Herald and news. (Klamath Falls, Or.) 1942-current, June 16, 1942, Page 10, Image 10

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    tAOW TEW
HERALD AND NEWS, KLAMATH FALLS,. OREGON ' '
J line. 10. 1042
SIXKLAMATH
MILLS POST
IE
Hard on the heels of a grant
j;i Tragc ir.cciocb to CIO lum
ber workers, at least six large
Klamath area mills employing
AFL and non-union labor were
reported Monday to have posted
notices of 7s-cent per ' hour
boosts. v
It was reported from an em-
uloyer source that Algoma Lfim-
ber company, Crater take Box
and Lumber company, Weyer
haeuser Timber company, Shaw
Lumber company, Kalpine Ply
wood company and the Conifer
Lumber company had all brought
their minimum wages up to 80
cents per hour. Carl Huson of
Conifer said that his boost raised
base pay from 70 to 80 cents.
Officials of other firms were
unavailable.
It was also understood that
three Lakeview sawmills had
raised their minimum scales to
80 cents. '
The. Increases followed by 10
days a War Labor board de
clsion giving , some 4500 CIO
workers In the union's Klamath
district council jurisdictional
range increases' of 71 cents. The
boost - benefited approximately
1500 workers ln the immediate
Klamath vicinity.': -. ..
..Meanwhile no tangible reports
came out of an intensive four
day conference between repre
sentatives of the AFL district
council, a department of labor
conciliation panel and more than
15 - employers' of AFL labor
which came to' an end Saturday.
- Hugh Haddock, president of
the council said that, "nothing
definite was settled," while an
other source said that the fac
tions were in virtual agreement
on a 71-cent pay increase which
would bring the minimum scale
of AFL workers to 80 cents. The
council had previously an
nounced it was seeking a 90-cent
base rate.. : . .
: Status of negotiations over an
AFL demand for a complete
Union ship, an eight-hour day and
consecutive five-day. week was
undetermined.
Haddock said, however,; that
negotiations will continue. He
declained to specify whether
they would be conducted, on an
individual per-company basis or
with a group of employers.
AFL negotiations with Klam
ath district employers have been
on an off-again-on-again . basis
since last February when the
: union asked that employers form
a bargaining association. The
Pine Industrial Relations com
mittee, born" of the request, last
met with the union in May. The
union then broke off relations on
the grounds that all members of
the PIRC committee were not
employers of AFL labor.
Officers of Elks
To Attend Meet
Officers of Klamath Falls
Elks lodge will participate in
the state ritualistic contest at the
State Elks convention to be held
- In Bend Thursday, Friday -and
Saturday of this week. There
will be no meeting of the local
lodge Thursday evening because
the officers will be In Bend.:
Robert Thompson of Klamath
Falls, president of the state as
sociation, and L. Orth Slsemore
will leave for Bend Wednesday
afternoon to be present at the
opening of the convention. The
ritualistic team will leave Thurs
day. Due to- wartime shortages.
pelicans in the London zoo have
been taught to eat meat instead
of fish.
Lobsters, snails, and oysters
are the world's only real "blue
bloods," according to science.
; Paul O. Landry
this question:' :
"I understand you ' air
,now offering' a Fur Float-
er policy that will . protect
my wife's fur coat, against
all Insurable hasards 24
hours a day. 365 - days . a
: year. Is It true that we can
relieve ourselves - of this
worry at a cost of less
than one monthly install-
' ment on a new coat?". ,
For Information on any
insurance problem, consult
the Landry Co., 313 Main
St. , Phona 8812. "The
Courthouse Is Just Across
Main Street From: Our
Office."
IE
BOOSTS
mm
. 11
Where
Nnni . ' NEW
IRELAND . MILES
i GUINEA NEW TV 1
. solomon Pacific Ocean
f Work JsOMAiD V
Mv - . . Coral .
icOOKTOWN r ' NEW
w-Tr- Barrier
AUSTRALIA caudon..
