Lake County examiner. (Lakeview, Lake County, Or.) 1880-1915, February 19, 1914, Image 1

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    HAS THE CIRCULATION-
-PRINTS THE NEWS-
REACHES THE WRLE
THE EXAMINER IS THE OFFICIAL PAPER OF LAKE 0QOUNTY
VOL. XXXV.
LAKEVIEW, LAKE COUNTY, OREGON, FEBRUARY 19, 1914.
NO. &
WILL DEVELOP
BIG PROJECT
V. II. MrKKNDHEH AND II. J. MAR
TIN AUK INTERESTED
IS SCHEME
100,000 H. P. AVAILABLE
Loral Man Hm Feasible FIn to
Irodure Knoraioua Electric l'uw
er From Fall River,
California
C. II. McKendree returned home
the flrst of the week from a business
trip to various points In California
od Kansas City, Mo. Mr. McKen
dree went to the lutter place to In
terest It. J. Martin, of the Goose
Lake Valley Irrigation Co., In a
water power project In Khustu Co.,
Cat. lie states that IiIh trip was re
warded with success, and Unit ii.
nold a one-half Interest In th pro
ject to Mr. Martin, who will llnuiit'e
the undertaking.
The power hH Ih atluutcd on Kail
Itlver, near Kail City. Smith Kinory
tic Company of Sun Francisco huv.
been engaged nH engineer, unit H e
final survey has been accepted by the
State Water CotninlHtilon of Califor
nia, and the filial pormitH will he
Issued at a public hearing to he hold
at Han Francisco In nbout two wtiek.
at which Mr. MrKendree will bo pre
sent. The engineers have etttlmuti d tha
the project Ih the moat feoslble ur!
capable of developing power nt a less
cost than tiny In the slate of Califor
nia. Mr. MiKcndree Htatcs they lire
anil! red of Icing able to deliver the
power In Han Francisco, including
tratiHiulHHlon cohIs, at $60 per horse
power which Ih far below what Ih bc
liiK done ut the present time.
Nature litis made a natural loop
In the river, and by constructing a
tunnel through a mountain whora
the two streams, an It were, are near
eat a natural fall of 600 feet la mad .
The tunnel will be about two nillea
to length, and front this a capacity
of 100.000 horn power will be se
cured. Tho river rises from sprlngn
reaembllug quite similar in naturo
to that of Ana Ulver in Summer
Lake Valley, Lake County. The
supply of Fall Itlver is said to jo
steady and Inexhaustible.
With this amount of horse power
obtainable a very largo bonding Ihhuo
Coti'lniied on pnge eight
GOOD PRICE OFFERED
UTAH WOOL IS SURE TO BRIMi
high prices
Reported that Eastern lIuyerM Hnvo
Ottered 1 1 4 Cents in
That Htale
Halt Luko City, Feb. M. East
ern wool-buyers today offered 14?i
cents a pound for large quantities
of the Utah clip, according to C. 13.
Stewart, secretary of the Utah Wool
Growers' Association. This is a half
cent higher than any price offereJ
for Utah wool prior to today.
"Indications ure," said Mr. Sto
wart, "that tho record price for our
nativo clip will bo reached this
year. Tho highest figure last year
wus 17 cents a pound.
W. S. McClure, secretary of tho
National Woolgrowors' Association,
said today ho had boon advised by
cablegram that tho entire domestk
clip of Kngland lias boon disposed of
and that the wool market of Enr
land and Europe Is experiencing an
unprocedented shortage. Tho gener
al outlook for the Amorlcan Worn
growers baa cover been better, said
Mr. McClure.
Must Im Registered
Erroneous reports have been cir
culated regarding tha qualifications
of signer of candidates' potltlons,
Secretary Olcott has announced. He
says tho law made It clear they must
be registered voters of the party
with which the candidate are affili
ated. It I further required that the
signer mutt . be registered for the
election when votes are to be cast
for the candidates, or, in the case of
the election next November, must
have registered after the first Mon
day In January thl year.
Signers of petition to initiate and
re for measure must not necessarily
be registered voters but they must
be legal voters, as provided by law.
I toads 11111 Parsed
The Shacklnford good roads bt'l
passed tha House by a vote of 282 to
42. This bill provides for distribu
tion of f2C,000,000 by the Federal
Government for good roads among
the various States of the Union. The
conditions on which a State can get
a share of this money Is that it
provide a dolar for every dollar
spent by the Federal Government.
It will go to the Senate Immediately
for action there.
