The Mill City enterprise. (Mill City, Or.) 1949-1998, December 06, 1951, Page 2, Image 2

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    ENTERPRISE
ri
The MILL C
Editorial Comments
MILL CITY. OREGON
DON PETERSON. Publisher
Entered as second-< la»a matter November Hi. 1944 at the post office at
Mill City, Oregon, under the Act of March 3. 1X79.
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING: One insertion for 50c or three for 11.00.
The Enterprise will not be responsible for more than one incorrect in­
_____ immediately. Display
sertion. Errors in advertising should be reported
Advertising 45c column inch. Political Advertising 75c inch.
NATIONAL
EDITORIAL
"THE PAPER THAT HAS NO ENEMIES HAS NO FRIENDS."
—George Putnam.
Winter’s Sting
The elements slugged the North Santiam canyon a blow below the belt
rthis week. Wind, rain, snow and cold—these adejed up to misery for this
•region's citizenry. Weather has always been a thing of vital interest to us
al)—it was to our ancestors and it will be to our children. Much talk and
speculation has been made about the weather. Commenting on the comments
about the weather, Mark Twain is reported as saying, "Everyone talks about
The weather, but nobody does anything about it!
Mark Twain must have
meant that nobody bothered to change the direction or force of the wind or
Jhe time when it rains.
Because we have not learned the art of making the weather suit our
fancy is no reason for letting it disrupt our lives. It long has been the bent
of men’s minds to seek out what the weather will be in the future. I he
success or failure of a vast armed invasion during war may hinge on the
decision of the weather man’s forecast.
Military commanders and high
executives stand humble and meek before their ruler—weather. The health
and welfare of the human race is bound to weather.
Why all this about weather? Lack of electricity and telephone service
was the immediate result of the present show of bad weather in the North
Santiam canyon. In the realm of not letting the weather disrupt our lives
is the idea of public utilities expecting and preparing for it. Then anything
less than howling storms will be met with a show of might. .Modern civil­
ization expects this: and it is reasonable that it should. The long periods of
power interruption experienced this week are not reasonable. Weather, alone,
is not the reason. The public is entitled to electricity and communication—
it is charged for both.
Election Falls
The political teapot has already begun to trail. A Presidential election
year falls upon the American people in 1952. Candidates and their friends
joust for the highest position in the nation. They have opened headquarters
in most of the larger cities. Taft and Warren have tossed their hats into
the ring for the Republican nomination.
Stassen. General Maj-Arthur, and “Ike’s” (assuming that "Ike" is a
Republican) hats are waving in the breeze ... a strong gust could blow
their hats beside those of Taft and Warren. Several dark-horses, including
Congressman Duff of Pennsylvania, and Governor Dewey of New York, are
not to be countecbout entirely on the Republican side of the ticket.
On the Democratic ledger, there is President Harry S. Truman. There
is little doubt, but what, as of this lime, the President can have the nomina­
tion if he so desires. Whether the President would have influence enough
lu nominate his successor should he decide against seeking re-election, is
another question.
Justice of the U. S. Supreme Court Vinson is considered by many as
Truman’s heir-apparent. Senator Kefauver of Tennessee and Senator Douglas
of Illinois are other possibilities, but it is not probable either would receive
the complete blessing of the President.
Regardless of who the candidates are^—the issues are more important.
Foreign policy issues will include the Korean conflict and the way it has
been conducted, aid to Europe, and re-armament. On the domestic front
will be the issues of corruption in government, price controls and ceilings,
civil rights, and development of the rivers of the northwest.
Out of the confusion that will be created from the truths and half-truths
—it will be the job of the American voter Io make the final decision. There
is no doubt that the election campaign upon us will be one of the bitterest
and hardest fought in many a year.
THE BOY'S SHOP
Headquarters for
BOY S WEARING APPAREL
2 to 16 Years
/)o )
our Holiday Shopping Early
OPEN Mondays, Fridays until 9 p.m. ’til Christmas
also December 22nd until 9 p.m.
LAYAWAY CHRISTMAS PLAN
AT
Illi BOrSSIW
339 N. High, SALEM
Open Friday Night ’Til 9
3 Miles East of Mill City
Dinners and Dancing
• 7
Davs
to 3 a.m.
* a Week From I p.m.
r
Italian Spaghetti
Dinner
$1.00
ALL YOl
CAN EAT!
SERVED FROM I P.M. TO 1 A M.
