The Evening herald. (Klamath Falls, Or.) 1906-1942, February 20, 1934, Page 6, Image 6

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    I'AdE SIX
HBalK HBRB TODAI
WKAVBH ara awnrlfa la 'Till
Ynrk la. !SJtM,,l lM
mmnj Willi r"
alaaoa la laa Jll' Kf"?!?
aula aaarea. "rPO
aallaaaaa frlaada. Taa "'
a taalr ko.frmoon la T"'
Hack a !. lalaa btara.
and ka Mlaaaa (a to Karopa.
Llla ainaels o lira la laar. kul
GrpiT Intrnda la kf hn Ink. aa
trackrr la a aetlleawal ao.
TOW 00 ON WITH TUB (TORT
CHAPTER II
OCTOBER, Gypsy thought. wa
exhilarating In U city. It
ni 1 season, It held a mood, which
belonged to Fifth Avenue, with Iti
woll-draaaed women. Its alluring
displays behind plate glasa win
dow. Their little apartment. It la true,
was a good long trek from the
Arenue fire long blocks, In fact,
but Gypsy and Tom admired It
none the less and felt smart and
urban because they now belonged
In "the upper East Side" class. It
was the first home Gypsy had erer
known, other than the shabby
mansarded house in Blue Kills.
And It was so different in all re
spects, so compact and shining and
modern.
They had decided against llrlng
In a made-over "walk-up," as those
apartments which hare been
wrested from the interior of stately-
old brown-stona fronts arc
called in Manhattan. Both Gypsy
and Tom were tired ot old houses,
or thought they were, anyhow. The
big, square, cream-colored block ot
apartments which they chose,
with its tiled lobby and self-steer-lng
elerator, seemed the last word
In comfort and convenience to
them. That is, it did nntU they
first caught a glimpse ot LUa's
place. But I am getting ahead ot
my story.
Their own particular cubbyhole
consisted ot two rooms, a Urlng
room and bedroom, and a kitchen
and bath. The kitchen, in that
quaint fashion known peculiarly to
' the New York apartment dweller,
opened directly on the entrance
hall, and the upper half ot the door
which dosed it off was made ot
frosted glass. This distressed
Gypsy mildly, but she numbered a
handsome Japanese screen, all coll
ing dragons and flying birds,
among her wedding presents, and
this effectively hid the Tiew from
guests. '
The whole place was finished
pleasantly It unlnsplredly in a
cream-colored plaster, marked off
by imitation paneling. Gypsy, used
to tha faded papers and lirer col
ored paint ot the bouse in Blue
Bills, thought It rery modish and
restful. She and Tom mored in on
October first, tha last day of their
vacation, and hung pictures,
pushed furniture about, and estab
lished in their spick and span
kitchen the treasures In tinware
and glass which they triumphantly
brought home from the ten-cent
store.
"Isnt it perfect?" Gypsy, her
brown curls pushed back, a smudge
on her charming nose, her frock
completely hidden by a coverall ot
'blue linen, demanded approval ot
her labors. The little room snone
with cleanliness and fresh paint
and good wllL The day-bed. up
holstered In green mohair, occupied
the longest wall space. There were
two Windsor chairs and a drop leaf
table. There was an un painted
bookshelf. There were one or two
nice black and whit prints. The
casual onlooker might have pro
nounced the room balf-furnlshed,
as indeed it was, bare ot rugs and
curtains and cushions, but to the
young Wearers it seemed perfec
tion and therefore was.
"Later, of course," Gypsy
planned, "we'll get some deep
chairs and some rugs. We simply
can't manage them yet and what
does it matter!"
a . a a
TOM, who had been hanging pic
tures, stepped down from his
stool to embrace her. What a
darling she was, how good, and
brave and beautiful! Why, she
might hare bad everything, this
girl, and she had chosen Instead to
link her way with his! He couldn't
believe in his luck, quite yet
They picnicked in the kitchen
that evening, enjoying a scrambled
meal ot canned beans and crisp
bacon and salad. It was fun It
was all fun from setting the table
with a checked cloth to washing
. the blue and white dishes.
