Herald and news. (Klamath Falls, Or.) 1942-current, August 03, 1942, Page 8, Image 8

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    i
lf J
f A
SERIAL STORY
LUCKY PENNY
BY GLORIA KAYE
COPYBIOHT. !.
NRA tlRVICE. INC.
TUB STonVt Taa war kaa
' vrorkrd a raaasa fa laatop
Kirk, vrrallar, potlra' a4 1Q.
aa aaa nrd war-lora Knnif
aad Teloraad 1a taa famtlr
. aatate at Klrktavra. la mill
. ten-n inker Bar vrandfa1kr
bnllt hla fortune. An aha Basra
B( kn manorial aadltortam ha
aaaafaed hr krr ajraJidfntkrr
ako oraraaara a an ataklae;
ajaaaraalna rantarka akoat krr
' family and karsalf. Ska raroa;.
' alcea ka aa-aakar aa Jim Vlrk-
ara, a former Parla aavraaaaa.r-
'.. PENNT LANDS A JOB
CHAPTER II
JENNY sang "good morning" to
a bright and cloudless day.
From her window she could see
white plumes of smoke floating
lailly up from the valley-hugging
mills. -.
. She had realized last night that
Kirk town would be no paradise,
bhe had known that a community
nestled so close to the smoke ot
the steel mills and the soot of the
railroad yards must absorb some
blackness. .' "
But Penny was not prepared
for the nightmare of ramshackle,
broken-down buildings that made
up Kirktown. They looked for all
the world as though they were
held together with clotheslines and
built on foundations ot toothpicks.
' The river was not a stream at
all, but a rusty, smelly, steaming
sewer. It cut the town in half.
Oh cse side tha Kirk mills rose
In black majesty. They were huge,
powerful, impressive . . . and dirty.
' Central avenue lined the other
ide, its dirty-faced buildings
fronting the river. Two foot
bridges crossed street and river,
providing access to .the fenced-in
mills.- To the right, as far as her
eye could see, stretched buildings
and furnaces and railroad yards
the Kirk industrial empire. To her
left, devoid of all attractiveness,
lay tlie shattered, bruised, smoky
residences and commercial struc
tures that marked the remnants
of her dream of Kirktown.-
Though the day had Just begun,
Penny was already tired. She
parked her car wearily, stifling
another urge to leave Kirktown
behind her forever. Surely some
where in this broken-down hodge
podge, of derelicts there must be
some saving note of charm.
In silent depression she walked
down Central avenue. She had
never seen so- poor a business
street. Merchants showed no pride
in their establishments.' Most of
the : windows had no displays.
' . She wandered up one street and
down. the other. .Only the avenue
at the top of the hill, where the
John Kirk Memorial Auditorium
had been erected, defied the uni
versal ugliness. ' . ' . .
"'r Here, on a plateau overlooking
itie teeming mills, a-few daring
souls had built middle-class homes
'that-blossomed' like oases in the
sooty, desert. , Here were Kirk
town's .only .patches ..of . garden.
" - "
tlACK-on; Central avenue again
. she paused to rest in front of
i a . restaurant whose interior was
trie' most' inviting she had seen
.since starting her tour of the town.
The girl behind the counter was
neatly uniformed. - Steel workers,
in-long-sleeved black, shirts de
spite the heat of the dajv sat at
the long counter. .
; ..Penny; realized she had been
walking for hours.- . She was
-thirsty.. She '.walked in and ;sat
down. - The girl behind the coun
ter smiled a cheerful greeting as
she placed, a . glass , of .water in
' front of Penny. " . ' '
-"A -glass of -milk,' please, said
Penny, . -
i "Sure, honey," replied the wait
ress. ."And . don't worry. YouU
get the Job. .I'll, put in .a .word for
' you with the boss. Chin up, kid.
. You're in.". . .
Penny watched In startled won
' der .as the. "Girl Wanted"' sign was
lifted out of the restaurant win
dow.1 Then she looked at herself
in the mirror. Her dress no longer
wore the crisp look that had en
deared it to her. It was wrinkled
now. Her. face , showed , unmis
takable signs ot the smudges she
had accumulated during her long
walk.
This, Penny thought .as she
studied The troubled, weary, ex
pression on her face,, must be the
way jobless girls look after a hard
nay of fruitless searcn lor employment--
" '
Should she take the job?
. Here, Penny realized, was a
golden -opportunity to pierce be
low the surface of Kirktown, to
find out - for, herself what had
caused such deterioration. She ad
justed her hair and brushed a
fleck of soot from her nose. She
wanted to make a good impres
sion -on "the boss."
