The Mill City enterprise. (Mill City, Or.) 1949-1998, March 19, 1953, Page 6, Image 6

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    High Efficiency
At Marion Forks
Fish Hatchery
Based on operation records of the
Fish Commission of Oregon, the Mar­
ion Folks salmon hatchery has oper­
ated during the ; mt two and one-half
years with a theoretical efficiency of
X3ts% according to Col. Thomas H.
Lipscomb, Portland district engineer.
The hatchery was constructed by
the Portland district, corps of engi­
neers, to preserve the salmon run in
the North Santiam river blocked by
the construction of the Detroit dam
project.
fF <***■
During the years 1951 and 1952,
k.
>
I
"L
more than 668,000 spring chinook
c
fingerling, or about 93% of the eggs
taken, were released by the hatchery
into the North Santiam river.
Hall chinook released during this
period totaled more than 83% of eggs
taken or 834,858. Released steelhead
totaled 2,348,023 or about 74% of
eggs taken.
Colonel Lipscomb said the Marion
Forks hatchery, 22 miles above I)e- 1
troit dam, replaced the state-owned
hatchery at Mehama. A permanent
ealmon egg collecting station has been I
This picture shows operation of grinding fish for food
Marion Fork hatchery, built by corps of wngineers 22 miles above Detroit dam on North Santitim river to preHerve
constructed below Big Cliff re-regu­ for millions of fish in hatchery tanks.
Some 668,000
salmon run blocked by dam, is operating at more than 83 percent efficiency under direction of state fish commission,
lating reservoir, 2.5 miles downstream
spring Chinook fingerlings, 93 percent of eggs taken,
Col. Thomas H. Lipscomb, Portland district engineer, reported. Plant replaced state-owned property at Mehama.
from Detroit dam on the North San­
freed in two years.
(Photos courtesy of The Oregonain)
tiam river and was placed in opera­
i
tion in 1952. Detroit dam is 45 miles 834,858 fall chinook fingerling and eleven months of the calendar year result of more facilities at the hatch­
east of Salem.
1894,046 steelhead fingerling were re­ 1952 totaled $46,435.41 with the state ery being placed in operation, an in­
Although constructed by the corps leased for a grand total of 2,068,827. paying $5,958.37 and the corps of crease in the number of eggs and
of engineers, the hatchery and egg
fingerling handled and a general all
Spring chinook egg take in 1952 engineers $40,477.04.
collecting station are operated by the
was 270,440 and the steelhead egg ( Increasing operational costs are the around increase in maintenance costs.
The Oregon State Highway Department is offer­
Fish Commission of Oregon under
Colonel Lipscomb said construction
take 2,706,789 for a grand total of
ing
40,000
board feet of 2x10 T & G Fir in place in a
contract agreement whereby the
has been started on a game-fish
2,977,329. During the same period
.United States pays the increased costs
flume
at
Sardine
Creek on the North Santiam High­
hatchery, principally for rainbow and
329,600 spring chinook fingerling were
of operation and maintenance.
way.
cutthroat trout, at Leaburg on the
released as were 1,453,977 steelhead
(Continued from Page 1)
Cost of construction of the hatch­
McKenzie river and a salmon hatch­
This flume is no longer required, therefore will
fingerling for a total of 1,783,577.
it
is
hard
to
reduce
transportation
ery and egg collection station, includ­
ery at Oak Ridge was completed last
costs
and
marketing
charges.
sell
this
lumber upon the highest offer received until
Held
over
at
the
end
of
the
calen
­
ing all engineering costs, was $835,-
Thomas explains that for Oregon year on the Middle Fork Willamette
dar year 1952 were 212.056 spring
2:00
o
’
clock
P.M., April 1, 1953, subject to the final
000, Colonel Lipscomb said.
river. These installations were made
At the beginning of the operatioh chinook fingerling and 1,526,606 steel­ farmers, chahges in freight rates have
approval
of
the
Oregon State Highway Commission
a double-barrelled effect.
Costs of necessary by the construction of Look-
in 1950, 443,279 spring chinook eggs head fingerling.
with
the
right
reserved
to reject any and all bids.
’
out
Point
dam
on
the
Middle
Fork
Cost of operation of the Marion transportation come out of what con­
were transferred from Mehama to
Willamette
river
and
other
Willam
­
sumers
pay
for
Oregon
farm
products.
Successful bidder will be required to pay cash for
Marion Forks and 1.(MM),000 eyed fall Forks hatchery from July through
ette basin dams.
the
lumber
prior to its removal and have the same
chinook eggs from the Tanner Creek December, 1950, was $16,164.47 of Higher rates make returns to farmers
I lower than they would have been
hatchery below Bonneville dam. No which the State of Oregon paid $3,-
removed
within
sixty days from date of acceptance
Costs of transportation rates on farm products are higher
250.02 and the corps of engineers otherwise.
fingerling were released that year.
of
offer.
,
than
ever
are
also
added
to
prices
of
many
before.
They
are
not
like-
During 1951 the spring chinook egg $12,914.45.
FOR INFORMATION contact Mr. C. W. Parker,
take numbered 266,790 and the steel­
Operating costs in 1951 totaled $39,- things Oregon farmers and consumers ly to decline very much Efforts may
be made to secure additional increases.
head egg take 2,517,798 for a total of 870.90 of which the state paid $6,- buy.
State Highway Bldg., Salem; Telephone No. 4-2171,
Oregon farmers whose products These may be countered by efforts
2,784,588.
During the same period 500.04 and the corps of engineers
Ext. 717, Oregon State Highway Department, Salem,
339,923 spring chinook fingerling, $33,370.86. Operation during the first must be shipped long distance to mar­ of producer and consumer groups.
Oregon.
ket need to be thinking about the im­ Freight costs must be paid by con­
mediate and long-term effects of high sumers. They come out of returns to
OREGON STATE HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT
distribution costs, advises Thomas.
farmers. Increases discourage farm
State Highway Building, Salem, Oregon
The agricultural economist says production and may force some farm-
.I
.
:: X :: •• : X X :: :: X
:
X X X X x X : X
:: x X r.
:: :: x x :: X X x XX X XXX!«
these facts stand out clearly. Freight ' ers and shippers out of business
Lumber For Sale
Farmers Face-
more engine power!
Advanced Loadmaster engine­
standard equipment on 5000 and
6000 Scries heavy-duty and for-
. ward-control models, optional on
r 4000 Series he.ivy-duty trucks.
vh’dî you get
Ç 53 Chevrolet
more economy!
'
—
The new stamina of Chevrolet
trucks, plus extra gasoline econ­
omy in heavy-duty models with
improved Loadmaster engine, re­
duces hauling costs per ton-mile.
CHEVROLET
MOST NOKIN THINS
A. E. ARMSTRONG. Agent
Phone 1S05
Gene Teague Chevrolet
Chevrolet Sales and Service
STAYTON. OREGON