Tou'll hare to get some sort of
part-time maid, Tom told her,
firmly. "You can't work all day
with those kids and come home to
beds and dishes."
"We'll see about that," Gypsy
said. But privately she was sure
she was equal to anything. Let's
see , . . she got (28 a week at the
Settlement, and Tom's salary was
175 now. He'd had to take two
reductions. That was more than
1100 a week. It seemed riches to
the girl. Back In Blue Hills there
had never been anything so glori
ous, so utterly marvellous, as a
regular income. Daddy bad a way
ot defending penniless clients, and
even when the cases he took were
those of rich people, the latter had
a way of letting their bills run.
Tom had lighted his pipe, was
relaxing at ease on the day-bed.
Gypsy went down the hall to con
template, for the hundredth time,
the bedroom. She loved every
inch of it, from the green and
white counterpanes, reproductions
of some old pattern, to the dress
ing table, which, draped In green
and white organdie, had cost the
startling sum of Sill The beds
wore low-poBted, of imitation ma
hogany. ' There was a hooked
rug on the floor. In a week
or two, she told herself, there
would be apple-green curtains flut
tering tvt tbo windows and a lamp
or two to add notes of charm,
a a a .
TUB phone rang and she ran to
answer It She sounded Impor
tant and young matronly, to her
alt.
"Tom, I think It's long distance,"
she aald, holding her band against
tha mouthpiece. "They're so long
about it j. ,a.M Her. heart began
MABEL
McELUUH
to beat rather fast." Pernaps it was
Mother! Perhaps she was really
III, this time.
"Yes. Yes." Her ' expression
changed, ever so slightly. "It's
Mrs. Weaver, speaking. No, not hit
mother, his wife.
Glacially she spoke to the tall,
falr-balred young man beside her.
"Someone for you. Tom."
She went back Into the llrlng
room the telephone was in the
hall and tried not to listen. Tom's
voice was stilt with embarrassment
and something else. What waa It
all aboutt A high, Imperious, fem
inine voice summoning him from
some unknown place, Gypsy had
made up her mind, long ago as
long ago as last June, In fact when
the and Tom bad become engaged
not to be a suspicions wife. But
ihe couldn't help the sudden-out-sropplng
ot a perfectly natural
jealousy. Her resolutions faded In
tbe face ot It
"Yes, that's great How awk
ward Tom sounded) What was this
mysterious woman saying, to make
htm so stiff and unnatural? "Why,
I certainly wish I could. Dldnt
rou know about it? I thought
s very body ..."
There was a long pause. Then
ha said, with forced brightness. "I
tell you what you come and have
lunch with Gypsy with my wife
and ma That would be better
wonldnt Itr
Gypsy dldnt listen to the rest
She was trying not to be too angry.
Who waa this person who intruded
upon their first night at home?
It wasnt fair.
a a a
npOM came away from tha tele
phone with that auspiciously
too-casual air which young hus
bands often wear, and with which
Gypsy was not yet familiar. Some
thing deep in her bonesy how
erer, recognized It and stiffened to
meet it
"Old girl friend!" Tom yawned.
The yawn, also, was a shade too
theatrical. Gypsy, straightening
books, did not reply.
"I told you about her, darling,"
Tom pursued, coming np to her,
and slipping his arms around her.
"Vera Gray I saw quite a lot ot
her when I worked in Boston, you
remember."
Gypsy remembered, quite clearly,
all she had heard of this Vera per
son. She was big and beautiful
In a full-blown way, Roslna had
told her. She had been making
"a dead set for Tom," according to
Roslna, when Gypsy bad come upon
tbe scene. Tom and Gypsy had
known each other In childhood, but
hadnt met until a little more than
a year ago, at a stndlo party. Tom,
just back from Boston, feeling his
way about an unfamiliar city in bis
new Job, had taken one look at
Gypsy and promptly relinquished
the full-blown Vera.
