Herald and news. (Klamath Falls, Or.) 1942-current, August 01, 1942, Page 2, Image 2

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    ,PAGB TWO
AXIS GAINS IN
HOLD AT BEND
(Continued from Paga One)
and other targets in northern
France. Six freight trains were
hot up with cannon-fire by low
flying raiders.
Duesseldorf, site of the Rheln-
metal Iron and Steel works,
the Vereinlgte Stahlwerke (Unit
ed Steel Works) and large silk,
paper, patent food factories and
warehouses. It is Germany's
third largest Inland port and the
administration center of the
German steel Industry.
Three Sacton
On the soviet front, bitter all-
night fighting raged in three
main sectors around Kletskaya,
80 miles northwest of Stalin
grad. scene of the bloody nine-
day-old battle of the Don river
bend: at Stimlyansk. 120 miles
southwest of Stalingrad; and be
low Bataisk in the Caucasus.
Front-line dispatches said Cos
sack cavalrymen were lashing
savagely at the Germans while
nazi and red army tanks crush
ed hundreds of acres of wheat
and flames scarred the country
side in the widening battle for
Caucasian oil, railways and sea
ports. Somewhat offsetting the dark
picture below Rostov, Marshal
Semeon Timoshenko's armies
were reported holding their own
and even counter-attacking in
the "battle of the bend" north
west of Stalingrad.
Sacond Front
While a brighter atmosphere
prevailed in Moscow, the soviet
government newspaper . Izvestia
again hinted at the need for a
second front, declaring:
"The main burden of the war
has been borne by the soviet un
ion alone for 13 months . . . The
danger is greater than ever be
fore . . . Hitler fears the day
when other peoples and powers
actively Join the struggle."
u. s. Dowms 9 JAP
c
f- (Continued from Page One)
fighters and four Zero fighters
were destroyed later in the. day.
CHUNGKING, Aug. 1 (Ph
Japanese -troops have landed
. anew on the Chekiang province
coast .this time 30 miles south of
Wenchow, and have started a
drive inland, the Chinese high
. command announced tonight.
Other Japanese forces operat
ing from Wenchow and the in
land Chekiang town of Lishui
have recaptured Tsingtien, 22
miles inland from Wenchow, a
communique said.
Farther west, in eastern Ki
angsl province, heavy casualties
were reported in the Invaders
. south of Kwangfeng.
Returns Frank Haram is
again in the city after having
spent several days in Portland
in connection with the hearing
of a case involving the buying
of liquor for an Indian. He said
he was disappointed in not be
ing able to confer with J. T.
Summerville, whom he is to
succeed as U. S. marshal for
Oregon, since Summerville is
spending some time in Washing
ton, D. C.
TOO LATE TO
CLASSIFY
FOR SALE, TRADE, RENT
3-ropm bachelor cabin, 205
. Donald street. Make offer.
Phone 6612. 8-1
FOR RENT Clean 3-room mod
ern furnished cottage, $20.
1235 Adams, 2326tf
FOR SALE Two children's
bunk beds, reasonable. 3802
Bisbee. Phone 7365. 8-1
MALE Pekinese pup for sale,
$10. 1180 Crescent. 8-3
$75 WORTH OF mechanic's
tools and steel locker chest
sell for $25. 2535 Orchard
Way after 8 p. m. 8-3
WANTED Unfinished house or
houses to be remodeled.
Lloyd W. Rush, 1621 Arthur,
t Phone 3405. 8-7
FOR SALE Wood-coal circula
tor heater, steel davenette.
1621 Arthur. 8-1
FOR RENT Cool housekeep
ing or sleeping rooms, Close
in, $2.50 week. Phone 7058.
81
WANTED '37 or later model
; Harley Davidson motorcycle,
without tires. Must be bar
gain for cash. Dial 3203. 8-5
APARTMENT 2 rooms and
bath, lawn, shade. Hot Springs
district. Telephone 3401. 8-4
FOUR-ROOM house, furnished,
and garage, $20, Chris Huck,
1320 Pleasant. Dial 6470. 8-4
CAUCASUS
REDS
10,000 Too Many
Jops in Aleutians,
Johnson Says
(Continued from rage One)
the undefended Pribilofs, 250
miles northwest of Dutch Har
bor. "We aren't In a position to
say that they aren't there, but
have no evidence that they are,"
he said, adding that American
naval filers had "seen no Jans"
during observation trips over the
Pt-thtlnf tttlanfls.
