The Mill City enterprise. (Mill City, Or.) 1949-1998, February 07, 1952, Page 3, Image 3

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    IDANHA
L
IDANHA COMMUNITY CHURCH
Sunday school 10 a.m.
Morning service 11 a.m.
Evening service 7:00 p.m.
Thursday prayer meeting 7:30 p.m.
Bob Unger, Pastor
* • *
DETROIT CHRISTIAN CHURCH
Sunday school at 9:45 a.m.
Preaching at 11 a.m. by Leland
Keithly, minister.
Youth meeting 6:30 each Sunday
evening.
• * •
SANTIAM CHAPEL
(U ndenominational)
Services in old Lyons school house,
Lyons, Ore.
Sunday school 10 a.m.
Morning worship 11 a.m.
Evening worship 7:30 p.m.
« * •
ST. CATHERINE CATHOLIC
CHURCH, MILL CITY
Mass at 9 a.m. every Sunday.
Confessions heard before Mass.
Fr. Franz Schubert, Pastor
* * «
OUR LADY OF LOURDES PARISH
Jordan. Oregon
Mass: 1st, 2nd, and 5th Sunday at
8:30 a.m.
Mass: 3d and 4th Sunday 10:30 a m.
Fr. Leandefr Schneider, SDS., Pastor
* * *
FIRST CHRISTIAN CHURCH
Sunday school 9:45 a.m.
Morning worship 10:55 a.m.
Young Peoples meeting 6:30 p.m.
Evening Services 7:30 p.m.
Wed., 7:30 p.m. Bible study hour.
Mr. Hugh Jull, Pastor
* « *
ST. PATRICK'S PARISH
Lyons, Oregon
Mass: 1st, 2nd, and 5th Sunday at
10:30 a.m.
Mass: 3rd and 4th Sunday 8:30 a.m.
Fr. Leander Schneider, SDS., Pastor
* * *
GATES COMMUNITY CHURCH
OF CHRIST
Sunday school at 9:45 a.m.
Morning worship 11 a.m.
Loren R. Swanson, Pastor
* * *
LYONS METHODIST CHURCH
Church school at 9:45 a.m.
Worship service at 11 a. m.
Evening service at 8 p.m.
Choir at morning service.
Choir practice at 7 p.m. Thursday.
Rinke R. Feenstra, Pastor
« * •
L.D.S. of JESUS CHRIST CHURCH
Detroit
Sunday school each Sunday 10 a.m.
in high school building, Detroit.
Priesthood meeting 11 a.m.
Zealand Fryer, Presiding
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
3rd and Juniper, Mill City
Sunday 11 a.m.
Wednesday meeting 4th Wed. 8 pm.
• • •
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Morning worship 11 a.m.
Music by choir.
Young People at 6:30 p.m., Miss
Alice Smith, leader.
• • •
ASSEMBLY OF GOD CHURCH
Sunday School 10 a.m.
Morning Worship 11 a m.
Young people's service at 6:30 p.m.
Evening service 7:30 p.m.
Prayer meeting and Bible study,
Thursday at 8 p.m.
Rev. W. D. Turnbull, Pastor.
* * *
FREE METHODIST CHURCH
North Mill City
Sunday school at 9:45 a.m.
Morning worship 11 a m.
Junior church 11:00 a.m.
Evening service 7:30 p.m.
Wednesday prayer meeting 7:30 pm.
Phone 1906.
Rev. C. O. Tremain, Pastor
* * *
COMMUNITY CHURCH
Full Gospel Preaching
Sunday school 10 a.m.
Morning worship 11 a.m.
Evangelistic service 8 p.m.
Prayer meeting Tues, at 1:30 p.m
Preaching services Wednesday and
Friday 8 p.m.
By MRS. RUTH JOHNSON
Mr. Ray Watkins spent his vaca­
tion in the south. He visited in
Eureka and Riverside, Cal. It was
his first plane trip and he liked it.
He visited his brother, Jim, ip Eureka,
and his brother-in-law, David Davis,
who is stationed at March Field.
Mr. and Mrs. Earl Schocning of St.
Helens, Ore., visited at the home of
Mr. a/id Mrs. Geo. Brasmer. Earl
Schorning is nephew of Mr. Brasmer.
On the sick list this week were Mr.
Braxton Fouts, Mr. Even Evenson,
Mr. Norman Garbult, Mr. Frank Ray.
Mr. and Mrs. Noyes Whitten and
children “Cookie" and “Rusty” have
returned home from their trip. They
were gone about six weeks visiting
Arizona and points south.
Mr. and Mrs. W. L. Rudy spent the
weekend visiting their son and family
at Cottage Grove.
Mr. and Mrs. Lester Beeson of
Eugene visited Mr. and Mrs. L. C.
Davis over the weekend, John Davis i
won the universal pop-up toaster the
door prize at the March of Dimes
dance Feb. 2nd. John said he will
start his hope chest with it.
Mr. and Mrs. Richard Cannon and
tiny daughters, Sheila and Sherilee,
visited with the Fouts over the week- 1
end Mrs. Cannon is the Fouts
daughter, Jean.
I have been on the sick list myself i
this week so I didn't get out to drag 1
in much news.
Things turned out to please the
majority of us last Monday night to
keep our high school in the upper
Canyon. Of course some of the
students wanted to go to Mill City
to school, but that, in time, would of
been like a new toy.
The shine
would soon wear off when they would
of had to get out of bed an hour
earlier every morning, it would not
be so hot. I was young once and
one thing I remember above all was,
I sure hated to get out of bed in the
morning — I know I would not
of liked to be all shook up like
“Humpty Dumpty" before I reached
my classroom. It would of taken all
desire for education out of me.
