The Mill City enterprise. (Mill City, Or.) 1949-1998, December 20, 1951, Page 3, Image 3

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    3—THE MILL CITY ENT E K I* RIS E
December 20, 1951
- -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
WE WILL BE
CLOSED
FROM
December 23 to January 2nd
Chuck’s Tavern
IT'S LITTLE WONDER that Saint
* Nick is especially generous to the
American people. History proves
that the Americans have done a
lot for Saint Nick!
They have given him a new
name, a new face and figure, and
a new means of transportation.
The original European version
of Saint Nick pictured him as a
tall angular man who rode on a
bony gray mare. Both the horse
and Saint Nick looked as if they
hadn’t had a good meal in some
time.
The early English settlers in
this country started giving Saint
Nicholas his “New Look." The Eng­
lish children adopted the legendary
Christmas figure from the Dutch,
but the English children had trou­
ble pronouncing "Saint Nickolous.”
Somehow the name changed to
“Santa Kalouf.” and finally it was
corrupted to Santa Claus.”
However, this was only the be-
ginning In 1809 Washington Irving,
n his “Knickerbocker's History of
New York,” wrote of the Saint as
the guardian of New York City.
Irving described Saint Nick as a
jolly fellow with a broad-brimmed
hat ard huge breeches. He taught
Saint Nick to smoke a long pipe,
and. in the story, replaced his
shuffling hay-burner with a trim
wagon.
A short time later. Saint Nicholas’
transportation was ‘aided by
Clement Moore in his famous poem.
“The Visit from Saint Nicholas,”
written in 1882. Moore, a professor
of divinity in a New York theolog­
ical seminary, gave Saint Nick a
sleigh, twinkling eyes, cheeks like
roses, nose like a cherry, and a
round little belly.
Today’s Santa Claus is by no
means streamlined, but he is a
far cry from the lean, ascetic, som­
berly dressed fellow who, for cen­
turies, on Christmas Eve., guided
his mare through the streets of
Europe.
2 Miles East of Gates
Wishing You All a Very Merry Christmas
and a Happy New Year’
Stop at. . .
CURLY'S UNION STATION
RECEIVE ONE OF THEIR
SEASON’S GREETINGS
From
OLD HONEST CURLY PERSONALLY
Geo. Curly Mielke
Gates, Oregon
PROTECTION!
*
BETTER PACKAGER
1
Kellom's Fresh Meats
FRESH DAILY — VERY REASONABLE PRICES
Kellom’s Grocery
“Setti
OPEN WEEK DAYS: 8 A.M. to 7 P.M.
CLOSED: Sundays and Holidays
WE GIVE TRADING STAMPS AND ALUMINUM AND DISHES
N
A, îïWrg- Christmas
a real old fashioned
M. G. and R. M. BRASSFIELD
LYONS
■
-z
“There’ll Always Be a Detroit”
I
Stctt ScuwHOtt 'l/itta.ye
MILL CITY
S'
To wish you
A pair of ancient church Dells,
brought to Frankenmuth, Mich,
from Bavaria shortly after Frank­
enmuth was founded as an Indian
mission, has been calling the con­
gregation of St. Lorenz to Christ­
mas eve services for more than a
IGO years.
Ninety-five per cent of the resi­
dents of the small community are
members of the church, earning
the village the title of “the most
Christian community in the United
States.”
Frankenmuth has never had a
crime of violence, and, as far as
residents can remember, no one
has been jailed over a period of
25 years. The only visitors to the
lockup wepe transients given a
night's lodging.
DETROIT TAVERN
RED and OTTO
■ ——
X
IV
HILL TOP LOCKERS
BILL and VIOLA HIRTE
HAILING NEW BORN KING
... Carol Singing Time . ..
MILL CITY
V
WITH EVERY GOOD WISH
FOR A
HAPPY HOLIDAY
SEASON
YClYDT,
--------
Mill City Wrecker Service
GEORGE STEWART
Consolidated