Delegate Anthony Dimond of ;
Alaska had reported receiving
"slight circumstantial evidence" !
of Japanese activity in the
Pribilof islands, the world's rich-,
st RpAlino arounds.
Army and navy aircraft have
bombed Japanese land installa
tions on the three occupied is
lands repeatedly, the naval
spokesman said, but results have
nnt hppn determined. American
planes and submarines have sunk
eight Jap ships and damaged tu,
one of them so badly it probably
went to the bottom.
(Continued from Page One)
convoy of seven destroyers and
one cruiser off southern Greece.
At least one bomber scored hits
on the transport.
U. S. bombers set many med
ium fires in the Tobruk dock
area earlier in the week. One
blare Svhich spread over a large
area was believed to have been
a gasoline storage dump.
Several ships were hit in a
raid on Suda bay in Crete.
"Repair facilities in Eritrea
are beginning to show results."
the communique said, "many
planes are now flying again
after being wrecked in opera
tions." The United States started
erecting a vast supply and re
pair base in Eritrea many
months ago.
CAIRO, Aug. 1 (AP) The
Cairo area was . bombed last
night, the second time this
week, and five persons were
killed and 12 injured, it was
announced officially today.
The several bombs that fell.
however, caused only slight
damage.
Warnings also were sounded
In Alexandria and the Suez
Canal area- and several prov
inces of upper and lower Egypt.
(Continued from Page One)
at Victory House, while stamp
buying went on steadily at
Eighth and Main streets, where ;
Standard of California war sav-1
ings equipment was set up. I
A feature of a Friday riight j
auction was the bid of $1000 !
bond offered by Bill Dinsmore, j
local oil distributor, for a pair 1
of silk hose. Merchandise don
ated by Klamath merchants was '
offered for bidding, and hun- ;
dreds of dollars in stamps and
bonds were sold in this manner.
A final auction will be held
Saturday night.
Bond sales at Victory House :
started Saturday before the pro
gram got underway. By mid- -afternoon
they mounted to near- ;
ly S5000. On Friday night, a i
$1000 bond was purchased by I
the AFL carpenters' union here.
Variety
A variety of entertainment j
was offered on the program ar- j
ranged by the Klamath Falls j
Klwanis club, with all acts don- !
ated for the war savings cause.
Friday night features includ
ed music by the Oregon Hill i
Billies, a demonstration by Jack
Peebler's weight lifters, songs
by the Commandos, a first aid
demonstration, and accordion
numbers by Dolores Morris and
Betty Sweeney.
Saturday numbers Included a
trumpet solo by Frank Curry,
vocal selections by the Kiwanis
octotto, sons by Mary Ma
honcy, marimbaphone solo by
Dorothy Laurenson, a program
by the Moldovan school of
dance, selections by the Musical
Moores and Mr. and Mrs. Emil
Buzald, a song by Eddie Bur
roughs, and Nancy Kelly's fam
ed rope twirling act.
Miss Patrlca Brown sang the
Star Spangled Banner to close
Friday and Saturday programs
Recovering Mrs. Ray Brau
ner of 1316 California avenue
Is reported to be recovering
from an Illness which has kept
her confined to her home since
July 4. It is thought she will be
able to be about again In a
week.
Insure your ear with Hani
Norland, 118 North 7th street.
MGET THE
fMOST HEAT
Out of Your Oil!
LM Ul iirvln Your Sumtr Nowl
Call ler Hint at -.