TIME TO GET BUSy
TIME LIMITED TO I II.K INCOME
TAX STATEMENT
Collector Miller Call Attention t
Numerous llejulr iiienlx of
till .New Imw
The Examiner has been requested
by Milton A. Miller, Collector Inter
nal Revenue, to publish the follow
ing concerning the income tax law:
Only a few days left in which u
file your Income tux statement.
Applications for blanks can be
made to any bank or County Trea
surer or to Milton A. Miller, Collec
tor Internal Revenue, Porthinu.
Oregon.
Penalty of $20 to $1000 for fail
ure to file returns on or before
March 1st.
Fine not exceeding $2000 or 1m
prlHonment not exceeding one year
or both at the discretion of the court
for making a false or fraudulent re
turn. Every person having a net Income
of $3000 or over for calendar year
($2600 for year 1913) must make a
return; a single person is allowed rr
exemption of $3000 and a married
person $4000. (For year 1913,
March 1 to December 31, the exemp
tion allowed is $2500 or $333.33.
All payments due on your income
may bo remitted ut once or you can
have until June 30 In which to pay.
Payment muBt bo made by certified
check, money order or draft. Per
sonal checks can not be accepted.
Partnerships uh such oh are not
required to make income returns,
but the members comprising the firm
providing their Individual Incomes
reach $3000 f'J500 for 1913) oi
over are to make returns.
If in doubt regarding any part of
the law or regulations write for In
formation to M. A. Miller, Collector.
Portland, Oregon
For the year 11113, the luw oper
ates only from March 1 to December
31 so the Incomes, deductions and
exemptions are figured accordingly.
Highway Contract Iet
The contract for tho construction
of the Wnsco-Blggs branch of tho
state highway was signed at Saloni
luHt week by tho highway commis
sion and Akoson & Dloomqulst, the
low bidders. They expect to employ
800 to 400 men.
Tho low bid was $32,000, but tin
highway commission announced that
some of the work would be reduced
so bb to bring the expenditure within
$30,000, tho amount allotted for thin
branch. The contract was lot at this
time upon tho recommendation of
the Oovernor ns a relief measure for
the unemployed situation in thlt
state.
President Signs Hill
President Woodrow Wilson last
week signed the bill permitting the
construction of a bridge across the
Columbia River between Vancoii.-er
and Tortand.
CONGRESS A
BIG SUCCESS
FEDERAL All! IH PLAN OF IRRI
GATORS AT THIRD ANNUAL
MEETING
RESOLUTIONS ADOPTED
W. lalr Thompson of Lakevlew
Wh Elected Third Vlce-Prewl-dent
Many Developments
re Planned
The third annual Irrigation Con
gress which was held in Portland
Feb. 1 and 14, was pronounced the
most successful yet held In the state!
W. Lair Thompson and G. W. Hlce of
the Goose Lake Valley Irrigation Co
were delegates from this place.
Tho principal recommendations ii;
resolution" adopted were:
State to adopt "some comprehen
sive reclamation policy," constitu
tional amendment providing bond
Issue Ih Indorsed and Federal co
operation Is recommended.
Federal Government to construct
Tutnalo extension In Central Oregon.
DeHert Lund Board not to issue
certificate of proofs to settlers un
til one-half of land under contract
has been cultivated.
Federal Reclamation Service to
take up Malheur and Owyhee pro
jects in Eastern Oregon.
That JYi.hute8 Valley Irrigation
project now under Joint State and
Continued on page eight
MORE AMENDMENTS
THIRTEEN PROPOSED CHANGES
l OREGON CONSTITUTION
Women' league and Socialists In
itiate Measures to Limit Time
of Work
Oregon citizens will vote upon 11
constitutional amendments and laws
proposed by the last Legislature, and
two and probably more to be submit
ted upon petition at the general elec
tion this year. Petitions for the ini
tiation o' a state-wide eight-hour
luw, proposed by Socialists, provided
for an amendment of sec. 0, article
15. of the constitution, and for the
women's eight-hour law, proposed by
the Women's Eight-Hour Leugue.
have been filed with tho Secretary o
Stale, ami all requirements for buy
ing the titles of the measures on tin.'
ballots have been met
W. S. U'Ron Is having petition.!
circulated for initiating a measure
providliig for an amendment to the
constitution to give $1500 tax ex
emption on homes, livestock, tools,
etc., end II. D. Wnguon has submit
ted a form of petition to the Secre
tary of State for an amendment pro
viding for a sur-tnx for raising re
venue to defray the expenses of the
Istato for each fiscal year. It would
assess persons owning laud and na-
jtural resources, levying 60 cents ui
eucli $100 above $26,000 assessed
valuation, $1 on each $100 abovo
$60,000 assessed valuation, $2 on
each $100 above $75,000 and $3 on
each $100 above $100,000.