Orchestra Music for Dancing
Friday Saturday Cr Sunday
NATO in DIFFICULTIES at ROME ! U. S. military appropriations. Agree­
Not much has been said about it, ment also was reached at Rome that
but the meeting of nations in the American assistance to the defense of
North Atlantic Treaty organization the west would consist chiefly of wea­
rather
than
of
divisions.
(NATO) at Rome was pretty much pons
of a flop. General Eisenhower at­ Whether the supply will provide the
tended and outlined his plan for a 100 divisions which General Eisen­
European army. The French were a- hower has pointed to as the desired
greed and willing to let Germany re­ goal by 1954 for western security is
arm if the German units were part of doubtful.
Another hurdle not yet gotten over
the western command. But Britain
refused to go along and so did the Low is selection of fleet commanders for
Countries. As with the Schuman the combined fleets. Churchill is said
plan for integrating the coal-iron-steel to insist on a British naval officer for
industry of western Europe, Britain this command, while the United States
held out for independence. Premier ' thinks he should be an American.
Pleven, who had done much to work This may be one of the subjects Chur­
out the plan for the international chill will bring up when he comes to
army, expressed great disappointment Washington about New Year's.
Instead of asking for a fresh loan,
ovtr the British decision and Paul
Reynaud, French delegate at Rome, Churchill is reported to want a revival
predicted that the French national as­ of lend-lease. As in the world war he
sembly would now reject the proposal negotiated a trade of leases for bases
for a European army. This would in the Atlantic and Carribean to the
also queer the deal by which Germany United States in return for 50 over­
was to receive greater freedom but age destroyers; now he figures Britain
would agree to furnish troops for the is entitled to more munitions, machine
tools and raw materials in exchange
international army.
This comes on top of the worries of for the bases it is providing for the
both France and Britain over the United States in Britain. This makes
burdens of rearming. Their econo­ Britain a No. One target in event of
mies are slipping badly and they are war which adds emphasis to his ap­
ir. need of fresh transfusions of Amer­ peal for a fresh lend-lease deal.
At a meeting of the Council for
ican credit. One thing which was
worked out at Rome was a scheme to Europe in Strasbourg, a group of
resuscitate these countries without American senators and congressmen
going hat-in-hand to the U. S. con­ put rather pointed questions to the
gress. The method would be to place European delegates on why they had
in Europe American orders for war i made so little progress toward uni­
goods yvhich would be paid for out of fication. This probing gives a hint
that congress may be reluctant to ad­
vance more funds to Europe if it is so
unwilling to help itself through
integration.
All of which shows the difficulty of
Mr. Peterson:
getting separate nations to co-operate.
I would like to inform you on a
They do so in time of war. though
few things that you have put in your
[lerKHy even then. Under threat ot
paper that have misinformed people
, war they make attempts at co-opera­
about Gates high school. One is that
we do have four years of high school tion, but they are feeble and tardy.
English, and second, we have four Most of the time they adhere to
i their precious sovereignty. For all
years of Physical Education.
Another thing is that Mill City the effort Eisenhower has put forth
might not have a band if it wasn’t for in Europe, his accomplishments as
the co-operation of the Gates high measured by force-in-being are very
school, who loans Mill City their band limited. Instead of coming home in
I the spring when his year is up, get-
instruments.
Before you publish anymore mis­ ' ting release on the ground that the job
leading things about Gates high is done, he may come home with the
school, we wish you would find the feeling that the job is impossible, or
will take a far longer time. The
true facts first.
Enterprise Readers ¡Rome meeting must have been dis­
couraging to him and to others who |
After talking and listening in on have worked on the theory that a
various conversations about our Gates quick buildup of strength was neces­
School and the proposed consolidation, sary both for protection of the west
your reporter believes the Gates peo­ and for backing up the diplomatic arm
ple are justly proud of their achieve­ in its conversations with the USSR.
The temptation may be strong now
ment in continually building up and
maintaining
buildings,
furniture, to let Europe stew in its own juice.
We can't do that; for our cause is
equipment, transportation system and (pick
up the pieces and see what he can
a hot lunch program as their needs common. Neither can we carry the
load
alone. Eisenhower will have to
have arisen. Also, that these people
games, guns. With such gifts to the
rising generation is America invited
to celebrate the birth of the Christ-
child.
We heartily agree with Mrs. D
Leigh Colvin, president of the Na­
tional Woman’s Christian Temper-
ance Union, that in order to help “put
Christ back into Christmas” stores
should refuse to sell gambling toys
and parents to buy them. The prom­
ise of youth is a gift, not a gamble.