Now if we all buckle down and go
without a few luxuries we can get that
high school in no time at all. If
every man in the canyon would donate
a days work in moving the old high
school and fixing it up. We could
have it next fall The women could
donate labor, food and etc. to feed the
men on the job. I know I would,
although, I have no children of my
own school age. This is the way I
look at it, the neighbors children are
my children. This is my community.
By Ed Nofziger
"JOE BEAVER"
Welz Mobilgas
Sublimity
or
HATHAWAY GARAGE
Rhone 3202, Mill City
Forest Servios, U. S. Department of Agriculture
"If you just cut trees that are easy to get at you'll ruin this area.
What you need i* logging roads to the hard-to-get stuff.**
3—THE MILL CITY ENTERPRISE
so the children of this community are
partly my responsibility too. I love
every last one of them, although. I
will have to admit I would like to
twittie a few ears now and then.
* • •
January 31. 1952
day parties and family gatherings.
I bet it has witnessed many a smile
and tear too. As old hands that used
it had passed on and younger hands
took over.
This rolling pin although battle
scared and with one of its handles
missing, is one of my most precious
household tools. 1 wonder if any
poor unfortunate husband ever got
clonked with it. I can’t ask the pin
and I would not even if it could
answer. All of its family secrets.
It can keep its secrets to itself.. I
respect it and its past just as long as
it is a good working companion to
me. I will never try to dig up its
past.
MY FAITH Fl LI. ROLLING I’lN
I have a rolling pin that was hand­
made one hundred and forty-one
years ago near Odessa. Russia, and
it is still in good working condition
too. It was made by Mr. Peter Bowes
in eighteen hundred eleven, for his
bride Magdalina.
The pin is made of soft maple and
basswood. One handle is missing and
shows signs of hard usage. But be­
lieve me, 1 would not Irade it for a
dozen of your modern glass or plastic
Time and a half pay after 40 hours
ones. It rolls just as good as it did
one hundred and forty one years ago. in any week is required by the Federal
This rolling pin was given to me wage-hour law for non-exempt cov­
in nineteen forty one by a very old ered workers.
friend of mine. She was eighty seven
at the time. She never had any
daughters of her own, and as it was
the custom of the family to hand the
WE ARE PLEASED
pin from mother to daughter, she
TO SERVE YOU!
picked me out as the one that had to
be that daughter she never had. She
We hope you are pleased
knew I was a good cook and a very
with our service.
good cook apreciates a good rolling
pin. I in turn told her I would turn
the pin over to my daughter or grand­
daughters when my stay upon earth
was done.
I have wondered as I have used this
old pin what tales it could tell if it
Mill City
could talk, I bet it has rolled pasteries
for many a wedding, birthdays, holi-
Mom's and Pop's
CAFE
CONSUMER ADVISORY COM MITTEE—The Consumer's point of view
iras under discussion at a recent meeting of the National Consumer Ad­
visory Committee icith Office of Price Stabilization official* in II ashing­
ton. A portion of the committee is shown here with Hr*, Chase doing
Woodhouse (center). Special Assistant to Price Stabilization Director
Michael V. DiSalle who serves as chairman. Members and the organiza­
tions nominating them are from left to right: Dr. Hazel Kyrk, American
Home Economics Association; Samuel Jacobs, Congress of Industrial
Organizations; Mrs. Hilbert F. Loebs, General Federation of II omen's
Clubs; Thomas X, Clancy, American Legion; .Mrs. Woodhouse; Mrs
Rose Kerber, National Association of Consumers; Il allace J. Campbell,
Cooperative League of the United States; Dr. Dorothg R. Ferebee, Na­
tional Council of Negro Women; Dr. Persia Campbell, National Hoard.
YWCA; Mrs. Edith Sherrard, American Association of University II omen.
Consumer Durables' Share of First Quarter 1952 Allotment
Lets get down to the Sol id Facts/
Chevrolet Trucks Can Save You Money
All Along the Line
■MH Group II mcludo* lot* MWWllel civil»«* dorm wch *s eigoroHo
ligMorv toys, piooo*. «rticlo«
odornmont «nd docor*liO«K
RUGGED
j PoaMngo* cert and truck*
■fro/
Announcing
*
( C O**»ouoho«* of l’ondo rd *<v«p«*owf
ood ’nm »Wurtrotod .i dopondoof o*
c vor iob«/i* y of moferiolj
Fad NO. 1—More Truck for Less Money
Fact NO. 2— Rock-Bottom Operating
T hf facts show you how a Chev­
rolet truck can mean real substantial
savings on your hauling or delivery job.
Chevrolet trucks cost less to buy, less to own and
operate. Their dependable valve-in-head engines, famous for
power and stamina, keep fuel consumption low. Sturdy Ad­
vance-Design features keep maintenance costs down. Value
is built in to stay in—safeguarding your truck investment.
All over America there arc more Chevrolet trucks in use
than any other make. Come in and talk over your truck needs.
Costs
A ttu
Location
OE
POWIR CHAIN SAWS
Sales & Service
In East Lyons
Put Your Saw In Service Now
Fact NO. 3 —Engineered and Built for Your Loads
ALL WORK GUARANTEED
Reliable and Experienced Workmanship
Fact No. 4 — Lower, Slower Depreciation
YOUR LOCAL CHEVROLET DEALER
Gene Teague Chevrolet
Phone Z344
Stayton, Ore.
B Ö* H Equipment
DAY OR NIGHT SERVICE
Phone 1113
LYONS, ORE.