"What on earth Is she doing in
town?" Gypsy said, trying to keep
the crossness out of her rolce.
"She's In New Haren," Tom said,
guilelessly. "She was driving down
... dldnt know a thing about
my Big Moment (meaning yon) and
since we were In the new telephone
book, just gave me a ring."
"I see." Gypsy sounded miles
away, and quite as If she didn't
see at all.
"How could I help asking her to
lunch, darling?" Tom coaxed. "She
wanted to see me, for, old-time's
sake, and naturally I want my old
friends to meet my wife."
"Old friends!" Gypsy, pretending
to dust a silver candlestick,
wouldn't meet his eye.
"Look here, darling, what's this
all about?" She melted when Tom
set his aw and talked to her like
that "Aren't you being awfully
Billy?"
"I I guess so."
"Well, stop it, then, and be your
own adorable self. Look your love
liest when yon hare Innch with me
and Vera tomorrow. At tbe Algon
quin, at one. I want her to be prop
erly dazxled by my wife."
"Oh, oh!" Gypsy stared at him,
accusingly. "You know it's my first
day back at work and I cant pos
sibly come that far uptown for
lunch. You knew it!"
"I swear I forgot" Tom looked
resentful. He hated to be put in
the wrong. And yet and yet
wasn't it tbe first of many small
annoyances, when you bad a work
ing wife?
Gypsy's heart was sore.. Their
first evening Jit home had a cloud
on It Tom would be lunching to
morrownot only without her, but
with another woman!
(To Be Continued)
Female eagles are larger than
their mates.
Shoppers who are all wet otten
get soaked.
Flapper Fanny Says
est VjenEf '
OUT OUR WAY By J. R. William. OUR BOARDING HOUSE B Ahern
&2( RUM-RUN I f THIS AINT sfttkt t fv V7 , )..- ..w- V
5 YOU'LL BEAT NO KITE - MR.6WUNCM CUECKE.0 OUT LfJ ':K'i'i
him up, with its th' babv, I iff:::::: . jf tVus mornins and x just omvvf- V '
J I VOUR KITE IN HIS CftRT. tttttttl CD A UEMAD TMM YOU WORE OUT THE wM-TllNTtt-l
V V ,F Y0U RUM y Tl yr- sk -f "BRAsKE LINING OF VOUR THROW, r RECOVER av VOICE.-
0 i yVJL -- TALKING "TO HIM -MEAN V ILLW& CARE OP
' TMV .rVihTrn 1111 i'iPTT rfOTB sw vou vxi know he V tvos6 scounoreja.
7V ' 1 ' ' ' I OILlJ WAS WARD OF UEARlNG? WELL, h CLYDE ANTj MACK,
XrWli I ' I ' WB5 lVE WmEDTHPCTVCSBDVERSSf NOT TELLING,
' I ' I J 1" VMi M ' P S FORSONEBOW TO "BOTTLE ANfc h ME0AT
SflM ((JMMq C CORK VOUU BRACKING ) . 6RUNCW V
- TVy - Jhmf 4 lO' YOU LITERALLY ) S-",
cjeesv -" - p2MPr l YtiM 1 1 6crr laryngitis.