If I ... M ..
aiomnrfl wil vo
Phon 8404
AFL SIGNS
NEI
CONTRACT
IT
BIG LAKES BOX
Klamath headquarters of the
ALF Lumber and Sawmill
Workers uhiou announced today
that negotiations had been suc
cessfully completed and a new
collective bargaining contract
signed between local 2511 of
the AFL-LSW and the manage
ment of the Big Lakes Box com
pany. The contract was a renewal
of an agreement existing be
t w e n the company and the
union for the past year and in
cluded provisions for complete
union shop, checkoff system,
work cards for all new em
ployes, week's vacation with
pay and that wage adjustments
may be taken up at any time.
Harold McKenzie of the union
said there will be no strikes or
lockouts for the duration of the
war and that disputes which
cannot be settled by the local
committee will go into arbitra
tion. Other clauses call for the
payment of vacation wages to
all employes entering the armed
services if they were working
for the company prior to June
1, 1941.
The announcement said that
group insurance is in effect and
all complaints are handled
through a union committee.
Officials of the union ex
pressed themselves as pleased
with the new agreement, sched
uled to run until July 31, 1943.
VITAL STATISTICS
HOUSTON Born at Klam
ath Valley hospital July 31,
1942, to Mr. and Mrs. H. B.
Houston, 916 Grant street, a
girl. Weight: 8 pounds 6V
ounces.
If we possessed the crushing
superiority in air power which
enabled us to protect a landing
of our military forces, we need
no longer think in terms of inva
sion. The war is then all but
over. William Ziff, publisher of
"Flying" magazine.
ESQUIRE 0 STARTING TONIGHT AT
THE STAR TEAM OF "KINGS ROW" . . TOGETHER
AGAIN .... IN LOVE AGAIN I
Ann Sheridan as a "Nickel-A-Dance." Darling, Lovely to Look At . .
But Dangerous to Love! A Sensational Story of the "Juke Joints!"
with RICHARD WHORF
taBsEsj
Last Tim
Tonight!
HERALD AND NEWS. KLAMATH FALIS. OREGON
Boy Bruised
In Accident
Floyd Pike, 12, of 44 Flolsh
hacker street, suffered bruises
when he was struck Friday
morning by a car driven by
Mrs. H. D. Mortonson oit Main
street. In reporting to police.
Mrs. Mortenson said the boy
ran Into the street in front of
her car, but she was going slow
ly enough so that the impact
merely bumped him, knocking
him down.
Mayor John 11. Houston and
Jens L. Anderson reported
minor damage to their cars re
sulting from tin intersection
crash at Ninth and Pine streets.
PACIFIC FINANCE
SELLS TO
Announcement was made In
Portland Friday by E. B. Mac
Naughton, president of the First
National bank of Portland, that
the bank had purchased the
Oregon assets of the Pacific Fi
nance corporation of California
In the form of notes, contracts,
and other receivables due the
corporation.
For the time being, the Pa
cific Finance corporation office
will be continued, for the con
venience of its many customers.
Payments due the Pacific Fi
nance corporation, however, can
be made at any branch of the
First National bank throughout
the state.
William Bell, vice president
of the Pacific Finance corpora
tion, and his staff will continue
in their former capacities. Bell
will also become a vice presi
dent of the bank. He has had a
long and successful career with
the Pacific Finance corporation
and is widely known In the
automobile trade throughout the
northwest.
. In commenting on the tran
saction, both MacNaughton and
Bell expressed pleasure in its
consummation. The Pacific Fi
nance corporation of California
has operated on a coast-wide
basis for many years princi
pally in the field of automobile
loans.
Herald and News want ads
reach 40,000 individuals. Some
one wants what you have to sell.
Advertise in the classified.
GEORGE TOBIAS GENE LOCKHART
Scrttn Play by A. I. Bauiridat From Story by Thaodor. Pratt
liUNI
Norma Shearer Molvyn Douglas
"WE WERE DANCING"
0FS0L0IN
I
(Continued from Pago One)
Japanese patrols have clashed
recently within 60 miles of Port
Moresby, advance allied base,
tho land situation was described
as "static," but allied bombers
raided the Japanese-occupied
village of Buna in the (I una
mission area and started two
large fires.
Editorials on News
(Continued From Page One)
tin all probability) to get near
enough tu attack it with land
based planes.
