The Evening herald. (Klamath Falls, Or.) 1906-1942, June 19, 1930, Page 6, Image 6

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    PAGE SIX
THE EVENING HERALD. KLAMATH FALLS. OREGON
Thursday, Juno 10, 1030
FARM NEWS
! Mayor Wattert TelUl"" t,kiut ,!
It? ! . n . roM
rrancmie oeneilll
LATEST NEWS)
OF MARKETS
rORTLAND. June 1 (AP)
Ecu nil liittrr irlcs rotusinrd
uii.-hantcwl today. Butter values
era talrly Htm, but mi quota
tion! looked weak under con-
'Inurd heavy ritlpt.
Ilovlewlnn the fruit and vece
ubla situation, the, Portland bu
ng ol the U. S. department ol
sgrltullura s&ys:
"Kim arrivals ot Oregon peas
t New York city met with vr
(uvorable response, and whole
salrs' wires Indicate that the
new Oregon pea crate la already
popular there Several shipper
are loading &reen peas today,
and the market is still very sat
isi'uctory, although a bit lower
than Ural (.Mptnenu realised.
Kirst loadings ot the populuT
telephone vnriely will start In a
lew days. Today's loadings sold
at about $3.25 per bushel rrate.
(. o. b. cost! Hack, (or No. 1
peas. Stork eradlnj St) per eut
No. 1 is discounted about lc per
pound.
"Outside demand tor straw
berries Is lighter, and prices
dropped to J 2-2 2 i per crate to
day.
"The lettuce market Is demor
alised at all western shipping
points. Portland retailers can
buy good local head lettuce at
la-10c per dosen.
"Cantaloupes and watermelons
are meeting with better demand.
after a tew days ot very cool
weather which always results in
alower movement of these com
modules. Cantaloupes are gen
erally of only fair quality.
"Oregon celery is more plenti
ful, and prices dropped yester
day (1.00-1.00 per crate."
CATTLE: 100, calves 15, slow,
auotably steady.
HOliS: Receipts 400, Includ
ing J 04 on contract: steady.
SHEEP: Receipts 1300, talk
ing around steady; lambs all
weights, common I4.o0-i.00.
Butter: Kalrly firm, un
changed.
Kgga: Look weak, unchanged.
Milk (butterfat), poultry,
country meats, onions, potatoes,
wool, nuts, hay, cascara bark
and hops steady and unchanged.
Sugar: Steady: (sacked basis)
cane, fruit or berry Si. 0 Per
rwt: beet sngar 14.70 cwt.
Flour: Steady: (city delivery
prices) family patents, 49s It. SO;
whole wheat, 49s 15.90; graham,
49s 3.70: bakers' hard wheat, J
98s Itj. 10: bakers' bluestem
16.60; pastry Hour,
HOW TO RAISE POULTRY
By Dr. U D. LeGear, V, S., St Louis, Mo.
Dr. LeGear ii fraduato of the Ontario Veterinary
College, 1892. Thirty-ais year of veterinary practice
on diseases of live stock and poultry. Eminent authority
on poultry and (tack railing. Nationally known poultry
breeder. Noted author and lecturer.
0 A Tfcfffc
I
ARTU LK XX.W1V
How About Unions
For Egg Producers?
Co-opera tlvo Market. n Which
Hm lru'rii vry tttcwiu.
lu Mmi j Other ltulnrse Hm
Many Ailvatitugnt to Oflcr
I'uultr) uit-tu
tdttora Not. Ttiia, la Dotbu
poultry raitiitf Mruitn 4y id !
known nmiuiiai uouurjr autaorUp
tr. U U LmLivl. i. bL Uu
1'ha Qtir fall! t.ppax la (Itla
twir. Our rvatleia r uKd o
rsid LbviQ carotuiiy and cilD to a
qui tot luiui rcivrabo.
patents, SSa
4H $6.30.
TENNANT
MRS. O. O. WIXGFIELD
TE.VNAXT. Calif.. June 19,
t Special I Complimenting Mrs.