JLs, ' -$111 S JL, ?P rl TALKING TO o J jS K
BssssssBssmseeassrmirmwsg.M. 1 i.aaasa.aBi.iH.1 .1 gasaMaMBaamaBaWa.MBWwawBMs
SALESMAN SAM By Small
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. ovwieMi y'trxuiiMl P6csToNJ ouxxl I b sHcjrjMseoeso! en.ft wcveR even kJ6" opgJ MeB- WOUTW wipei jf t
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iPk LMy Bt OUT 3tlklT. FRotO s J KV'RVBoCrV , UP Cotol rie am' THTS Mr i (S lTA KWvT
BOOTS AND HER BUDDIES
TAMCV STVP'
Ot P.M.,HONE.yf
FRECKLES AND HIS
' ,L- ---B-
WASHTUBBS . ' . BV Crape
! ; -, .... l oe AlU lf MO USE I CAN TELL. AND IV VOU 1 IP IT WEREN'T JAY! 5PHCA0 A " 7 HY, DA WO YOUR HIDES I I MATE SAVlMd
(r Vvl 5SwV toNG0 M WU GAIL Llv"wu'0 f ES PES. I WOULDN'T MISS THE . ft SURE I FOR NOU, WE'D V ISSm Cf tmU, ) f MOOBV. TOO.. 1 IM Y00. BUT THERE'S
afrJ a?J ahd iVVtwmt and m Tfor anything, r-l m KK rm BRoxeJl vw old potatoes. no uje trH6 weepy about njjftiJU
'W m 7 I CUMMER - J X 1 SWELL ,K " lwHt ANV60DV 0 THINK VOU f v ,' '
i- CET TO W0M..J f JHMER, -"J . X TO OS, C (T T V WERE A COUPLE OP SISSISS, ( 6'ffiRe
Tj
NUTTY, I BELIEVE YoO HAVE:
SOMEHWIMG HERE... IP IT PERFORMS
AS IT SHOULD, WE'LL PAVE
HISTO-DETECTORS IN EVERY
AMERICAN HOME
THE NEWF ANGLES
f ra..ir rr vvs thet city WOrVl rr tr looks ) vm gla you'll tc Vwhw power ) f u. cwj. that rcm. cctwc V " f ( WIND, YD LAKE TO TW-K 1 OWA.Y. OUTjCE f
roiEB'S IPEP. TBUY THET SHORE. ( A3 IF YOU WDNT I LMJGH1N' OUT COMPANY Z AoVWWIY-THEYLL KNOW THE Jg- I OVEO A.N IMPOHT MATTEQ, 1 TIME
VX,m IT TURNS OUT HE. VVJ DOES. WINDY LCTMe wy 'or THE OTHER r-f (mamEOTTHCTPOWED yfe CONCEQNINO THE LOCKW00D V.yooay
THE ONE WHO OWNEO IT, IT CONSTABLE BIT ON I OH IT, Slut. OF YOUB jrJ rl' V COMMkMV.. uawnv . -tKlA ' euraiCU VIMI .HIST BOUGHT" N n
TT ,
THE EVENING HERALD.
1 ylffifi2 ) f lk,ow Yf o.i I JIT
s L in - . . ' " " m I 0.uau' ucv ill " . i w.H I '
FRIENDS
MOM'N POP
DID IT COST S
f IS ' .. S
' P
KLAMATH FALLS. OREGON
WEU.YOU SEE, WE'RE K1NPA POOR
AND MOM HAS SOHTA BEEN HELP"
INC ME RAISE MONEY FOR PARTS..
LETS SEE-.VVE SOLD TWO HENS
FOR &3....I CLEANED UP SIX
LAWNS FOR 2.25 AND MOM
CLEANED A LADY'S HOUSE
FOR $4.35!!
THEM WE TOOK SOME OLD
FAMILY HEIRLOOMS TO A
DEALER AND COT 10.60
AND USED ALL THE MONEY
TO BUILD MY DETECTOR....
THAT MAKES
20.20!.'
w
rw I .
- si v y
17 OH.MOM....HOW MUCH
OH.YES.... SJ J DID THAT JUNK DEALER
THESE WAS Jl ALLOW YOU ON THAT t l
ONE OTHER J L OLO COSSET -jK fc
" f-n J iF" JXMs'ti-&uhWMM )
nanaat&MMaKBaaaW&fltBa.
February 20, 1934
By Martin
1 LOOK VYK Tr
By Blotter
By Cowan