The Mill City enterprise. (Mill City, Or.) 1949-1998, November 15, 1951, Page 2, Image 2

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    November 15. 1951
2— THE MILL CITY ENTERPRISE
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COMMUNITY AIMS THRU CO-OPERATION
I
MILL CITY. OREGON
1. SANTIAM MEMORIAL HOSPITAL.
I
DON PETERSON. Publisher
2. MILL CITY STREET IMPROVEMENT.
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3.. LOCAL YOUTH RECREATION CENTER.
By MRS. EVA BRESSLER
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4. MILL CITY DIAL TELEPHONE SYSTEM
Mrs.
Pat Lyons was hostess
I the afternoon
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING: One insertion for 50c or three for SI 00
5. MILL CITY PARK PUBLIC SWIMMING POOL.
card club with
The Enterprise will not be responsible for more than one incorrect in­
I party held at the Rebekah hall,
6. ELIMINATION OF BANFIELD’S NIGHTMARE.
•ertion. Errors in advertising should be reported immediately. Display
Wednesday afternoon, Several tables
7. MILL CITY AREA SEWAGE DISPOSAL SYSTEM.
Advertising 45c column inch. Political Advertising 75c inch.
of 500 followed a one thirty dessert
SEPTEMBER is the Month for . . ,
8. IMPROVE HIWAY 222 BETWEEN MILL CITY AND LYONS.
luncheon. High score went to Mrs.
9. OBTAIN CANYON YEAR 'ROUND PAYROLL INDUSTRIES.
Vacationers
re-
NEWSPAPER
SMUGGLING:
.
national editorial
Sam Bridges second high to Mrs.
turning from abroad may find
10. DETROIT, GATES, AND MILL CITY UNION HIGH SCHOOL.
PUBLISHERS
Donovan, low to Mrs. John Kunkle.
themselves in a peck of trouble
Attending the party were Mesdames
(F
''ASSOCIATION
with Customs inspectors. This is
%
Bob Free, Vem Nydegger, Sam Brid­
return-home month for many
ges, Percy Hiatt, Bert Lyons, War­
travelers and the little keepsakes
ren Shepherd, George Huffman,
and baubles picked up in the gay
“THE PAPER THAT HAS NO EM MIES II \S NO FRIENDS."
Orville Downing. Bob Carleton, Ar­
places of foreign countries some­
George Put: am.
MacArthur
indicates
either
I
or
Gen.
\RMS REDUCTION—A WORLD
thur Olmstead, Floyd Bassett, Ken­
times ride into the U. S. as con­
F
;that the war is useless or hopeless or neth Hellemn, Earl Hellemn, Oscar
HOPE
traband. Advice: Don't be a suck­
The test of a desire for peace is I that we should either expand it or Naue, Chester Roy, John Kunkle, Mrs.
er, declare them! Your swell time
the willingness to take rational means 1 get out and let the Commies take Donovan and the hostess Mrs. Lyons.
can have an ugly aftermath.
Guest Editorial by GARY PETERSON
to ward cultivating peace. By this over.
Members of the Altar Society of
JUVENILE
DELINQUENCY hits
This point of view also is reflected the St. Patricks Catholic church held
Senior in Mill City High School
standard, the demarche that has been
a
high
peak
this back-to-school
F At present a petition is circulating through the various districts, made by France, Britain, and the ' by 56 per cent of those polled in the a special meeting at the home of Mrs.
month. When the shock of the
latest
Gallup
survey
61
public
opin-
United
States
at
the
United
Nations
Mike Fink to complete plans for their
new discipline wears off, comes
«•king that the question of school consolidation he put to a vote. I his
a rash of teen-age rebellion. Out­
is the closest that propanents of consolidation have come in close to General Assembly must surely im­ i ion. Republicans agree overwhelm- bazaar and turkey dinner which will
j ingly with Senator Taft’s point of be held at the Rebekah hall, Monday
press mankind with its validity.
lets for this loss of freedom takes
twenty years.