ADMIRAL V1CKERY, chair
man of tho maritime com
mission, reports Unit U. S. pro
duction of merchant ships will
hit four a day by January 1.
During June and July, it run
about two a day just about
equaling submarine sinkings.
That situation is what is put
ting steam behind the cargo air
ship proposal.
-ONSERVAT1VE Insiders, on
whoso shoulders RESPON
SIBILITY rests, are afraid the
cargo-carrying airship Idea won't
work. Hence their hesitation.
Tho same typo of mind was
afraid the Monitor wouldn't
work, but If the Monitor hadn't
been in Hampton Roads when
the Merrimac went on the loose
U. S. history would doubtless
have been changed.
V
A IRCRAFT engineers disclose
to a senate military sub
committee that they have de
signed a revolutionary type of
cargo-carrying plane lifted and
propelled by engines, HELIUM
GAS and air tunnels. They say
it could be used as a sky-roaming
CARRIER of a dozen speedy
fighting planes.
This gives us some idea of
how swiftly airplane design is
progressing.
Words alone can make no man
understand the ungentle rain
from heaven of bombs and
screaming steel. Capt. Eric
Knignt, U. S. army author.
ALAN HALE BETTY BREWER Directed
Adaptation by Kannath Oamat A Wamsr
ISLANDS
KEN
BASE
"TOP SERGEANT"
Andy Dovina Leo Carrillo
and
Vital Hub in
Klamath War ttrort
(Continued from Page One)
tho species is fully as capable of
turning out a day's work in a
surprisingly large number of de
partments us are Mrs. America's
husbands and sons.
Woman Waldert
So now Mr. Fitch's school is
turning out women welders and
sheet metal workers between the
ages of 17 and 50 who are going
to work for Douglas, Columbia
and Boeing at dandy wages but
no sweaters. This Is entirely
acceptable to (a) Douglus, Colum
bia and Hnclng (b) tho women
and (e) the army which can thus
proselyte tho guys who used to
work for (a), so everybody's hap
py all around,
Lost you begin In tlilnk that
all Mr. Fitch does Is train wom
enwhich he does not how
about a few figures? -
Firstly, Mr. Fitch has going
classes In machine shop, general
sheet metnl, welding and air
craft sheet metal. In only the
latter two are women being ac
cepted for training.
In toto, approximately 15 arc
now regularly attending classes;
seven havo graduated to Colnin-
I bla aircraft and two to Douglas.
Important
1 That's only nine graduates out
i of the institution's BOO plus but
firstly, because It's an Innovation
Inrnlly, and secondly, because it's
the beginning of a trend. It's Im
portant to Mr. Fitch, Klamath
Falls and tho nation.
Men still constitute the bulk
of the training school's enroll
ment, however. On tho average,
Director Fitch finds some 10 In
his aircraft sheet motnl class, 21
in his machine shop, 20 In gen
eral sheet metal, and 72 In his
welding division when he looks
at hit figures.
But, and we'll insert a plug,
that doesn't mean the classes are
full. Continual turnover as stu
dent graduate or leave gives
new enrollees a chance without
much, or any. wait. And Mr
Fitch is constantly on the peck
for new talent. He says you can
apply at tho United States Em
ployment service office. That
screaming we hear is the adver
tising department.
Grids Sent Out
That tho Immediate country
side is producing for Industry
can be discerned by skipping
over the following statistics of
graduates sent out to war Jobs
since. May, 1941:
Aircraft sheet metal 150
Welding 160
MIDNIGHT!
by CURTIS BERNHARDT
Broi. - Clrat National Picture
Carpentry .... 1"
Machine Shop 40
General sheet metal 14
Radio ... 30
Most of Director Fitch's peo
ple work from four In night
hours on each of six days to ac
complish their school work. He
memliur, Inn, folks, that virtual
ly all of them are putting In full
or better stretches on their reg
ular Jobs and going to school In
their own time.
And they must keep at It for
up to 300 hours, or about 10
weeks before Industry will laku
'em In as experienced workers.
