Lake County examiner. (Lakeview, Lake County, Or.) 1880-1915, December 05, 1907, Image 1

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    1
A
MMP
mmitm
V( H . XXVIII.
LAKKVIKW, LA K 10 COUNTY", OliKdON, TIITUM) A V. I)K( KMIiKIt . I'M?.
NO. 40
REHABT WRITES
FROM MEW YORK
Some tiling Impress Mini
hi c I:iiroutc.
MEET FAlrl LADY 04 hi MAIN
WnUltra lialnmc Water t-ngine
While Uuiuiing nt l ull ipeed
And I'lsh I Mini 5ca.
New Y.n k Cily. N. V.,
Kditi.r I . mi hi 1 1 n-1 ,
I .like V ll-W , ll I . nil :
I'li'ti'ii' lot Mill. I my K.Mimluer. I
lin ii I !' ii I hlrl y hi vi n ihiyn coming
from l.iikivii'W In New Yolk Cil',
htoppiug nl Ki'Mn, Sun I-'ra n f I m-ci, Los
Ani li'", .loplm iiml Ann in, Mo., iiml
rt Chicago
l-'iuip imlifi m t r 1 1 1 k' i n ri fiiiiiM t
Inn. Ii- 1 1 1 mi tux on I in- tii. While
cri'd-llltf It lin k (if I l. Nlllloll SCH I
mtw the pie-Mcngerit II -1 1 1 1 1 ' Irnm tin
trui II while it WIIH 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 k." . mi. I If good
tlllit llll'l been IIMKll, they tM.lllil llllVH
caught mime Huh. We tinccfl Hi in
Ucck 1 1 1 ill it trer-tlc. '1 In- Iiiiiii flowed
I i m 1 1 iiml tin .nni-i-ii t''i begun I brow
ing bread into tin unti l, mul halting
limikii will. bread mul thii.wiug them
out. Mnl'i' IIkIi riiliii' In tln top of
I till W liter I hull I (Ml SHU, W hell till
bread wait ttiowu nut, making I liu
water iilmimt I lurk uIIIiIIk ui I'weu
ty llvn nr tlmty llr-h u I j t long could
ln seen nt ii ti:m nil I In way m-riiMH
I In- neck, it illntitiH-i t.t m rtul hundred
ynttN.
When my train mi'. ; . -ii i i ; : u Chicago
h linly I'liinii nml hiiI nl. ih'miIc i.l mi-.
Apparently Interfiled In it gune til
-itr.l it - t-iil I in it 1 1 and ii j'nclf were
playing. Slu- wtiN it total stranger to
Till', llllt htlO refilled idU'l.tlj' III - 1 1 1 it i ti t -
ml witn my ti'iniii-tit Slmiily iitti-r
mIih 1-It I ihihmmI my f 1 1 r r- containing
J t . "J : and to tell IIik lr,.:i' in ten
yet.
Tlii'ii while at Cliii-iii-n, I caught thi
Mit n ilu Itt'li, mhiicI Mug to it'iiii-iiilit-r,
for it while, even if it i:is only t-kiu
Ji-i-i.
While going from Chicigu to New
York on I lit I.iikhliui ini ! N. V.
Central, hiiw IIihiii ant. 'i' I in. engine
Wit tlllllt Mopping tin- . . - 1 1 in tln
train in tlm lc ust. Tliry h.t i- it I rough
full of witter bc'wecn tlm rails, on m
level willi tlm lli'H, mul wild h scoop
tiinli-r tlm engine li-t ilowti into the
trough while pushing over the name,
miction iloi-n I Iih ri-i-t of the work, The
trough in hlioiit t wo nml u lift If feet
wide, and probably h quarter of a mile
long, nml Hi" water in it I heated lit
all time These watering trough are
. lured along IIii triu'k Ii limit thirty
inlli-H Mnrt upon lioth tru-kii, thin
1 1 fin lu-inu diiiilili- Iriu-kml Nil tlm way,
him! (our lrn 'kit purt of tlm wiiy.
H. V. UKIIAHT.
HonriiiK Ordered.