Delia Goldman and Miss Ysabel
(Joldman of Vlsalia, Calif., Mrs.
It. B. Hawkins entertained at
bridge Monday afternoon. Three
tables of bridge were in play, and
at the close Mrs. O. O. Wingdeld
held high score and Mrs, L. A.
Boyes low. Mrs. Hawkins, assist
ed by her daughter Mies Harmony
Hawkins, served refreshments of
pineapple delight, cookies and cot
fee. Those woo enjoyed the af
ternoon were Mrs. Delia Goldman
and Miss Ysabel Goldman, honor
guests; Mesdames L. A. Boyes, O.
I.. Grimes, F. E. McLaughlin, H.
. Nesbitt, F. M. Filson, Dale Bee
son. C, A. Marshall, . B. Will
banks. Clay Parker and O. O.
."VVingfield.
The Tennant Lady Elks club
held their regular monthly busi
ness and social meeting Wednes
day afternoon with Mrs. Clay
Parker at her home on A street.
Eight membere were present, and
after the business of the club was
attended to, the ladies enjoyed a
few hands of bridge. The club
was pleated to have as visitors
Mrs. H. T. Doyle and her aunt
Mrs. Julia Croke. who is visiting
nere from san Francisco. Mrs.
Parker, assisted br Mrs. T. B.
Willbanks served refreshments at
the small tables. Those present
were Mrs. Julia Croke and Mrs.
H. T. Doylo. visitors, and Mes
dames M. niskin. R. B. Hawkins.
H. C. Nesbitt. E. D. McDonald,
Dale Beeaon, K. 1). Willbanks, O.
O. WInitfield and Clay Parker.
Mrs. Doll a Goldman and Miss
Yxiibel Goldman of Visalia, Calif.,
former school teacher of Tennant,
arrived in camp Sunday for a tew
lays visit with their many friends,
en route to Corvallls, Ore.
Mr. and Mrs. Jack Hall left
ftunday by auto for Woodland,
Calif. Mr. Hall will enter the
ellnic at Woodland, to be treated
for gall stones, from which lie has
been suffering.
Miss Carolyn Regar, one of the
high school teachers left Sunday
night for Berkeley, Calif., where
he will attend summer school.
Mies Ri'Kar was accompanied as
far as Rirhraond, Calif., hy Miss
Hazel McDonald, who will visit
relatives at Richmond.
Mrs. C. A. O'Connors and small
son Frank returned Monday from
a month's visit with Mrs. O'Con
nors' sistnr at Eureka, Calif.
Mr. and Mrs. Clnv Parker, Mr.
end Mrs. F. B. Willbanks . and
dnughter. Kathryn Marie, spent
Sunday nt Redding. Calif.
Mrs. O. O. Wlngfleld left Thurs
day morning for a two-week.'
vl-lt with relatives at Medford
and Grants Pas.
Mrs. F. M. Filson and Mrs. H.
C. Nesbltt motored to Dorris,
Calif., Tuesday on business.
rvnMV rAPTTRED
NEWPORT. Ore., June 1. fA
Leo Umatau. Sllets Indian,
who is said to have robbed the
nostoffir at fillets last inarch,
and later broke jail at Toledo,
was esptttred todsy by a deputy
sheriff after an exciting chase.
"e Results Is Herald Class Ada
Murk Twain ouce said ot the
weather, that everybody talk
about it but nobody doea any
thing about it. Much the same
thing might be said about co-op
erative marketing among poultry
raisers. To be sure, there arc
some co-operative organizations
now working succefsfuliy in sev
eral sections ot the country, not-
ably in California and some of
the central western states. The
"Co-ops" of Canada, too, otter
a notable example of what can
be accomplished. Taking the
whole situation' by and large,
however. It is almost literally
true that much haa been said
about co-operative markting,
out nine aone aoout it.