The desire of humanity for peace view, that is, 65 per cent agree the evening, November 12. Present for
meeting of the
Mill City Parent Teachers association. Mill City
on many guises: truancy, school
At a ________
.... ..
vandalism, law-breaking. This is
school superintendent Vernon S. Todd and Burton Boroughs, high school and disarmament—for devotion of a war is “useless,” but 49 per cent of the meeting were Rose Schwindt, Ida
a situation bound to be on the
coach, gave that body a censensus of the T. C. Holly report on the school greater portion of its resources to ; the Democrats polled go along too. Free, Wilma Free, Loraine Free,
This shows an almost startling re­ Martha Jungwirth, Mary Volten,
rise after the first week of the
situation in the state of Oregon. It was shown through this report that beneficial works instead of slaughter
fall semester. School gets back to
high school students in Oregon were below the national average in three and destruction—is a desire too noble versal of public opoinion since the Gertrude Jungwirth, Anne Pietrok,
normal near month’s end.
of eight tested subjects, and above average in the remaining five, that the to be trifled with for selfish propa­ fateful decision was made to halt out­ Ruth Lyons and the hostess Mrs. Fink.
DOMESTIC STRIFE: Just about ¥
COOt per student per year was lower in a large high school, and that each ganda purposes, too legitimate to be right aggression in South Korea.
“Thanksgiving is Thanksgiving” is
Then, most of the Western world, the seasonable message chosen by
•todent had a greater choice of a curriculum in a high school of three long ignored, and too basic to remain
now a pall settles over the happy
as well as an overwhelming majority Rev. F. A. Feenstra, pastor of the
forever thwarted.
home. After a fling at the ocean
Jiundred.
The school of three hundred or more had a lower yearly cost than the
breezes and cool mountain eve­
A nation does not really court of U. N. representatives, lauded our Lyons Community Methodist church,
Part
of
the
swing
is
traceable
stand,
nings, with its romantic inter-
lowest small school, because fewer tearhers were needed to provide a larger peace or promote the atmosphere
for the 11 o’clock service next Sun­
lu ’es, husband and wife find
curriculum. Charts were shown which showed the number of students in necessary for arms reduction by vili­ to Red China’s entry, of course,
day, Nov. 18. “Why I Am Thankful
That made it, as Gen. MacArthur This Year” will be the theme for the
thenvelves thrown together again
tfee high schools of Mill City, Gates, and Detroit, along with the number of fying other nations as warmongers
in the confining routine of normal
teachers in earh, and the assets, bonding limit (thirteen percent under and imperialists, no matter how said a different kind of war. Part evening service. Sunday school meets
living. It begins with little things,
consolidation laws), outstanding bonds in circulation, and total bonding many signatures it may amass on so- of it stems from the efforts of politi­ with Mrs. John Prideaux, general sup­
petty grievances; is embellished
limit. minus the outstanding bonds.
called “peace” petitions or how much cal opponents of the administration erintendent and Mrs. Glenn Julian,
with the memory of the nice part­
It was pointed out that the only necessary school building at present it may talk of abolishing only one to saddle it with the blame for the children’s superintendent.
ner met this summer—and the
Cpl. John Toonib of McCord Field
Would be a high school, as Mill City high, which has the largest high school class of weapons. The “peace offen­ war. And part of it is sheer weari­
squabbles grow. Sometimes it
building. would be insufficient. The respective grade schools would con- sive” of Communist Russia has been ness with the inconclusive nature of visited over the week end with his
wears off — sometimes children
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Jim Toombs.
ginue in their present buildings for the time being.
unconvincing in these respects, but it the conflict.
are neglected, homes broken, and
Americans
historically
speaking
He
had
as
his
guest,
Shannon
Albright
definitely has called for affimative
¥
¥
¥
there
is violence in the horn".
P The question was brought up by Mr. Ituroughs, who read portions of measures to counteract the effect want to give a war, once they’re in­ who’s home is near DesMoines, Iowa.
This sad story is told many times
volved in it, everything they have, in
Mr. and Mrs. W. Long of Oregon
> thesis paper which he wrote for his degree, of the problem of traditions made on world thinking.
this month on police blotters.
and rivalries of the various communities. This would not constitute a
It is gratifying that those measures ! order to get it over with and get back City visited relatives in Lyons, Tues­
FINAL ISSUE
day
afternoon.
They
had
their
little
problem insofar as the students themselves are concerned, because various have been and are being taken. It home.
Mr. District Attorney heard
members of Gates, Detroit, and Mill City high schools student bodies have would not be open-eyed to expect I Unfortunately, the Korean war isn’t grand-daughter, Joyce Long with
Wednesdays on NBC
expressed a desire for consolidation.
that the proposals made in Paris will that kind of war. It isn’t that simple. them. Long is a nephew of Elmer
and
Amos
Hiatt.