Thi' Imi'l I'lliri' ollli'liiln Inivn onler
I'd In lit liiyn in I lin following CHHnH,
wln-ri nil or pint ! trnrtH nr Infolvod
in t ln np iinil iniiH of 1 iffi-rfot jir'
noun :
1 In- t-iiM' i-l I.-1. Liikr, John AdhcII,
llitilli-l . Iiiln. "ii, IiiiiiichIcii J Mlll-
caul h, I. I 'ii-i lin-r, liiiini-iitiinil ap
pliritnt, In , n nit' m il ri-I lor .laiiiiary
l.'i, CM IH. 1 1 .-!. I I . n H (Dim) iih follows:
M, Cnhi'ln-1-r, lloini'-ti-iiil nitry, for
tln cunt Ii hull ol in. i tli liulf. (, .'Ml, T.
:n, n. n. ti i - i ni t Ht t :.", . m.
Mil. I.nki-, homi-hti ii.l i ntiy, for tho
Hoiith half ni'll'i Imlt, hiiine Hcctioti,
llli-il Ot-t. 'js, !rti; at 1" :-'7 a. m. John
Aiihi-II, homi i-ti ml i-ntiy, lor t e north-wi-hI
ipiiutri Kiimi- ci i t ion, lllfd l)c.t.
ilM, r.i7, at IJ.M, p in.; Dmiii'l John
null, ImiiHhti ml till I y for tlm nortll
wort ipi.tlti r fiiiui' Ht-tiiiii, flli-i Oct. 'JH
UNIT, at I :U7, p. in. ;
Tlm 'HMi' of Juiiii'H Mi'Shmii, Tmlwr
mid Stout api'lii-iiiil, fi r tlm noiitu
wi'ct ipmrt'T m i-. II. T. IW, 1 17, Mld
Oi l. r'7, at .: i:t, u. m. ; vn. Ru
pert C Hall, hoini-hti-nd t-ut ry, lor tho
lioit half emit I liulf. Muni' i i liiiu. III
I Nov. JM, 1'7 lli'iirinu ordt-rt-d
for January n, r.NW
'I lin i'iihk ot lid I.uki', Iii-iiii'kIi'IiiI np-plu-mit,
A. L l'oor. Ii-itm ;-trii.l appli-i-itut,
Jthhi ('. Aiim II, liomi-ntt ml ap li-i-uiit,
K. Win. II. ( ';ihi-I i-i-r, houixliail
npplii-iiiit, lieu r 1 1 1 1' i-it lor J it 1 1 1 1 it r y H,
V.xih. Applu-iit iuiiH Ii lei in fnllouM:
Win. II. I'axt-lii't-t , htiii:i'ht-ad entry,
f ir thi not t hi-iu-t i.uat l r .'di. T. 'XI, K.,
U. It, i:., Illid Oft. "H, T.HI7 at !l:,
a. in. ; 1-1. I .tike, liumiftt hI entry, lor
tlx! Houtli half nortli hull, Mtti.o m-c-
jtioii, lllo I Ort. JH.P.HI7, at ll:7. a. in.
IJenel5, Aiihi-II, iHimchti'iid entry, for
! ".P llOrtlll'Hst M'Mltcr, fWIIIC Iktl y,
i llii'd iVf. -j, i:hj7.
! The rune of (ieo. S. Ilurpei, tinilxsr
1 nii'l etoiie Mppln-niit, b. T. M Mur
phy, hoiiifrtiit'I ii I'licittit, heuriuK act
lor Jiiiiuaiy Ii, llHi.i. A pplh uc ioim filed
iih followH :
Jen. S. Ilaipi-r, tiiuluT and ntone
itpplif nit, lor I In I'ltht half HiiiitheHHt
iinuti-r mi',. :ti, T. :u, s , K. l.", K.,
llli-il lift. l'.n'7. nl a. in. ; T.
I-). Murphy, liiitnrlcii l entry, for name
iiiu t, liii-d ot t. -j"; i : h t, at rj:, p.
SURVEYS ARE
ALL COMPLETE.
Railroad Routes From North and West are
Completed to Lakeview.