To be sure, it Is no simple
problem to get a thing ot this
kind started. That very fact
however, is a most excellent rea
son why something should be
started at once. Today, egg pro
ducers are in much the same po
sition as were the workers of a
few generations back. Without
organisation ot any kind, they
are at the mercy ot those to
whom they must sell. John Jones
with 10 or 12 doien eggs to sell
eacu week must take them to the
nearest market and accept the
price offered or tote them home
again. A well-organized associa
tion shipping carloads of eggs
each week suffers bo such disadvantages.
With sufficiently large quanti
ties to really mean something.
the association is In a position to
seek out the most favorable mar
kets, and can regulate shipments
into those markets in such a way
that a higher average level of
prices can be maintained than
would otherwise be possible. Col
lective bargaining, the factor that
has made possible the present
high wage levels tor workers. Is
also brought to the poultryman
through co-operative marketing.
Other advantages bo less im
portant, though Bot so often con
sidered, are the poas-uities ot
standardizing and improving pro
duction methods, standardizing
and improving the grade ot the
product and stabilizing produc
tion. It is a well-established
fact that in some sections of the
country only white eggs find a
ready sale at top pr!:es, while In
other sections brown eggs are the
favorites. Let us suppose that a
number of poultrymen whose
natural market is a brown egg
territory are producing only
white eggs. They know they are
not getting as good prices as
they should, but they do not
know why and have no way ot
finding out, as they operate in
dependently. As members ot an
effective association, they would
be given the necessary informa
tion or, if their total volume was
large enough, their separate lots
could be pooled into larger units
ana snipped economically into
some territory where they would
itna ready sale.
I cannot too strongly empha
size, however, the need for or
ganization In the poultry bnsi-
nevs. Labor is organised, and
look where wages are today. The
favorite
dessert
of
BUSY
WOMEN
m
JELL-WELL minf"Tess
work in the kitchen more
time for other things.
It's the modem deiint the
favorite everywhere winner of
Crand Prize at the Ezpotitioa
Internationale, Parit,
Accept bo subttituta,
well
teuse it Jills so WELL
fruit growers ot California or
ganised and boosted their profit,
millions ot dollars annually. The
walnut growers got togother-and
hell carloads where they once
hold bushels, and at higher profit,
too. The poultrymen of Cauada
formed an association and reai
ited 11 cents a dozen more for
their eitKs than they hud ever
been able to get before.
Here are just a few example
of what co-oiKr.,t)ve marketing
l.as done aud is doing lor those
tigaged In it. The poultrymou
ft this country must come to it
.ilso, sooner or later. If they aro
ever to realize the full profit that
is rlKhtlully theirs. This Is au
uko ot big business done in a big
uay and we who live in this age
must full in line or watch the
procession go marching ou to
success in which we cannot
t-hare. It you are not big enough
to get into the proceeslon stngle-
hsndd. you can combine you
resources with others like your
relt and all march together for
the common good.
1 do not mean to Imply thai
co-operative marketing is a kintc
cure-lt for every ill the poultry
business is afflicted with; neither
do 1 wish to give the impression
that a simple club of poultrymen
is enough. A co-operative asso
ciation must be a well-managed
commercial Institution. It must
be big enough to be truly repre
sentative of the territory in
which It operates. It must be
operated on the principle laid
down by the Three Musketeers
ot Dumas' famous story, "All for
one aud one for all." The pou
trymen must understand the
management's problems, aud the
management must understand
those ot the poultryman. There
must be harmony and concerted
action In every part, or the
whole thing will collapse ot lu
own wetc t.
The thing to do ia to study
such organizations as are already
successfully operating and adapt
to yonr own local ne-ds tne prin
ciples and practices they have
found successful. Shape a course
that you know you can depend
on to get you some place and
then stick to It, but make your
plans flexible enough to alio
for really necessary changes in
the future.
(Copyright, 1929,
by Dr. L. D. LeGear. V. g.)
W. D. Miller to Start
Airport Hangar Soon
Construction of the hangar at
the municipal airport will start
the first of next week, it was an
nounced last night by W. D. Mil
ler, who has been awarded the
contract. The building will cost
about 14. (24.(7, not including
painting and wiring.
According to terms of the eon-
tract it is to be completed within
45 days. The two runways will
be finished today, Mr. Miller Stat
ed.