Industry also requires that they
furnish their own tools and cloth j
Ing and somebody else -you p
know who says they must In'-1
long to a union. Which besides
being nice business for the un
ion Is also another story.
No Tuition
As for tuition fur luiiinlnH
thero Isn't any. The cost of the
whole caboodle Is borne by you
and me through Ihu U. S. Office
of Kductlnn and handled through
thp Orrgtm State Dcpa. Ism-nt of
Education,
Class space Is donated by the
high school,
We guess that on account of
you're paying for II. you'd like
to know how much it's costing.
Well, fir.it off, Mr. Fitch says,
thero was an Item for some
$57,000 spent In equlplng sev
eral rooms In the Imsetneiil of
the high school gym. This liui
been swelled by further pur
chases, say In the amount of
$10,000. since the schnul was
first established.
Monthly Upko.p
Then there're such requisites
as monthly upkeep In tho way
of Instructor's salaries, raw ma
terials, power, new tools, etc.
That breaks down like this:
Aircraft sheet mutal . $ 300
General sheet metal 350 ;
Machine shop 1200 :
Welding 2500
The total $1350 each month,
Add to that $200 spent In the
single month's existence of a
carpentry class BNC (Before
Newell, Calif.) and an estimated
ACRES OF FREE PARKING!
v
Continuous From Noon
ROAR OF THE PRESS"
wiih
Wallace Ford J.an Park.r
srnsi
"JUNIOR O MEN
SUNDAY & MONDAY ONLY!
Look! - First Klamath Showing I
INTRIGUE
IN THE
JUNGLE!
Nations fight
for the
posession of
the priceless
"Vioo Mezi"!
r 'a jk
PLUS THIS
ON A MUNSON
DON TERRY '
. STUART ERWIN RICHARD LANE 11
BUGS BUNNY COLOR CARTOON WAR
"ALL THIS AND RABBIT 8TB W" MEWS
Yugunt 1, IIMj
s-juoO In radio which has alnC(
been discontinued.
Tutu Uii the llnlud figures for
12 months tho average ImiRih
of operation of the various
classes and you gel 4,00U.
Added to uu upproxliuuu
U5,U0U equipment Cost, II mvoi
you $1 1U.UUU in round miiiiliuri.
Nobody wauls to bo quoted uu
this figure, you'll uiidei tiunj,
uui luuKiiiy i""1 i1- f
l'or Student Coil ;
II requires no calculus to it s
$230 as yuur approximate par. ,
student training cost. And r.
nu mber Unit with each nioiiiii I
the pel-capita cost slides down- I
wurd, because, all that expemlvs f
equipment Is paid for. i
And If It money's worth ;
you re looking for, remember '
I -nil Hurbor. And then i. '
member the WI'A.
Wo don't hear any grunting, '
Do you? 1
Candidates in f
17 States Vie j
For Election
(Continued froin Page One)
blued ages total 242 yean mid ;
congressional service, 105 yean, 1
Tho outcome of the Kum
lepubllciui gubernatorial fight
ml Virginia democratic con.
giessliiiuil i-oillcsl will be watch
ed, too, because of tho lulor
Issue Involved,
(.)( the nine congressional cll. ,
ti iets In Kentucky, the content
between tho state's only rrpiih.
Ili-nii In congress veteran John '
Itnblsoit and Eugene E. Slier.
lawyer-World war veteran, stood f
out because Slier raised the li
sue of "Isolationism" nfalnil '
Hobslon.
CONDON. Aug. I (AI')Th
Klnxim pine, mill plant, 40 nillt-i
southeast of here, was partially
closed today ny n lire.
All overheated motor wai
blamed for the binge, which wn
brought under control yesterriiv
by the efforts of employes tnii
residents of Klniuu,
The undamaged sawmill prop
er continued operation. 1
Today and Tomorrowl
TODAY ONLY!
ZOOMING to a
new high In acllonl
RICHARD ARLEN
Jaan Park.r H.l.n Mack
Rog.r Pryor
AND!
OF THE AIR" Serial
r'ii - ;'rT - v
2ND ACE HIT!
EXTHAI
T