The Mill City enterprise. (Mill City, Or.) 1949-1998, December 20, 1951, Page 12, Image 12

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    December 20. 19~>1
TIE—THE MII.L CITY ENTERPRISE
MILL CITY
A nd A ll G ood
W ishes
to
Yov, Ot K F riends
Girod’s
Market
ON THE HIGHWAY
at STAYTON
CLOSED
CHRISTMAS DAY
TURKEYS
Dressed New York Style
39c "■
CASCADE HAMS
Christmas Wrapped
10 to 12 lbs. ggc lb
CpI. Harmon Reported
Missing In Action
Word from the defense department
Mrs. Anne May McClintock is a
new employee of the Muir’s bakery rece ived Monday of last week by Mrs.
beginning this week. Mrs. McClin- | C. A. Harmon of Salem, formerly of
Gates, that her son, Cpl. James E.
took is the former Miss Nelson.
Rev. William Turnbull and Shelby Harmon, 36, was missing in action in
Umphress were visitors at a fellow­ Korea brought sadness to the hearts
ship meeting of the Assembly of God of relatives and friends in Gates.
Cpl. Harmon, who re-enlisted in the
church in Independence this week
Monday. Rev. Turnbull preached at , service November 4, 1950 had been
missing since October 16. Harmon
the services.
Mr. and Mrs. Victor Galbraith were had been in Korea with the 24th in­
Salem visitors last Saturday evening. fantry division since February this
Mr. and Mrs. Louis Drew and family year and had been on patrol duty until
of five children have moved to Inde­ a foot injury confined him to a hos­
pendence where they will make their pital for several months. Upon his
home. Mr. Drew will be employed by release from the hospital he returned
the Horst hop ranch of Independence. to combat.
A veteran of World War II, he first
Mr. and Mrs. D. B. Hill were Salem
callers Tuesday of this week on busi­ entered the army in September 1940.
During that war he spent three years
ness.
in Alaska and about a year in Europe
RALEIGH HAROLD, Florist, open
Sundays and evenings, flowers tele­ under Gen. Patton.
Cpl. Harmon is a brother of Mrs.
graphed anywhere. Funeral sprays,
Clyde Oliver and Harry Harmon of
planters, pot plants,* corsages, wed­
Gates and Mrs. Phyllis Goodwin of
dings, also shrubs and landscaping.
Mill City. He had worked in this
319 W. Washington, Stayton. Phone
area as a logger for a number of years
3684.
42tf
and has a wide circle of friends here,
Mr. and Mrs. Paul H. Higley expect who, with his relatives will anxiously
a visit from their son and daughter- await word of his safety.
in-law, Sgt. and Mrs. Howard Higley
this week. Sgt. Higley is in the air
force and is stationed at Bengor, Me., sett, vice grand in charge. Special
they plan to spend the holidays with event of the evening was a Christmas
party and gift exchange.
Allura
his parents.
Pfc. Mark Higley of the air force Chance was in charge of the program
stationed at Las Vegas, Nev., returned and several readings were presented
to duty this week after spending the and carols sung followed by the open-
past two weeks visiting his parents, I ing of gifts. Following the exchange
of gifts pot-luck refreshments were
Mr. and Mrs. Paul Higley.
Mrs. Harry Wood has been confined I served in the lodge dining rooms.
Ramon Peterson is home from Cor­
to her home this week. Mrs. Wood
operates the Woods »try goods store vallis to spend the holidays with his
parents, .Mr. and Mrs. Walt Peterson.
next to the post office here.
The Nu-Method Cleaners will be He is a sophomore at Oregon State
closed on Monday before Christmas college.
Mr .and Mrs. Carl Foster are spend­
and New Year’s day.
Glen V. Sorensen of Salem was a ing the Christmas holidays in Port­
visitor in the city Thursday evening land.
David Carr is home from Univer-
this week.
Santiam Rebekah Lodge No. 166 versity of Oregon to spent the holi­
met Wednesday evening, Dec. 19, with days with his parents.
Eugeqe and Lawrence Thornley are
Ada Dart, noble grand and Juliu Bas-
spending the Christmas holidays with
their parents. They are attending the
University of Oregon.
The Mill City Three Links club held
a no host luncheon and Christmas
party in the IOOF hall dining rooms
at noon Wednesday, Dec. 19. Mrs.
Rachel Olmstead was in charge of
arrangements and decorations. Fol­
lowing the luncheon, a gift exchange
was held. There were about thirty-
five members present.
The Theta Rho girls met December
13th and held election of officers.
Maxine Schroeder was elected pres­
ident; Virginia Timm, vice president;
Hazel Caudle, secretary, and Lynn
Wait, treasurer.
A committee was
appointed to write up their by-laws
and constitution. Pot-luck lunch was
’ enjoyed. Purchase of a new Bible
was voted.