The three railroad iiirvey ln crews
that have hei n wmkuiK iu this vicin
ity all BiiiiiiniT, itlxty men In all,
came Into town the flmt of tho week
and were iliMcliarod from further du
ty in thin t-r-iory, all excepting the
otllfe force, wli't'h will remain lipre.
The routen are all run out. Home of
the men itat tied for-Halt Lako Tueit
day, where lin y ciune from nearly a
year ago, during which time they have
run a uurvey from liuriiM to Lakeview
aod one from Merrill to Lakeview.
Home of the lmyn Mcatlored out and
will remain in thin i-iction of the
country.
Tlitie now remaiiiH uotliiug for the
railioad company lo do hut comii elice
cotict ruction work on the new route.
TIih line from the north leaven the
Oregon Lio-tern in the vicinity of
Wagotitiru .Mountain, lu thin county,
and rniiH hoiiIIi through ChriMtmag
Lake, nklrtu the Kummer Lake and
Chewuucuii vnlli j-H, and comes down
Crooked Creek valley to Lakeview.
This roiitj' extendii Mouth of lakeview
and what tonnectiona it makes ao'ith
is not know n. The other line cone i
from the went, ntarting either at Mer
rill or Klamath Falls. It takes a moHt
direct route to Lateviaw, pastiingj
lioiiHiiza, runs through the Harnett 1
valley and Drews valley country, ;
t-oiiien dow n Drew a creek, through the
Went Hide nettlement and across the ;
valley near the bead of the lake, and
internect the line from the north at
the lo er edge of town.
We have the mirvey now, and the
road will he the next ohject of inter ;
ei-t. When it will come cannot he
kimiMi. Only for the fact that coti
1 it ioiiM ore ripe for an immenHtdy pro
ductile lli-ld to he lapped it might he
aome time hefore we could expect to :
Hi-e the road huilt. The various re
honrci-ti of this country, conaiuting of '
grams, fruitu, mineral and timber all !
demanil tin importation facilities, and'
t here iH nothing to cause the company 1
to d'-lay the building of theue roada. 1
Unit (lie iron hone will be snorting'
through Lakevibw- within two years j
in expected hy those who keep posted
1
i
Lf
VvisA.i-
SENATOR HENRY A. DU PONT.
The government's hill ngiilimt the combination termed the powder trust
Mines aa one of tho (li fe iidantK Senator Henry A. lu l'ont of Delaware, a
member of the fumoua family of powder makers which for morn than a cen
tury baa furulshed high explosives to tho government. Senator Du Pont waa
chosen one of the mi'inhers from Pulawnro In the upper branch of congreaa
lifter a long and memorable contest, and when bo entered the sonata laat year
It waa announced thai ho bad withdrawn, from uctlve participation In the
powder business. He in no longer president of the corporation which exerclaea
dominant Influence In the affairs of the powder combination, but it Is
Charged by tho government that he la still one of Its principal atockholden.
Senator Du l'ont was bom In 1838 and la a great grandsou of Tlerr Samuel
Du l'ont da Nemoura, the French economist and statesman who' founded taa
American branch of the Du Font family, The senator graduated from West
fotnt In 1861 at the head of bla claaa aud inada a remarkable record ft
bravery In the civil war.
Our Attitude Toward Indian
By I H A NCI I . LLL'PP. United Sutra Commniiotitr of Indian Affiln.
HE ATTITUDE OF THE GOVERNMENT TOWARD THE
A M ERICA N INDIAN IS NO LONGER ONE OF PATERNAL
ISM. IT IS SEEKING TO PLACE THE INDIAN IN A PO
SITION WHERE HE CAN EECOME A CITIZEN, A
WORKER.
JVc-Mi nt II'H.Mvelt li:n nia" a lniiMiiily of t lie Indian question,
ami it l. .-u 1.1m ..iuioii that TllE INDIANS HAVE IlK
C'KIVKI) '1UO .Ml.'Cll NUKrilXC. Tluy l.ave been herded into
corrals, so to ija-ak, and mu d in reservutioiis ; liavc been fed and
elttlicd at cnuiK nt xjn n.se. That such action was necessary in the
e;.!V jiionccr days there is no doubt. Tixhiy this seenu no longer
neeesary.
t p: r.