C. S. Jackson, of Portland, has pro
posed a measure for Initiation at the
coming election, an amendment to
section 18, article 1, of the constitu
tion, providing that compensation
for land taken for public use shall
not be at a rate more than double
the average yearly i9ses9metit of t'.st
property for taxation during the
three assess m out years next before
the assessment year in khlch the ac
tion is brought to condemn the prc
perty. Continued
FRAIL BUYS
A 1913 CLIP
IT IS UNDER8TX)D THAT 8. P.
MOSS WOOL imOUGHT
12 K CENTS
MORE 1913 WOOL UNSOLD
Local Sheepmen Show no Willingness
to Contract this Year's Crop
Walter Sherlock Offered
IS Cent
The wool situation remains bright
and there seems to be no reason why
prices should not be fully equal to
those of a year ago. During the past
week J. Frankl bought S. P. Moss'
1913 clip, consisting of 30,000 lbs.,
paying therefor In the neighborhood
of 12 Mi cents. The exact figures
lies not been made public, but it has
been stated on good authority that
tho price was less than 13 cents,
leading one to believe that It was the
figure state above. There are a few
small lots of the '13 clip remaining
unsold, while the T. C. Flynn clip of
about 60,000 is also unsold. Mr.
Flynn died a few weeks ago, and his
brother John, who was associated
with htm in the sheep business has
not yet got matters in shape bo that
he can dispose of the wool.
It seems that none of the local
sheepmen are willing to contract
I their w.jol at this time, regardless of
Continued on pace eight
REGISTRATION SLOW
ONLY 173 REGISTH ATIONS IN
ENTIRE COUNTY
Republicans Thus Far Have Strong
Iead Over all Other Candidates
Registered
When registration closed yester
day noon at the Clerk's office 173
voters In the entire county had quali
fied for the primaries. This is only
a starter for the- number of vter
to register in Lake County in on!r
to qualify before the books are Ins
ert May 1. Since women have I ecu
granted the right to vote it is esti
mated that there will be about 1S00
voters in the county this year.
So far the Republican part ! Id:
a lead of about two to one over ipl
other parties yet registered.
Following is a list of voters reg
istered and their party affiliations
from the different precincts over The
county from which returns hmo Uei.
made, up to yesterday noon:
Precinct Rep. Dem. Prog. Soc.
Silver Lake. . . .18 4
Summer Lake ... 1 .... 4
Puislcy ... 1 4
Crooked Creek . . 1
South Warner.. 1 2 1
North Lakevlew. 9 2 2
South Lakevlew23. . .21 3 1
Drews Valley. . .4 1
Goose Lake .... 6 .... 3
Cogswell Creek .4 3
Thomas Creek . . 1
Lake 4
Ft. Rock 22.... 6 15
New Pine Creek, 1
Fort Rock has four registrations
with no party specified, and South
Warner and North Lakevlew has one
registration each on Independent
ticket.
According to a statement tbsued
by Secretary of State Olcctt the to
tal registration in the state up to
Feb. 14 was 1'6,945. Of this number
16,74 8 are Republicans, 6,645 Dem
ocrats, 1,007 Progressives, 779 Pro
hibitionists, ft'! Socialists and 1,1 H
inlseellttno.aj
To Relieve Mall Carriers
Congressman Raker, of California,
has taken up with the Fostofflce De
partment the matter of an increased
allowance for carrying mall on stage,
routes, due to the additional tonnage
caused by the parcel post. He was
assured by the Postmaster General
that the department is making every
effort to make proper provision fo
the relief of contractors. Malls have
been already weighed three times for
adjustment of the Increase In the
weight of parcel post packages from
11 to 20 pounds and another weigh
ing is now In operation on account
of the Increase from 20 to 60
pounds. Contractors will be allowed
additional compensation according!.
Wm. Harvey Badly Injured
The Merrill Record of last week
stated that Wm. Harvey, the Lake
County horseman, was thrown from
a horse on Monday by an accident tc
his saddle and was severely Injured.
He was carried to the Riverside from
the Park Stables, where the accident
happened, and put to bed. During
Monday night a telegram was aent
to Berkeley for Mrs. Harvey to come
to Merrill, and yesterday she arrived
to nurse her husband.