In a moment he bustled out of
his kitchen, a rotund, excited lit
tle man. , He appraised her swiftly,
nodded, "All right," he said, "you
start tomorrow." v
So . Penny Kitk, who used to
sleep until noon, started her first
day's work at Pietro's Restaurant
at 6 o'clock the next morning.
"Good morning, honey,", her
friend of yesterday greeted. "My
name's Midge. Carter, .What's
yours?"
"Penny Kellogg," the heiress to
the .Kirk millions responded,
glancing swiftly at the row of
breakfast ' foods on the back
counter. "Thanks for the boost,
Midge.?
"Think nothing of it, kid. You
didn't need any help. Old Pietro
can spot a good waitress the min
ute he sees one." Midge studied
Penny's trim figure. "I'll bet
you've- worked in a-lot better
beanerles than Oils one," she com
plimented. Penny wondered what Midge
would say If she knew that her
hands had never before lifted a
dish. She wondered; too, what her
friends would say . if they could
"see her In. the whito-trlmmcd
green uniform,, a triangular cap
perched saucily on her sort curls.
She smiled as she rauglil a glimpse
of herself in the mirror.
"Come on. Penny. There's work
to be done," called Midge. "The
next turn starts soon."
a a
A TURN, Penny learned, whs the
shift worked by the men in
the mill. From the restaurant
window, she could see steel work
ers crossing over the foot bridge
on their way to work.
Penny swung easily into the
routine of the restaurant. From
Midge she learned to take her
work in the spirit of a lark, as
though she were picnicking in
stead of laboring. At the expense
of a few nervous dishes, she soon
learned to carry the amazing
number of- things waitresses can
manage with skillful hands and
wrists. -
Men sauntered into Pietro's in
them were young. She liked their j
cheery greetings and their natural
courtesy toward her. Later on,
storekeepers drifted in to discuss
business conditions and the day's I
headlines over their cups of coffee.
When the noon rush had ended,
Penny felt she had earned the rest
and the luncheon Pietro offered. 1
From the kitchen came tantalizing
odors and Pietro's excited voice. :
"Sit down. Miss Penny," Pietro :
said. "I have something special
for you." He pushed through the
swinging door, a steaming dish of
spaghetti held aloft for Penny's
inspection. . !
"You have to eat every bit of
it," Pietro insisted. "I made the
meat sauce especially for you."
He hovered over the table, ar
ranging the basket of white bread
and the dish of cheese. "Eat. It's
good for you."
Pennv hadn't realized she was
so hungry. She naan t oenevea
anything could b so appetizing.
Intent on her dinner, she didn't
notice the newcomers who swag
gered in. Had she been watching
Midge, usually so friendly, she
would have been surprised at the
cold stare that wbs her only greet
ing "or them.
There were five men In the
group. Definitely not steel work
ers. Penny decided. They dldnt
bother to remove spotless white
felt hats as they seated themselves.
They wore expensive silk sport
shirts, vividly colored: trousers
that were too carefully creased,
shoes shlned to mirror perfection.
Suspenders of tooled leather com
pleted their garish splendor.'
Midge took their "black coffee"
orders In silence. She served them
and walked to the other side of
the counter, where she busied her
self arranging napkins and filling
sucnr bowls.
Then, in a flash, like a cloud
burst descending suddenly from
a clear sky, black fury hit Pietro's
restaurant. That was the only way
Penny could describe the scene
that caught her startled eyes when
she turned at the sound of crash
ing dishes.
(To Be Continued)
FOR YOUR VACATION!
The New
ZEXITH
Portable
The 3-way universal portable
with removable "wave-magnet"
plays on trains. In cars,
in planes!
ALSO ....
zi;mtii
Itnilio-lMiono .
Combinations
Availabl at
UIILIG'S
1026 Main
THIS CURIOUS WORLD
By William
Ferguson
PLASTIC FEsiCtl V.TJR!
1 NOW BEING USED IN t'i.V'Sl llVua'l.lAUisiiflB 1
I PLACE OF AETALS IN MANY i ft' ' VI I, I 1
S WAR SUPPLIES, HAS ' sll UMrl1 1 P.,l
I A GREATER TENSILE "iJr'fln V 'I 11 II
f STRENGTH, WEIGHT FOR H Hu VV'Vll II
I WEIGHT, THAN ' J''-l:llaAPj, II I
f HELP SAVE ETAL BY 'j .IfL Z,vu3
GUARDING OUR FORESTS. jaNjf
VX. 5 t. m beg. u. s. pat. on.
SOAP
WAS USED AS
IN SO.tS. MEXICAN TOWNS
IN THE EARLY ISTH CENTURY
MEN COULD WASH WITH THE
SOAP AND STILL PASS rr
IF THE IMPRINT REMAINED.