The revelation of the Christmas sea­
son is far removed from the revela­
tion of the Kefauver committee.—
From The Christian Science Monitor
HEMORRHOIDS ',t,s
• FISSURE • FISTULA
PROLAPSE ond
RECTAL disorders
• Stomach and Colon
Ailment*
NO HOSPITALIZATION
. IV« Booklet
I ( on
«■> Bequeei
K.qu.
DR R REYNOLDS CLINK
MOcrotOGisr
NATUROPATHIC FHVSICIAN
1144 CINTI» JT3IIT . ■ - TUPH0HI 3-»44»
SAUM
’MEN OF DISTÏNCTON”
Another portrait which the dis­
tillers will never seek for the whisky
ads: The Michigan teen ager who
drove his car squarely into the head­
lights of another approaching, or­
phaning in one moment 11 children
and killing three of four of his young
companions. The sole survivor said
the driver has been drinking.—From
The Christian Science Monitor
RICHARDS
TAVERN
NATURALLY
GATES
■
DR. MARK
LAHHILldAIN
REGISTERED OPTOMETRIST
Will be at his Mill City office in the Jenkins Building
Thursday afternoons 1 to 6 p.m.
Also Thursday evenings by Appointment
I
HOME OFFICE: 313 W. FIRST. ALBANY
£
TRAILER HOMES
Angelus •> Platt
Traveleze
DISPOSAL SERVICE
Phone 195 2
LEON \RD HERMAN
©
0
0
H
0
0
0
0
0
H
8
NEW AND USED
ALL SIZES
put together now, with such assistance
as Averell Harriman, director of
mutual aid, may be able to give.—
The Statesman
PARTS AND SUPPLIES
GAMBLING ON YOl TH
Commercialism thrives on Christ­
mas as crime thrives on gambling.
And somewhere in the middle of it all
stands the American parent, gazing
at Christmas counters piled high with
toys for Junior—toy roulette wheels,
pinball and slot machines, horseracing
South Side Trailers
ALBANY — 2 Miles South on 99E
AVO/D DANGERS OF PAYING BY CASH!
III__________
All th« praitig« and convenient« of your personal check
Cost Only
15c
GARBAGE
SERA K I
MILL CITY
g
o
I
Boles-Aero
per Check
$1.50 per month and up
Also serving (.ales, I »on«.
Idanha and Detroit
OREGON
A Friendly Place
To While Away
Your Idle Hours
Quality job printing at
The Mill City Enterprise
Editor's Leiter Box
dislike very much to see or hear erron-
ous or misleading statements, either
printed in the paper or spoken by sale­
men from the County or State depart­
ments.
The Gates Board does NOW. and
ALWAYS HAS maintained a Stand­
ard High School, meeting all the re­
quirements of the State Department
of Education in both Curriculum anti
facilities. NO student graduate of the
Gates High School was ever denied I
entrance to college due to lack of re­
quired subjects, unless he failed to
avail himself when it was taught. Sev­
eral graduates have entered college on
Scholarships.
‘
Any graduate will tell you he had.
or could have had, I years of English
(not 2 as the Enterprise stated last
week), 3 yrs. of Mathematics, (not 2
as stated last week), I years of Phys-
>ical Ed. (not 2 as stated), 3 yrs. of
Science, and 1 years of Social Science.
This Statement is not made by way
of bragging, but just to keep the
record STRAIGHT.
On every hand one hears the opinion
voiced that, step by step, we are drift­
ing towards State control, and away
from Local control, which is not con­
sidered good. The Enterprise quotes
at length from the Holy Report which
is taken here to be ‘just ore man’s
opinion’. We note that the Oregon
I Grange has secured a Referendum
holding this Legislation in obeyance
until the people have voiced an opin­
ion at the polls as to whether it is
good or bad. After all, it seems the
very roots of Democracy are vested
in a myriad of small school districts,
and not in a few large ones.
Gates is just newly incorporated,
newly assessed for the fire protection ,
plan, and the FUTURE of the town
seems not tor* clear at present. A
Union High School might not be too
strenuously opposed, but it hardly
seems likely that a change of any
kind will originate in Gates at pres­
ent. Consolidation might -eem the
¡answer to their problems in Mill City
or Detroit, but the Gates people firmly
I believe they are capable of operating
and maintaining their school, which
| they started in 1923.
Would the Enterprise try to explain
how it proposes to consolidate and
still leave the grade schools autono­
mous*
December fi. 1951
2—THE MILL CITV ENTERPRISE
MILL CITY STATE BANK
MEMRER FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORP
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