE, 8
p.m., officers' practice, grange
hall, Shasta Way and Madison.
DAV AND AUXILIARY, 8
p.m., meeting, American Legion
Hall.
LOOM, 6:30 p.m., fish fry,
Moose Home.
THETA BHO GIRLS CLUB
8. 7:30 p.m., open installation,
IOOF Hall.
YMCA FAMILY NIGHT, 6:30
p.m.. potluck, family recreation,
progressive games, call YMCA
for table reservations.
SATURDAY
LOOM, 6:45 p.m., steak feed,
dance following, Moose Home.
t
BETHEL 61, Job's Daughters,
7:30 p.m., open installation,
Scottish Rite Temple.
MT. LAKI COMMUNITY
CLUB, 6 p.m.. potluck supper,
Henley Farm Bureau Hall.
SHASTA VIEW GRANGE,
8:30 p.m., dance, refreshments,
grange hall. Grangers and
friends.
NAACP, 7 p.m., meeting,
county library lecture room.
MONDAY
BETHEL 61, Jobs Daughters,
7 p.m., meeting, Scottish Rite
Temple. .
DAR, Eulalona Chapter, 7:30
p.m., dessert, 8 p.m., meeting,
conference delegate selection,
election, First Methodist Church.
NEIGHBORS OF WOOD
CRAFT, 8 p.m., potluck, secret
pal drawing, KC Hall.
Growers Pick
New Officers
TULELAKE-William Haynes
has been named president of the
Tulelake Growers Association,
to serve with French E. John
son, vice president, and Harb
Schwarz, secretary - treasurer.
The new officers were named
at an organizational meeting fol
low ing Hie annual membership
meeting.
New committees will be
named at the next board of di
rectors meeting on Jan. 14.
Haynes succeeds John Coulson
who served two one-year terms
as president. Sam Wynn. associ
ation manager, reported Friday
tluit the proposal to levy a one
half cent per hundredweight as
sessment on potato shipments
to replace the per acre assess
ment of $1 per acre, has been
well received by shippers who
have agreed to cooperate with
the plan. Shippers will be asked
to make the necessary deduc
tions at shipping points.
BURNS UNDER GUARD
HONOLULU UPI i - Gov.
John A. Burns of Hawaii was
under close guard today after a
soldier from Schofield Army
barracks reported that he over
heard a threat on the gover
nor's life.
Honolulu police and detectives
were immediately assigned to
guard the governor, but Burns
d:d not rhanqc his schedule.
Caldvel! Cifes Preblem
Assessing Timbgr Lend
How may the county assessor
determine the value of imma
ture reproductive trees growing
on timber lands?
That was the dilemma pre
sented by Assessor Clyde "Hap"
Caldwell to representatives of
the timber and cattle industries
in the county courthouse
early today, as he and assessors
in 18 Eastern Oregon counties
took over the responsibility of
assessing timber lands in that
part of tlie state.
Last year, the state legisla
ture transferred the duty of as
sessing timber lands in East
ern Oregon from the state tax
commission to the assessors of
those respective counties, effec
tive Jan. il.
Ray Brackman, supervisor of
appraisals at tlie assessor's of
fice, told tlie group today that
sales of timber land during
the past five or six years indi
cated that the tax commission
has been assessing such prop
erty at too low a figure.
But a study of those sales
transactions has defied attempts
of the assessor's staff to deter
mine a realistic appraisal of the
market value of those lands,
Brackman told his audience.
1 He cited 16 timber land sales
during recent years in which
the price per acre varied from
$8.71 per acre to $57.35 per acre.
Reproductive timber had been
removed from the lands in the
two extreme cases.
In some other sales in which
reproductive timber was includ
ed, the price per acre went
from $24 to $34, but there was
no ready answer to explain the
wide variation in tlie unit acre
price, Brackman said.
"We need help in setting up
some method of acquiring real-
2nd Vote
Possible
(Continued from Page 1)
for the opinion that the overlap
area holds a veto power over
the plan.