HAT IS THE MEANING
OF THE WORD
. ANSWER: It means book, and many people speak of It simply
as "the-book."
RADIO STAR
HORIZONTAL
1 Pictured radio
12 Play the part
of host
13 Pardon.
15 Heart (Egypt)
17 Daughter, of
Inachus
(myth.).
18 Dutch city.
20 Pint (abbr.).
21 Ambary.
22 Disembark.
24 Smudge
26 Girl's name. ,
28 Reflux.
29 Moreover.
3l Boundary
(comb. form).
32 From.
33 Either. -
34 Five and five.
36 Toward
37 Hasten.
38 Russian river.
39 Artificial
language.
41 Music note.
42 Rodent
43 Accomplish.
45 Self.
47 Symbol for
nickel.
48 Constellation.
Answer to Previous Puzzle
JR Lapfe JMIE NFrVE AR ,
Pf ' IR EAID T vB I L L HE
ADS ! IL IP G - TAlsl; : EKjP
DO" iAiT e "Ta . Iah.a -CE
b -pL yTT sieM-i t r y "n
ZlBlE E TIR URAL i; f1 E TL
GE T :-; AIpH I IfflAIL ' S EIA
ArA iAS HEmxMB
n qs lei ROBERT yi i lc wr
Uis'EDl lA'STEiRl
49 Liberate.
51 Exude.
52 Ells English
(abbr.).
53 Symbol for
neodymlum.
55 Obese.
57 Comparative
suffix.
58 Measure.
59 Garment
61 Weird.
64 She is one of
the best
known radio
VERTICAL
1 Foot (abbr.).
2 Dry.
3 One that rep
resents what
is newest
4 Symbol for
sodium.
5 Details.
6 Sustenance.
7 Of the thing.
8 Rogue.
9 Quote.
10 And (Fr.).
11 Made into
bales.
14 She is noted
for her stage
and per
formances. 16 Infant. '
19 The twH
I Z . 3 Or 5 16 7 8 9 10
171 it ' py:" r
g 5 3!jp tj nsrcrf? Wl5 sli '
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as" ts rT igir I y 55 46"
si r sj- tt Uii I Is6 wd 'sf'
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iJlilill 1 -w. , ..ijll1 I iwwSW
. ' wiuw.i By J. K. Willioml
; I A AlK AWK-V LAST Ti-WT 1 f syS&Zffl
Red Ryder
FrOKTNFl ANNK.-'T WHATis THCST f PERHAPS COLONEL.
IF YOU'RE NOT I MAJOR L0RETTA? I I IT IS A SMALL R EHVAUffTie 1
aX, " I TOO BUSY CAPTAIN OHO? I 1 MATTER "BUT TO Rj . PR1SS? I
Li CAPTAIN CHU f1 OH, SURE- 12 MG IT seCMCO 6A WHAT I
3 .lf ! WOULD LIKE f (VI NgVgS -TOO I 1 IMPOHTTANT a HAS P. ABOUT I
&VWat-- I "TO SEE YOU" J BUsYrjPF-E JS TO DO WITH MRS. f. HER, 1
JVfJ . y HJM-SEND f i SLEET THT IS. CAPTAIN. I
J' Little Orphon Annie aaa.
t'li!- ' fTAKe THIS CONVERSATION! V- fwMO Wi rJ""3
Ia",, DOWN IM SHORTHAND, MISS VES.MB.' ' THE LET TFR. Sf IT
OJMWNQSJ EVER.Y WORQ I KENT ADDRESSED J WAS 1
Ljfe. , OF IT.' TO, AND JU5T ( ALL A
EWSiis 'M WHAT DID MOSH91E
Irt w " VOU WRITE ? MISTAKF,
LiN1' aN (TX-l t MR. KENT
It A Wft
ei ir i needles una riis rnsnu; ' ' '
aAb I . C , s r ..- ..T-.-.rr.
SIKAPLY TOO APOR- A PAPA ' WHILE 1 PEC0VER FROM
ABLE FOR WORM, THEIR ' J vJHE 6 HOCK
EASy f y NAMES ARE T)rl 1 WAS X u -
THOMA'S AMD J v I KIWPA v j
. SURPRISED jfi
PMKtcjvv Jilt feBte ;Ajdr-
.. uivmmtm mmrn .m.-
Boots ond Her Buddiesili UlLMteiAi tiVaai - I
f C iaiith kin Mm.
JUST OkJE AIRCRAFT .