Consolidation differs from unionization in that in consolidation one attain immediate, unquestioning ac­ It is a war designed to halt aggres­
school board consisting of five members would handle administration of ceptance. They are made as a basis sion, true, but it is also a war of con­
the one large district, while in unionization, there would be four hoards of for discussion and in a form suf­ tainment, a war fought to prevent a
education in control, competing with each other.
ficiently broad to allow for contri­ world-wide conflict, not to initiate it.
DR. MARK
In the face of these facts, it is clear that the students and taxpayers butions from many sources toward It is a war fought not against what
alike would he benefitted by the consolidation in improved educational filling in details.
most Americans consider their prim­
facilities, and in the taxpayer's pocketbook, A large, new high school would
Whether they will ever come to ary enemy, the Soviet Union, but a
be a source of pride to the residents of the canyon.
serious consideration in the current war fought at long range against
REGISTERED OPTOMETRIST
Residents of the consolidation districts of Aumsville and Turner now session is indeed the question—a ques­ stooges of the Soviet Union. To that
look with pride at their modern high school building, whereas they formerly tion whose answer lies largely with ! extent it is small consolation that it
Will be at his Mill City office in the Jenkins Building
were ashamed of the outrageous lack of facilities. They now have a modern, the Kremlin. Such a practical ap­ is destroying huge numbers of Red
Thursday afternoons 1 to 6 p.m.
well-equipped gymnasium while in the past they were forced to play in proach to arms control confronts aggressors and huge quantities of
Also
Thursday evenings by Appointment
poorly lighted gyms which had only a large wood stove for heat and cold Moscow with a dilemma of relaxing Soviet supplies. The real enemy still
showers. Fortunately the districts in this case are not faced with such its policestate secrecy or offering escapes the direct penalty of its ag­
HOME OFFICE: 313 W. FIRST. ALBANY
a problem. More power to those who are working toward this consolidation. more realistic proposals for disarm­ gression. That’s what makes the
Support them in any way you can.
Korean war so devilishly hard to
ament thnn it has presented.
Initially there is recognition that evaluate.
some degree at least of tacit under­
It helps some, we believe, to Ko
standing must be reached on current back a bit and determine what the war
1C the family next door were burned out of their home by fire, neighbor» divisive world issues before nations is NOT being fought for. It is not
would rush to help — to offer whatever was needed.
will be in a mood to reduce arms. | being fought for territory or raw 8
It ia hard to realize the effect» of a fire when the flame» were 10,000 This may reasonably include settle- materials or to satisfy an imperialistic S
mile» away. In South Korea, million» of helple»» civilian» — many of them ments in Austria and Germany as craving for authority over other 8
children — have »ufferd the conflagration» of war. Home» have been well as in Korea.
people. It isn’t being fought for oil
destroyed, all pow»e»»ion» lout, normal mean» of livelihood wiped out. At
I
Then it is recognized that in order or bauxite or steel capacity or uran­
i I
leant five million person» are homele»» refugees. The various government» to lay out an intelligent program of ium ore.
have pledged »upplie» to I N relief pools, hut »upplemental, individual aid arms reduction there must be reliable
It is being fought because a stand
Angelus •> Platt 0
is still necessary to meet the desperate need for clothing, for blankets, information as to what the arms situa­ had to be made somewhere against
for food.
tion is in various parts of the world. Soviet imperialism in action.
The General Federation of Women's club» ia sponsoring a Thanks­ And if nations are to trust the pledged
It is being fought to halt a specific
Traveleze 0
giving-season campaign to »end CARE food and textile packages from word of others to linvt arms, there act of naked aggression against a
0
Americans to Korean war victims. Funds are being solicited by Woman's must be international powers of in­ country whose political integrity was
0
club members in thi» city. The help CARE packages bring to the people spection to see that the promises are guaranteed by the United Nations.
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Boles-Aero
in many countries of Europe and Asia is well known. Nowhere is CARE observed.
It is being fought to provide an
more needed than in Korea today. No time could be more appropriate to
In making a proposal along these I object lesson to Communist imper­
extend that aid than now. as Americans prepare to give thanks for the
NEW AND USED
lines
the three nations present an in­ ialists everywhere—in Moscow, Peip­
abundance we enjoy — an abundance beyond the wildest dreams of the hungry
ing or Pyongyang—that open aggres­
teresting
parallel
to
*h-?
succes
ful
• nd cold men. women and children in South Korea.
sion does not pay.