BEFORE Bl » ING SHOES
SEE THE M ISON LINE
Rubber Boot
Work
Fu/7 Soles and
FRESH ( RANBERRIES
29c »’
CELERY
Heels
It mokes on old
tradition warmer ond
□ve
NN
<
z the chance to express
CHRISTMAS LECTURE . . .
“Now this is a Christinas tree,”
big brother appears to be tell­
ing the toddler. “It grows in the
living room only once a year,
and it always has a lot of nice
presents under it.”
friends like you.
I
PAULINE’S
QameA for <Nll
GATES
Atabe Chriótmaó
PAULINE and BOB BONITZ
Pamilij Partly
Christmas is the time for family
jet-togethers. One of the best ways
■ o make these gatherings memora­
ble for all concerned is to engage in
games which the whole group can
play.
A nice one to start off with would
be a Sugar Plum Hunt. Have one
member of the family hide Christ­
mas candies ahead of time in vari­
ous nooks and corners around the
house. At a given signal everyone
starts hunting and gathering the
pieces. The one who gathers the
greatest number would be given a
prize.
The Christmas Puzzle is another
good one to get things going. Look
through some magazines, which are
filled with pictures of Santa Claus
at this time of year. Cut out enough
of these to go around, paste them
on stiff cardboard, and cut them
into pieces, Then put each group of
pieces in a separate paper bag. At
the signal, everyone opens a ba§
and starts putting the puzzle to
gether.
The Xmas Scramble Contest is
good for a group with older children
in it. This is simply a contest to
see who can unscramble a group of
words the fastest. Just for fun. see
if you can work out the following—
astna. erireden, eftsgil, d nca.
gosiknet, erte, trepesn, hupne,
alsorc, and niborb.
fo You and Yours
//appy, Prosperous New Year
The Maples Cafe & Tavern
l1» Miles East of Gates
if Senia Lissu
/ust Arrived...
9c ,b
A DAUGHTER—To Mr. and Mrs.
William R. Wilson, Mill City, Dec. 14,
at Salem Memorial hospital.
CHASE & SANBORN
COFFEE
79c
DEL MONTE PUMPKIN
No. 21J can I 7c
Never
CONWAY’S WHOLE
CRANBERRY SAUCE
2 for 29c
Benjamin Franklin originated the
If Santa Claus misses some young­
practice of printing letters to the sters this year, it could be offered
editor.
plausibly that he was not able to
round up enough reindeer for
yearly trip around the globe.
The reindeer shortage has
come, in recent years, much
acute, It has been estimated
wolves have destroyed 500.000 of
Santa's helpers within the last
decade or so, leaving an approx­
imate 50.000
The difficulty of keeping the ani­
mals alive in a temperate climate
makes it unlikely that any of the
few remaining will be transported
a Dull Moment
LARGE BISQUICK
39c Pk*-
BISHOP’S
CHOC (H ATE DROPS
“At the Bottom of the Hill”
29c
MILL CITY TAVERN
BISHOPS
HARD MIX ( ANDY
19c ’»>
<1
M
DURKEE’S MARGARINE
1
“There’ll Always Be a Detroit
29c »’
GOLD MEDAL FLOUR
» lbs. 49c
from their native regions to other
lands for .the holiday season,
has been done in the past.
American boys and g'rls
have to be satisfied with stand-ms.
The few department stores featur­
ing Santa's complete outfit this
year will be using native deer as
substitute for Dasher, Prancer, and
company.
ISHING you the joy* of
bmed with the pleos-
moke this o goy ond
Pay Cash
and
bright Holiday, brimmed full of hap­
piness for eoch of you
Once ¿Iodide
SAVE at
Girod's
Clt 'u-dmaS
MERRY CHRISTMAS
■
V - • I •
•I. i ! I ur
-N
i ¡ í t
1
Hi/
I
AT STAYTON
i
B ackache
>r quick comforting help for Backache.
Rheumatic Pau.« (WtUM Up Nigh»*, atrong
urine, irruan»« paaeagr., t m Faina,
circlea under eve«, aid awohen ankle», dua
to non organtc and «.oo-ayatemic Kidney and
IM add r trouMea. it* Ceatea Qu»« k. complete
patiafaetton or more*
guarantead. A-k
jour drwet»*1 * *
'***■
CEDAR TAVERN
DETROIT
X.—
Did you know that the observ­
ance of Christmas was once for­
bidden in England—the home of
the Yule Log. the Carol-singer and
the wassailers'
• During the Reformation many
believed the undue jollity of Christ­
mas day was sacrilegious Parlia­
ment, on December 24. 1652, or­
dered that “no observance shall be
held of the five and twentieth day
of December, commonly called
Christmas day; nor any solemnity
used or exercised m churches upon
that day in respect thereof”
This edict proved to be very un­
popular with the masses of the
people It was not until many years
later, however, that Christmas was
once again regarded as a holiday
RALPH NIBLER
Chevron Service
MILL CITY
V