III BOWlBITHttT FIRer" SHUCKS,
1 WAS MICE I IT WAS , J I
GoiNO, cock eoup.' y (
: U-4 : rz
, ABOUT HOOPLt MWR .M X ZSIrl
HW5 COME INTO MQNtl V""'' V 0 TlikT
H-KAFP-t SOLDDRErXp- k MOK BAUb THAT
I TAKE eRMT JON WrW ' ) '"
1M(3 SOUPi IOO LOAK.'
ABOVE ALL, MftRI Wf
.NOW
I AT
WOULD VOii
.-' S nnwkl is
OTtMCDORs.'
A IWUV) i r' " .... .Tt A
fi if'n pirn AS J UMDtR . UIN i-tNU
CLEAN AS AWOLIDW FOWL' J j MlLn'fvKY, FW,rtl5t:
s -av-ttt-tI"I
-Si
is- tmtif riH J wows
'ur Boording Hou.o fLf X ) V M SUT MARTHN
ifh Major Hooolo it:j2iV-l;' - ( -
U
With
THAT'S THC
E.PUTY .'
::.ZJ
co. i. i H.-.ti imc i m u ' " : :
JUST THIS. COLOHFL--SH6
HAS DONE MUCH
TO HELP US--SHE IS
THF DAUGHTER Af ID
CJY1ND DAUGHTER OF Sat-IEBS- f
-I
THE WIDOW AND THC
MOTHER OF MEf VJHO
WEO FOR OUR COUNTRY-
i;
i ctir.crrr vjrr
KV.P-T HER TO pn
oih.- c;rH):PAL n
IC Wlf!' LITTLE t'P
CAM DO r-OR H?S.
BUT FEWHAPS SHE
WOULD LIKE THAT-
1 Frrd Harmon
?)j.i'L.M"iiMi,a
CAPTAIN !
THAT'S TH
GweLLECT
IOFA THATT!
BViti V-WTCHED
ROUHD HERE
YtT I
yTi j
VA 1
1
t3UT YOU LXJN I
MEEO TO WOC.R.Y
TtlE LETTER WAS
ADDRESSKD "TO A
GIRL NAMED
..... ,
13 SHF AfT
lO 'II'LL
AMYONK. what
THC LETTCP,
HILDA GRUBBLE.' CtJTAiriED?
a
n
c'orfiiTwrTM
By Harold Gray?
" " "
I'LL MAVC To BE MODEST. MR.-
Kf.wr.' Hilda n.ms A secret
THE &A,'K WAY A SCREEN DCC'
HOLOj fiACk it-IB RAIN
21 Muck.
23 New Bruns
wick (abbr.).
24 Symbol for
selenium.
25 Comes back. '
27 Negative.
29 Burst
30 Harem.
33 Lubricate. '
35 National
- (abbr.).
39 Have
recourse.
40 Frightful
giant
43 Fall In drops.
44 Made of oats.
46 Whirlwind.
48 Forenoon ,
(abbr.).
60 Inner
(comb. form).
51 Great Lake.
54 Monastic title.
55 Provided
with food.
56 Golf device.
57 Sea eagle.
59. Symbol for
scandium.
60 French article
62 Half an em.
63 Electrical
term.
BUT lto 6ETTIM6 tOWWf?luHr THEM MAYBE Y00
DOMESTICATED. NO MAIP... AND CAROL WON'T
EvERyeooyS doim' war pe able to so out
WORK. I TRY TO HELP TO DIMMER WITH ME
A CfcltPKATfON...
I'M LEAVIM6 FOR
FOREliN STRIKE
TOMORROW
T.M.iir, u.-i rr,un.ttajj By Bloisci);
OIvl f th' heck you SAYl 1
AVC louver 1,61
IIV.r ati 1 I l 1 1 Ii I Mi
LlLL.
Al
3
t:Kll
Wv3
falpown yet. WE' H
MAMAS E IT SOWErLw
EVEN IF WE HAVE
TO TAKS THOMAS
A.N0 JEFFERSON
WITH us;
mm
i-
'UiS fit
a. '
vLU!JSJ By CrancJ
WOW.' Tl-teV 3IJRI
FIXED L9 UFJ DIDW'T
THGV.' BY 309M.
OSCAC.YOU HAD TH
RIOMT DOPE.....
THOSE EAGLES
DOW T MISS
El
IHP-Y, OSCVR. LOOK?.' TZZ I
( WELL.'cOWe (DM.r. LETti"
Rft.ftDLE CVER AMQ
SEE IF VNE CAW'T FIMD
SOME WRECKAGE TO
HMOQ OMTO....WB
CAUT SWIM ALL,
THE WAV TO
CHI MA .'
1
Alley Oop
By V. T. Hartill"