In round number.-: there are 100,000 Indians in the United States
at the present lime. We have about ,',i'00 agents and representatives
looking after them. I! degrees we are felecting Indians for INDE
PENDENT mi tliods of living. We say to them: "Here is a plot of
ground. lb-re are garden seed-, implements and supplies. On your
own exertions will depend 011r future."
This etab!i.-hes a 1 hild of nature as a tiller of the soil. An Indian
makes one t.f the l!KST of laborers. The rail
road-; (..11 te;:iv to 1 1 i;tt fact. Hut take a white
l:.:..n ;.M I :mv.' I '::, ;,!1 l e m e !,. HOW MANY
OF Til KM Wol'l.l) WOKw 1 1 A 1 1 1 ) IV SOME
ONE WAS PKOVIDINC. I'OK THEM? This
i-; the jinsitiiiu (' the linliav.. We have eared for
him and pr-iicb d him and allowed him to depend
tui the agent 1'nr practically everything he needed.
This plan is being done away with. It will be a
CilIADl'AI. process. It will nut be done in this year or the next.
Hut the policy is being consistently followed out, and the list of abso
lutely dependent Indians is being decreased every year.
And the work is being done systematically. A WATCH IS
EXERCISED OVEU A LI, OF OUH WAKDS. When one is
found sufficiently advanced to look after himself, he is expected to
do ao.
WE WANT TO MAKE THE WAY EASY FOR THE INDIAN.
HELP HIM TO ASSERT HIS MANHOOD; HELP HIM TO BECOME AN
AMERICAN CITIZEN. MANY UNDERESTIMATE THE ABILITY AND
POWER OF DEVELOPMENT INHERENT IN AN INDIAN. ALL HE
NEEDS IS A CHANCr
I' '! ;'i,'l made 1 .1, proven.. , 1 4 t.n th
tt rt 1 m le. on July .'in. i.U!.
1 (filling was ordered t.. le held on
lib. 1, l!M)7t before (icon..- CliH-tain.
c 'iinly clerk of Klamath county, and
on I'eh Ii, the testimony wan filed oil
which the ICegi.-ter held thai tlie home
plead ap plication of Dunlap should be
rejected.
On the contrmy. the Itn-eiver held
that Ibe homestead settler lia.i acted in
entire pood faith t.n bis rettlement,
and be lecomniended thet the home
stead entry be allowed to go of re
coni, and the limber and xtoue apfili
cation be rejected, from which the
limber and stone applicant, by his
attorney, filed hi appeal.
A careful examination of the tenti
mony sati-fles me that the land invol
ved is chiefly valuable for its timber
and practically unfit for cultivation
arid raising of crops. ! is therefore
such luud ai may be enltred under
the laws which provides for the entry
of hiicIi lauds. The law, however,
provide- that lands cantot be taken
uuedei the T. and S. act bich are oc
cupied at the time of application and
that appears to he the main question
involved. It appears that at one time
previous to th transactions herein,
to wit. Jan. 2H, 1000, thene lands bad
been withdrawn for irrigation pur
poses but afterwards restore. The
restoring order of May 12, 190C, allow
ed the lands to become subject to im
mediate settlement, but not to become
subject to selection or entry, until on
and after tbe 3d day of September,
I'.; the day on which these applica
tions were made. It appears that
homestead claimant Dunlap placed a
small cabin on an adjoining tract to
tbe one involved believing that the
cabin was on this tract but which
when he ascertained that it was not
on this laud was removed a short dis
tance onto the land involved. lint the
cabin was not on tbe laud involved
when the timber applicant made his
application and bence was no notice
to him that the land was occupied
when he made bis application. It
does not appear that Dunlap did any
thing more than build tbe cabin going
to show that he followed up his settle
ment w ith such acts as indicated his
purpose to make homestead entry on
the laud. -
Tbe decision of the Kegi'-ter is af
firmed. Tbe homestead application of
Dunlap is rejected and the timber aud
stone application of Latourette w ill tie
allowed should this decision become
final. Notify the parties of this de
cision and Dunlap of his right of ap
peal to the Secretary of the Interior.
Sigued, Fred Dennett
Assistant Commissioner.