Sequence of the famed Coral sea battle, revealed as follows! On May 4. U. S. naval force
attacked Japs , off Tulagt (1),- on Florida Island in Solomon group, with U. S. carrier-based
planes sinking 10 Jap ships) on Mar 6 allied naval forces sent squadron to Intercept Jap force in
Jomard strait (2); on May 7 American carrier planes surprised Jap aircraft off Miaima island (3),
sinking Jap carrier and light cruiser! later May 7 land-based Jap bombers attacked allied squad
off Papua (4). a V. S. tanker was sunk between New Caledonia (5), and Australia) on May 8
U. S. planes attacked Jap- force 30 miles east of Rossel island (6), in first known naval battle
between aircraft carrier)' beginning the evening of May 8 Jap force apparently headed toward
Port Moresby (7), began to withdraw, thus ending temporarily Invasion attempt of southern Mew
Guinea or northern Australia. . . - -
Safety Engineering Defense
Course Slated for Tonight
A tuition-free defense training
course In safety engineering,
part of a statewide training plan
under the auspices of the na
tional committee for the con
servation of manpower in war
industries, will start tonight In
the Klamath Union high school,
it was announced today.
Sponsored by the United
States office of Education, and
designed to develop safety en
gineers, the course is open to
any high school graduate or on
who has an acceptable equiva
lent in shop experience. Accord
ing to Miles Murray, class organ
izer, preference will be given to
key supervisory employers di
rectly concerned with V plant
safety.
Murray, assistant to the gen
eral safety supervisor of the
Crown - Zellerbach corporation
and representative of the man
power conservation committee,
said that 1000 industrial engin
eers will be needed annually in
the country for the next ten
years if the rising tide of plant
accidents is to be checked. He
said the course is being con
ducted through the cooperation
of . the state industrial accident
commission, the Portland society
of Industrial engineers and the
school of engineering and Indus-
Your best bet for
FATHER'S DAY
OWant to get ldssef
on Father"! Day?
boxful of Van Heutcnsi -.
He's been reading about)
them in Life and The:
,' Saturday' Evening Posti -In
Esquire and Collier1!
... all about thtamaxinf 1
collar that no other shirt
can have. Van Heusensj '
are cut to a custom paN ;
tern and really fit across
. that vital "dis- From'
play tone." Su
perlattve white
or pattern!. t.
rudys
; Men's Shop i
, 8th and Main '
Coral Sea Battle Was
trial arts of Oregon State col
lege.
Murray said that the course
has the backing of virtually
every Klamath mill and listed
the Kesterson Lumber company,
Ewauna Box company, B i g
Lakes Box company. Pelican
Bay Lumber company, Algoma
Lumber company, Klamath
Lumber and Box company,
Long-Bell Lumber company.
Kalpine Plywood company and
the Weyerhaeuser Timber com
pany as some of those sending
men, to tonight's opening class.
Class hours will be from.7:30
to 10 each Tuesday night in
Room 208. In the high school.
Although no tuition fees are re
quired, each student must buy
lextoooKs ana notebooks. A
This is a Black Out
A wartime necessity, it makes people ' '
grope their way from place to place trying
"to go where they want to go, trying to get
to the things they need even in wartimes.
8p
This is a Newspaper
It gives directions, too. Its ad
vertisements point the way to
values. They show you what goods
competitive merchants are offer
ing, tell you when and where you
can buy them, where to get the
most value for your money.
Fought
complete set of lecture and ref
erence material will be furnish
ed at no cost.
M. T. Owre of the Pine Indus
trial Relations committee will be
the instructor. Ted Durment of
the Weyerhaeuser Timber com
pany is aiding organization of
the class, Murray said..
Second Civilian
Defense Class
Slated for Tonight
Second session of the series
in civilian defense training will
be held at 7:30 o'clock Tuesday
night in the Klamath Union
high school auditorium.
- Subjects to be covered will
Include blackout, medical aux
iliary service, civil air patrol
and police service.
Canada's 1940 cherry crop
amounted to 145,400 bushels.
This is a Lighted Sigr
It pierces the darkness . . . keeps
. people from groping . . . gives them
the direction they need to go where
they need to go. ' ; ' '
During a war, time is valuable. Money
must be spent wisely. Savings must be made
; to pay war taxes and buy Victory Bonds.
Because it saves your time and your
money, by guiding you quickly to, the, best
values, newspaper advertising is more im
portant than ever during the war. '
HERALD - NEWS
Frank Jenkins, Publisher
MEMBER, THE NEWSPAPER PUBLISHERS COMMITTEE ' '
T
AGE LIMIT TO 55
War time expansion . ot the
U. S. Coast Guard has created a
great demand for men. In order
to enlarge Its war-time comple
ment, the Coast Guard is now
accepting men for reserve en
listment if they are between the
ages ot 17 and 05, in good phy
sical condition. 1 -
The former age limits were 17
to 35. This new regulation will
make available a large store of
men with valuable experience
who wero left untouched before.