Although the field is in condi
tion for the landing of planes, it
Is not being encouraged since a
number of hazards have not been
posted, G. A. Krause. chairman of
the chamber of commerce airport
committee, stated last night. Tha
committee also haa an oiling pro
gram to be carried out this sum
mer before the port will be ready
for permanent nxe.
PLANTING
POINTERS
Bearded Iris
lly 1. VICTOR 1.1'MSIIKV
llui-caii of riant Industry V S.
lh-partiiit'til of Agriculture
Ju:.t after the bearded iris has
bloomed Is the most satisfactory
time to divide rhizomes of this
plant. While many refer to these
rhlsomes as roots, they are really
uutlvrcround stems IhlckeuoJ and
modilied for food storage. I
The length ot time that such
plants can be left undivided, yet ,
have them produce satisfactory re-
suits, will depeud upon the growth :
that they make In auy given soil
and location. If they remain in
one spot over a period of years
with the care usually afforded,
they will eventually exhaust soil
and produce small blossoms aud
weak growth.
Nearly all bearded Iris grow i
with considerable vigor in favor
able environment, the rhlsomes
gradually spreading and forming
dense massos. Ono clump often
encroaches upon lla neighbor and
4 crowded condition results.
Work for Two I
If the clumps ot rhlsomes are
large, two persons working with
spades on oppostte sides ot the
plants can most effectively dig
them to prepare for dividing. j
After the soil haa been re-!
moved the clumps are separated
with a sharp knife so that each di
vision, with its attached fan- j
shaped mass ot foliage or dor- I
mant buds makes a new plant. At !
the time this work Is being done
Inspect (he roots and before re
planting out out any decay.
Shallow 1'lautlng Advised
riant the divisions in a soil
that has uot grown iris for a tew
years In order to get the best re
sults, lly so doing there is less
chance ot having the plants dam.
aged by peats. In replanting cut
aoom two-tnirds of the fau-shaped
mass oi milage from the division
in enter tnat tne rhisome msv a.
taniun use-it most satisfactorily. I
Place the division so that lla top
Is just exposed on the surface of
the soil. This Is ementlal, as all
bearded Iris prefer shallow nlaut.
uig in a weu-arained sou.
In regions where extremely dry
summers are the rule keep the
sou irotn drying out while the di
visions are becoming established,
A Use mulch Is beneficial.
Mayor T. B. Walters last night
addressed the Central Labor coun
cil relative to the resolution of
protest presented lo the clly coun
cil Monday night against the
granting ot a franchise to the
California Oregon rower com
pany. Nayor Walters explained that
the city was the one that opened
negotiations for the franchise and
not the power company. He also
stated that the city needa the
money which would he derived.
The mayor atated that the clly
1 H per cent of the
for the franchise,
or to allow the company (o keep
the present franchise.
The former resolution wss re
ferred . back to tho resolutions
i-otninlltse for re-dratllng. It was
re-wrltteu as endorsing tho olty
council In Ha aellou lo secure the
1 1 per rent tax as lung aa the
company did not capitalise on the
franchlae so that the city would
lie prevented or would have In
pay more It the systems were purchased.
Only one Connolly llrothera
slore after July 1st, at a 17 Main
street. t-Ilt
Committeeman Back
From Northern Trip
Arthur Rcliaiip, clly attorney
and stale central eominllteeiiiaii
from Klamath county for thu re
publican parly, returned yualor
ilsy with Mrs. ochaupp after a
visit In Knlerprlse, Joseph and at
Wallowa lake.
Mr, S.haupn atated yealorday
Dial lie had been In convsraatloii
Willi I'll II Metschan. slain reiuh
llrau oomniltlne chairman, hut
that aa yet no meeting of llm slale
ruinnilllee baa been culled lo so.
h'ct a party nominee for governor
to succeed the lata (leorge Joseph.