NEVADA WOOL SOLD
PRODUCT BRINGS FROM 12 TO
13 H CENTS
Estimate'. Three Million Pounds of
Nevada Clip is Sold
to Date
Wool buying in Nevada is now in
full swing and to date It Is estimat
ed that over three million pounds of
this years clip has been contracted
for, says the 'Journal. The prices
being paid range from 12 to 13
cenU p?r rtuud. -
Wool buyers have been in the field
for the past ten days, setting a re
cord for early activity and it is esti
mated that about half of the 1914!
clip has been purchased to date. Lo
cal sheep men are of the opinion that
the entire clip will be sold before the
expiration of this month, excepting i
those who will hold their wool in
warehouses until a later date, tak
ing a chance in securing a higher
price. This practice Is followed bv
sheepmen who own their own ware
houses.
"The wet winter in Nevada a:i
sures a good grade of wool," explair
ed a wool expert recently, "and Ne
vada wool is in demand. Transac
tions are being recorded dally and
the top price paid to date is thir
teen and one-half cents. Twelve
cents was offered at the start, but
this price did not prevail for long.
o -
Feruley-Lassen Extending
The Reno papers report that the
Southern Pacific frack from Lassen
to Westwood. Cal., Is being rushed.
It Is expected that the laying of rails
will be completed by the last of this
month.
Westwood is situated about 29
miles from Susanville and is in a
timber country. Preparations aro
underway for the shipment of tim
ber and lumber from that section as
soon as the railroad facilities wilt
permit.
n
U'Ren Independent
Declaring that the standpatter
and reactionaries in the Republican
Party are anxious to put the knif
Into him, W. S. U'Ren has changed
his mind about seeking the Republi
can nomination for Governor, and
will be an Independent candidate.
U'Ren has worried some of the Re
publican leaders, for they feared
that he might receive the party nom
ination because there are so many
candidates in the field that he might
slip in.
-- o
Money for Roads
A dispatch from Washington un
der date of Feb. 13, states that the
Forestry Service in making appor
tionment of the 10 per cent forest
fuud for 1914. has made allotments
for various road projects In Oregon
The Fremont Forest will receive
$1,321.50 for the Paisley, Chewau
can, Drews Creek and Beecraft
ranch roads.
2 MORE JOBS
ARE CREATED
C. H. EVANS MADE STATE GAME
WARDEN AT SALEM
MEETING
FINLEY, CLANTON SHIFTED
Ex-Mjwters at Two Departments Alio
Get Redactions In Salaries
Governor Has a Hand
In Changes
More money for salaries was mado
necessary .'by the State Game and
Fish Commission at a meeting be
hind closed doors at Salem last week
at which the two departments were
virtually reorganized.
Appointment of their own depu
ties by the newly named Master Fish
Warden Clanton were appointed at
reduced salaries. were created,
while C. II. Evans, member of the
Commission, was made State Game
Warden and Theodore Opsund, clerk
of the Commission, was appointed
Master Fish Warden.
The increase in aggregate salaries
Is $1000 a year.
Mr. Finley was appointed ouperin
tendent of the educational and biolo
gical department and R. E. Clanton
will be superintendent of hatcheries
Both positions were created at the
meotij . The salary of each will be
$2400 h year. Their salaries as
Master Wardens were $3100 each.
State Can. Yardi E.'Uns and
Master Fish Warden Opsund will re
ceive salaries of $2100 a year.
Before the meeting the Governor
sent the Commission a letter recom
mending an annual saving over the
expenditures of last year $37,500
and during the meeting he accepted
the resignation of C. H. Evans, as a
Commissioner, so he could be ap
pointed Game Warden.
Announcement was made that the
new Game Warden and the new Mas
ter Fish Warden would employ all
field men, which constitute the lar
ger part of the employes.
The plan considered at a former
meeting to divide the state into four
districts was not adopted, although
the Game and . Fish Wardens were
informed they could do what they
liked.
It .also was announced that the
suggestion et Governor West that
Continued on page eigh
INCORPORATE FARM
MANY IMPROVEMENTS PLANNED
FOR MODOC PROPERTY
Range Catte HoU to J. C. Hotchkiss
Preparatory to Buying Blooded
Dairy Stock
George C. Paonessa, one of tlu
principal owners of the John Bower;,
ranch at Joseph Creek, Modoc Co.,
Cal., while here last week sold 210
range cattle from the ranch to J. C.
Hotchkiss of thlB place, at a price oi'
$8,700. The stock was sold through
the firm of Curtis & Utley of Lake
view. The property was recently incor
porated and will be known under the
name of Joseph Creek Dairy Com
pany, dairying to be the chief indus
try pursued. The ranch will be
stocked with a pure strain of dairy
cattle and O. I. C. hogs. All the old
buildings are to be replaced with
new structures appropriate to the de
velopment of the property, and a
new water power plant and creamery
are among the Improvements plann
ed for the near future.
One thousand acres of the farm
will be put under cultivation this
year.
I