A variety of vacancies are open
to men with experience, it was
announces. Radio operators,
cooks, dlesel and gas engine me
chanics, aviation mechanics, av
iation metalsmiths, carpenters,
phnrmaclsts, stenographers, or
small boat operators may be
given ratings as petty officers
provided their training is deem
ed sufficient. If a man is not
skilled in a trade, the Coast
Guard will train him in one ot
its many technical schools.
High school graduation is no
longer required. Information
may be obtained from the re
cruiting officer. Room 30f, Pio
neer Post Office, Portland.
Two Return From
John Day Country
With Eggs, Agates
Dr. A. A. Soule and W. J.
Shook have : returned from a
week's vacation trip which took
them into the John Day country.
They two gathered agates and
thunder eggs from the 90,000-
acre Prlday ranch in Jefferson
county and found some quartz
geodes and many ' polka dot
agates. In the John Day canyon
they found many fossils, among
which was a ' portion of a
dinosaur's jaw probably a hun
dred million years old, Dr. Soule
stated.
Some beautifully colored pic
tures of wild flower! and geolog
ical formation! were made. A
large greenish rattlesnake was
killed. The make boasted Six
rattles and a button and Dr.
Soule said the skin wis to be
made into a hat band.
A Mr. Silvertooth, pioneer ot
Antelope, gave the two much In
formation on rocka and the his-
Tough Tar and Tommy Gun
IT V
"...
.3 ' ,i. S
Flerce-vlsaged British snllor lets his hnlr down end goes into action
covering a destroyer's bonrtllng pnrty during "nwny boarders" drill.
He's armed with Tommy gun and service revolver
tory of the country which was
useful to Dr. Soule, who Is writ
Ins the storv of his father's trln
across tho plains, ho said.
Principal raw materials for
TNT is toluol, produced chiefly
In by-product coke ovons.
mMSmw&:y cover M$tk r 1 " - -,
FOR ONIY $20.28 .. ' PrJ
tP!. V For material! only! Aik 2 1. I
KCvtffiZs about our exrlnstal.eTiCK, I
l&ii-y&l X lationscrvicel ;fi5592,i
mm
'A
U. S. VE8UEL TORPEDOED
WASHINGTON, June 18 (P)
Tho navy announced todny that
a mcdUim-sltod United States
merchant vessel had been tor
pedoed in the Gulf of Mexico
and thnt survivors had been
landed at a gulf coast port.
Rich tlle-llka effedil PaHerns
Inlaid through to a burlap backl
Start your ideal kitchen now with '
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Artmtrofts Str.lsMliw . InLltf
ARMSTRONG'S LINOFLOR
Unusual Beauty of a Monty-Saving Low Prktl
Sensational opportunity to cover any room in your home .
with genuine Linoleum on Felt Back. Rich marble pat-i
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Armstrong Quaker Floor
12 ft. Wide lor Seamleii
Now you can cover even a big room
from wall-to-wall without a team
Because ' famous Armstrong Quaker
come! in 12-ft. roll! . ... the. only,
covering that's made so wide ! It'!
nationally known for wear . . . and for
tho wide choice of pattern! ! ,
rmitrong Standard Floor Covering, 12 ft. wide, 60c iq. yd
Bring Room Meaiuremenli for Free Estimateil "'
MONTGOMERY WARD
Girl Scouts Asked
To Finish "Fag
Bags" by June 20
An urgont plea lini gone out
to ' Qlrl ScouU of Klamath
county from Miss Esther Ansel,
Portlund regional Scout execu
tive, urging all Girl Scouts, both
Individuals and troops, who have
been working on the "fug bag
project," to have all their quota
of tag hB residy and delivered
not later than June 20. In mak
Ing her appeal to locnl Scout
Lender Edna Knvnnnuuh, Miss
Ansel pointed out that the bags
must be ready for distribution
starting with the weekend of
July 4, as thnt Is a time when
flro hazard In the forests Is
greatest.
The Girl Scouts of Oregon
have undertaken to make 50,000
"fag bags." These are small red
colored bags with a draw string,
Just large enough to hold a pack
ago of cigarettes and a fnw
matches. The bags are handed to
smoker upon entry into forest
lands at ranger stations and
service stations and sporting
goods stores. .
Our most accurate time clock
Is the spinning earth, which loses
only about one second In a century.
v;,'
q. yd.
Is
Covering I
Floonl