NORTHLAND
Transportation
Company
To all points S'orth
Last and West
For Convenience
Kc.oomy. 8a fet y aad
Dependability
"HIDE TUB NORTHLAND"
Phone 999
Terminal Stage
Depot
615 Main Street
Extension
Telephones
save step$l
NOBODY has yet
figured out exactly
what an Extension
Telephone saves in shoe leather.
But In nerves, tired limbs, and need
less steps it saves a whole lot more
than the few cents a day it costs!
You can place your order with
any telephone employee or just
call our Business Office and say
''I want an extension telephone".
The Pacific Tmrnotn a.xd Telegraph Comtamt
The
End
Is
Near
ACT
NOW!
Your Last Chance
To Take Advantage of Thi. Wonderful Offer
PRICE GOES UP JULY 1ST
Due to public demand we are forccil to extend this Great Range sc-Ilitt n
campaign for two weeks. The (leadline is drawing near act now ami (jel in on
this Great Offer and low payment plan. June JOtli is the last day for on July 1st
the price will be increased and the regular terms will be in effect.
This is your opportunity to jjet Automatic Electric Cookery in this beau
tiful all white enamel Ilotpoint Range. It is the newest model manufactured
and has been obtained for our customers EXCLUSIVELY. This range has been
priced at a most astotindingly low figure during this campaign,
ACT NOW, FOR ON JULY 1ST THIS GREAT OFFER WILL BE OVER,
REGULAR PRICES AND TERMS THEN WILL BE IN EFFECT
To give every customer
an opportunity to buy
this new range we have
arranged the easiest of
terms ONLY $10
DOWN AND $;.7S A
MONTI i WILL FUT
THIS NEW RANGE
IN YOUR HOME
fW
DOWN
COMPLETELY IN
STALLED. We were
fortunate to be able to
buy at a low figure
through a large quantity
purchase and are offer
ing our customers an
opportunity to save on
our good fortune.
TOT CALIFORNIA OREGON POWER COMPANT
Tsar Nrtjsn fJ" to srssraaa-
Mom'ti Pop
On the hy f its Ma.riNNCGfcN. wc Am not
QUICK y GEC. POP, COME 1. AKV MtCK ,! VHkmM' IKIEStSTeU
SCI-SWAy to THE WINDOW t S THINGS UP LIKE MWS.3NO0P Wl CAM BE
nTScal QUICK1. HC COIN' ) ( dt ) HC OOts WHEN 'A THE OCflCIM.
SLSIk IT MWNl! L V ) HI.GET5 50WE.I S 0B3CVt FOR
Finnegan Blows Up Again
By Gowan
p WA RGHT UP
U utiirtiri' iu run winy ml
Kirm I rsj MLFtUl
tOP.MfcKe MIS
UUT UP M4D
get wy rwon
tut WINDOW.
CVCRXBODV CAM
ee new uvtctima
V.OOK
wescotw I i ,X
rooopvwusc.cee,! ' n
MC WAV IN J TTV '
llzV tO 1 sTY WC HTWysCI, IWC. V- -tf . orrj
Freckles and His Friends
Eagle Eye!
Que AIR,
SQUADQO) uao
LANDED ALMOST
WIWM A STowfc'S
mom op
FCtCW.CS AND
"rue iurcc
P1UJTS.T& JO!0
A BADSbGNV.-
AS IT CLEARED
OP.TUEV Took
OFPONWToBS
DlSCCMEQSD 87
FRECKLES AND
TUG INOIAM
6Cr SCLERAL,
fWMOTCS TOO
LATE C
T&OSU
LUCK!.'
By Blosser
VS-Hy
t-9
u. ' " w-THATSA I ft
V 1 S. l 00 SOMSIUINS L-"
TOOT
hi
V4UAT S CLANCt TUONINS
BACU Fob? US UtADlM'
foa THAT FLAT 6B3T
A6AiM-"M0P MS
AIN'T UMIIM'
TROVBlS I!
r
Mass suv nrr.
0iosiw,K.z iwe.
TICK'S NO WAN
LWINCs II1H
BtTTEtt EVES "WM
CLANcy- THAT'S
uv "msv call
UIM EACLS EVE!
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