ALL SIZES
America» on the »cene — members of the U. S. armed force» — had the efforts of the United States in the
It is a war fought to prevent the
compa»»ion, in the midst of their fighting, to try to ease the misery they Naval Disarmament Conference of repetition of aggression—in Indochina,
•aw. Stories have been told: How men of the Navy’s I'SS St. Paul provided 1921—plus one lesson learned fr< m Malaya. Indonesia. Japan, the Phillip-
PARTS AND SUPPLIES
food and clothing for an orphanage outnide Inchon harbor. How the Fifth the eventual evasion of that treaty pines. Yugoslavia and, yes, the United
Air Force e»tahlished an orphanage on Cheju Island for 100 children they i by Japan. First, the western powers States of America.
flew from Seoul. How Gia have shared what they could with Koreans offer what they could not have offered
0
It is a war fought to demonstrate
0
•long the road. But this is a job for civilian* to hear. A "Thanksgiving" a year or two ago—to give up on a that people who believe in freedom,
«
matching
basis
military
might
in
be
­
contribution to the General Federation's “CARE-FOR-KOREA” campaign
0
for themselves and others, are willing
«
means that American», safe at home, can help save the live» of the Korean ing under construction, not merely to band together and fight, if need be,
ALBANY
—
2
Miles
South
on
99E
0
people, whose tragedy it wa» to he caught in the blaze that threatens the on paper. Second, they insist that “a for their collective security and world
I
system of disclosure and verification
8tgHHHnHHtamagggHgBgngBBggggggggnK«gBBBHg«t»BPcgw«w«««Bj
free world.
successive stages woul I be an peace.
That’s what the fighting’s about in
sential part of the prog-*aai ”
This may or may not evoke a re­ Korea. That is why American troops
sponse of substance from the Soviet are fighting and dying in Korea along
Government. But at the least it with troops of other members of the
signifies that the initiative has been U. N. That’s why valiant efforts are
taken by the imaginative diplomacy of being made to contain the war and
the West. It means, moreover, that a to attain a truce of honor.
In these terms, the Korean war may
major contribution has been made in
thinking toward peace and toward a prove to be the most significant and
TO SAVE TIME AND MONEY FOR ALL
peaceful organization of world society important war in which Amercans
That concept, once grasped by men of have ever engaged anywhere.—From
THE
LOGGERS IN THE NORTH SANTIAM
constructive intent, will not be easily The Oregon Journal
relinquished. — From the Christian
AREA, I AM PUTTING A COMPLETE STOCK ■
The MILL CITY ENTERPRISE
MR.D.A.’S
CRIME
CALENDAR
LYONS
Editorial Comments
School Consolidation
I
LAHHIIHIAiS
The Victims Need "Care”
TRAILER HOMES
South Side Trailers
Al! Loggers
3 Miles East of Mill City
Dinners and Dancing
7 Days a Week From I p.m. to 3 a.m.
Special Rates
for Parties
of
Four or More
KEEP OREGON I
Science Monitor.
Every
that our
oldiers
to under-
stand what they are fighting for.
This is not at all hard to under­
stand when almost every day some
.dlinegrabber like Senator Taft
THE BOY'S SHOP
Headquarters for
BOVS WEARING APPAREI
2 to 16 Years
l)o Your Holiday Shopping
SEKVEI) FROM 4 P.M. TO 3 \ M
Orchestra Music for Dancing
Friday Saturday G* Sunday
OF LOGGING SUPPLIES IN AT BASSETT’S
WELDING SHOP AT LYONS, ORE.
BETWEEN FLOYD AND MYSELF, I AM
SI RE WE WILL BE ABLE TO GIVE YOU
BETTER SERVICE THAN YOU HAVE EVER
HAD BEFORE IN THIS AREA.
FRED GOOCH. JR.
Union Wire Rope
Tuffy Chokers
Esco Rigging
S kook urn Blocks
and Rigging
Gooch Logging Supply
b b
LAYAWAY ( HRISTMAS PLAN
Everything for the Logger'
DAY & NIGHT SERVICE
Sweet Home. Philomath
n t
339 N. High. SALEM
yes sti€r
Open Friday Night ’Til 9
Dynamite
Fire Equipment
Power Saws
Splicing and Socketing
a Specialty
Phone 1141
Roseburg
Phone 3-6656
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