City school officials are furth
er concerned over the problem
of school zones , within the new
city district, but feel this ques
tion might be solved after the
plan goes into effect.
Upset Victory In 1952
Started Goldwater Rise
(Continued from Page 1)
publican announced his decision
most conservatives looked on
him as their main presidential
hope a man against "me-too-ism"
with the Democratic par
ty and a rugged individualist
with a strong flavor and authen
tic background of the Old West.
Know-land Backs Goldwater
Former Sen. William F.
Knowiand, onetime Senate ma
jority leader from California,
was among the first to tab
Goldwater as a presidential
candidate and has been work
ing all year in his behalf.
A volunteer group of Goldwa
ter enthusiasts established a
headquarters in Washington last
April and drew financial sup
port which ran over the $1Q0,
000 mark.
Goldwater, w ho just turned 53
on New Year's Day, is a politi
cal newcomer relatively speak
ing and rose to national promi
nence after he upset veteran
Democrat Ernest McFarland in
an election for the U.S. Senate
in 1952 by a mere 7.000 votes.
This was the first time Arizona
had a Republican senator since
11120.
- Goldwater was re-elected to
the Senate in 1958 and mean
while became known throughout
the nation as a spokesman for
an apparent resurgence of con
r,w,"l.f.-'M''.'M"l..'.w'rwJiJ,'ii l JJ nie8
FASH
CLEARANCE
NOW IN PROGRESS
Fantostic Savings on Coats,
Suits, Dresses, Sportswear,
Children's Wear, Lingerie
and Foundations.
istic appraisals of these lands,"
he said.
The assessor's office also
needs help in another area, too,
Brackman said.
In recent years, timber lands,
in certain cases, have become
valuable areas for recreation.
Does this new usage increase
the land's market value, and, if
so, how great, should be that
new value.
In other cases, the value of
timber lands has also increased
w hen their use has been extend
ed as grazing lands or for sub
division as home sites.
Brackman stated that the as
sessed value of timber lands are
generally determined by geo
graphical area without regard
to the types of timber -growing
on the property, a method that
leaves something to be desired,
he said.
He concluded that the asses
sor's office and the state tax
commission were generally' in
agreement on the assessed val
ue of large tracts of timber
lands.
"lt is on parcels less than 160
acres where we are in trouble,"
he said.
Passenger
Injured
In Accident
A 20-year-old woman suffered
whiplash injuries Thursday af
ternoon in a three-car rear-end
collision on South Sixth Street at
East Main Street.
Police said Lirda Fickcn, 4310
Gary Street, complained ot neck
injuries, but didn't require treat
ment. She was a passenger in a 19(12
compact car driven by Lyle
Dwayne Ficken, 27, which was
struck in the rear by another
auto. The compact was shoved
into a third car stopped in front
of it, officers said.
Corbyn Roche Pomeroy, 18,
1224 MonClaire, whose 1955 se
dan struck the Ficken auto, was
cited for following too closely.
The third auto stopped in front
of the Ficken car waiting to
make a turn was driven by
Barbara Eileen Tiernan, 34, 788
Westbrook Drive.
servatism. His only previous po
litical office was as a member
of the Phoenix City Council.
Deplores Cuba Handling
In consistently conservative
expressions, he has deplored the
U.S. handling of the Castro
Cuba trouble; disapproved gov
ernment "spendthrift" tactics;
looked with some doubt on the
United Nations; and has advo
cated breaking of diplomatic re
lations -with Russia and other
Communist countries.
But Goldwater has not, in his
public utterances, espoused ex
tremist views of the far right.
Goldwater, a native of Ari
zona, has a blunt outspoken ap
proach to problems. He seems to
like to make a decision and
carry it out quickly.
He looks somewhat like the
popular image of a frontiers
man. He's tall, lean and tanned
an active lover of the outdoors
and pilots his own plane. He's a
major general in the Air Force
Reserve. Even his speech has
the ring of the Old West and he
has a folksy presentation.