HQFN IM8EDED
III PINE TREE
Thought to be the Horn
Of an Ibex.
TREE SAID TO BE 133 YEARS OLD
Curiosity Was Found by Forest
Ranger J. S. Elder in Hill
Near Paisley.
1 A lew weeks ago The K.xaniiner pub
lished a story, copied trorn the' Silver
Lake Leader, concerning a curiosity
found by Forest Itanger J. S. Elder,
in the mountains near Paisley some
time ago, in tbe shape of a mountain
sheep's born imbedded in a piue tree.
The tree was said to be 131) years old,
reckoning from the grain, was of
thrifty growth and about thirty inches
in diameter. Tbe born protruded
from tbe trunk of tbe tree about eight
inches, and when Mr. Elder cut tbe
tree down and sawed of a block, be
found tbat the born penetrated tbe
tree aouut sixteen inches, and extend
ing past tbe heart of tbe tree. Tbe
block is now at tbe Thornton drug
store, and while exhibited in tbe win
dow waa tbe object ofouch comment
and speculation as to how tbe thing
got there. Some believe tbat it was tbe
work of a human being who put the
horn in the tree while it waa small
while others cling to tbe opinion tbat
the animal, in some way became lodg-
i ed w ith bis born against the tree and
ipetished there, the tree eventually
j growing around the born. There is
i also difference of ooinion as to what
kind of an animal it was. The first
impression was tbat it was a mountain
sheep, but as tbe horn is only slightly
curved, and tbe born of a sheep is
circled around the bead. Others be
lieve it is tbe horn of an ibex, as the
born of this animal is nearly straight.
J Whatever i is tbe thing is quite a
curiosity.
Commence to Issue Notices.
The land office will begin thio week
issuing notices for publication of
proof on tbe claims tiled upou the
2tb of October. It will take some
time to get through tbe list of names.
K
Robnett-Cloud.
Ernest Robnett was up to Lakeview
from Pine Creek last Friday, and
bought a marriage license and had
cards printed at The Examiner ofuce
announcing tbe marriage of himself
and Mlaa Myra Cloud. The happy
event took place at the home of the
bride's parents, Mr. and Mrs. B. l'
Cloud, near New Fine Creek, on Sue
day, December first. Tbe bride lived
in Lakeview for a few years, and her
w inning ways earned ber many friends
here. She is a Goose Lako girl, hav
ing spent all her life in this valley.
Tbe groom is a Ooosa Lake valley
boy, tha son of Alex Robnett, a pio
neer settler of Nsw Pine Crek, aud Is
a steady and worthy young man.
The Examiner joins tbe boat of
friends ot the happy young couple In
wishing them a long life of happiness
and prosperity.
Latest Land Decision.
The Lakeview land office has receiv
ed tbe comissioner's decision in tbe
case of Lyman E. Latourette, timber
and stone applicant, vs. Robert E.
Dunlap, homesteader, on the same
lands. The letter follows :
On June 11th, 1907, you transmit
ted tbe testimony and other papers in
tbe above entitled case involving the
west half, southwest qarter, southeast
quarter sothwest quarter, southwest
quarter southwest quarter, sea. 33 T.
37, S., R. 0, E., W. M. This is a con
troversy involving tbe claim of Lyman
E. Latourette to the land involved
under an application made by him on
September 3d, 1906, at 10:10, a. m.,
to make timber land entry, and an ap
plication of Robert E. Dunlap to make
homestead entry for the same lands on
September 3, 1908 at 10:30 a. m. Don
lap alleging that he established settle-
gowtui i iMwgrM'iinmni -iy.'i " ,1'-'" "-".." '.'V.
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' Vis i V
r . - A-.-.ii. ... v-r
WILLIAM B. WILSON.
William B. Wilson, who Is a candidate to Kiicceed Jc.hu Mitchell as presi
dent of the United Mine Workers of America. t-ongiessmiui elect from tbe
ytfth Pennsylvania district and was chosen a mem'ier of the house of repre
sentatives over a multimillionaire. He Is forty-live yem :d. In self educated,
la the father of ten children and has been proinh e In the rank of organ!
labor for more than fifteen years.