The Mill City enterprise. (Mill City, Or.) 1949-1998, September 27, 1951, Page 2, Image 2

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    ; MILL C
ENTERPRISE
September 27, 1951
2—THE MILL CITY ENTERPRISE
I
MILL CITY. OREGON
DON PETERSON. Publisher
■mrjraiut
DR. MARK
I AHHI I ICrSE^i
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING: One insertion for 50c or three for $1.00.
The Enterprise will not be responsible for more than one incorrect in­
sertion. Errors in advertising should be reported immediately. Display
Advertising 45c column inch. Political Advertising 75c inch.
I
REGISTERED OPTOMETRIST
Will be at his Mill City office in the Jenkins Building
Thursday afternoons 1 to 6 p.m.
Also Thursday evenings by Appointment
NEWSPAPER
X
PUBLISHERS
HOME OFFICE: 313 W. FIRST. ALBANY
^ASSOCIATION
•APER THAT HAS NO ENEMIES II \S NO FRIENDS"
—George Putnam
Boy Scouts or Not?
The Hoy Scout population in the Mill < ity area is taking a beating.
These lads entered into the spirit of Scout work with the energy only our
youth have. Now these same young people find they are stalled. I he old
gag “Let George do it!” is working a hardship on the Boy Scouts. Whether
this kicking from pillar to post of the Scouts is by plan or neglect we do
not know. We do know it is time for a change!
It is important that there be a Scoutmaster and Scout committee—both
active. Boy Scout affairs have jogged along on a rocky road for an un­
reasonable length of time. Interest in the welfare of the Boy Scouts waxes
hot and cold. If there exists dashes of personalities among those respon­
sible for Scout work, it is time such things are forgot. Boy Scouts are
being hurt by this present lack of decisive action.
Boy Scouts are placed in the ridiculous position of having earned merit
badges, but cannot get them. There is no down-to-earth plan for Boy Scout
activity. Even the routine of meeting regularly has fallen by the wayside.
Unless a live Boy Scout troop gets going < ub Scouts will come to a standstill
also. The Cubs deserve something better than this. At present Boy Scouts
cannot advance further in their worthwhile program. Shall this state of
affairs continue?
ALL TYPES
BRICK
WORK
CLEANING
FLUES
GENERAL .MASON MORE
« I’llONE LYON'S 76
Box 195. MEHAMA
§
x x::xx:: x :: x x x x x :: x x :: x :: x x x x x x x x x x x :::: x :: x x x x X x
Sardine Creek Fire Ire
It’s a favorite pastime—this business of cussing out the other fellow.
'The Sardine Creek fire has stirred the ire of plenty of citizens. State and
federal forest services have been and even now are on the receiving end of
the lion’s share of such criticism. That’s a fact!
Those in the state and federal forest services must “take it and like it.
These men represent Oregon and the I .S.A.—they are your governments
agents on the scene, the I .S.A. Department of Interior hasn’t the money
Tor proper forestry roads and an effective force of trained foresters — a
peevish t’ongess so far has snapped I nde Sams purse shut on such items.
This same asinine stinginess is a disease of the Oregon legislature also.
So what if “college men" were confused about fighting the Sardine
creek fire, who wasn’t? The smoke and speed of the fire was terrific. So-
called “college men" aren’t super beings because of a few summers experience
in the forest service. Foresters must be trained and training takes time
and costs money. The co-operation shown the forest service by certain big
timber interests is a disgrace. Fire fighting is tiresome and dirty work.
The dousing of smoldering stump and snag fires in an area of some 9,000
acres of steep and almost inaccessible territory is no small task and cannot
be done over-night. A dozen men cannot do it—nor can two hundred.
There is not the slightest doubt in anyone's mind but that the Sardine
creek fire should have been mopped up entirely after the first rains and
before it “blew-up" the second time and swept towards Gates and Mill City.
The sixty-four dollar question is: why wasn't it? The answer is: there wasn't
time, men and equipment enough for such a project. I*ut your legislatures
under the magnifying glass for the answer regarding forest care in general.
If rain and winter weather finally does make the Sardine creek fire say
"Uncle" then there's the problem of future Sardine creek fires. Who, we
ask, will fell all those dying trees which will make beautiful torches for
bigger and fancier Sardine creek fires?
Those mute and denuded trees
should be felled, this we know. It is true many of the dead trees will be
lugged, but will all the snags in that vast burn, be felled? The last canyon
forest fire in 1919 gave a big boost in the way of old dry snags to the 19.11
version, the Sardine creek fire.
Forestry roads should now honey-comb the Sardine creek burn. All
snags should be felled and the work of re seeding done. Shall we “Let
George do it?”
|
The wedding cake cutting ceremony of Mr. and Mrs. John B. McClintock,
nee Inna Mae Nelson, who were married recently at the First Christian
church in Mill City. Bride’s parents are Mr. and Mrs. John Nelson of
Mill City.
(Photo courtesy The Statesman and Robert Veness)
a
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indication that Russia is ready to
come openly into the Korean struggle
and start a world war. Meanwhile,
evidence accumulates to show that
CONSTRl CTIVE CRITH ISM
Recurring fires in the Santiam short of such open participation there
Canyon area have had their repercus­ will be only defeat there for the Com­
sions in complaints of mismanage­ munists.
Allied authorities exude confidence
ment, as perhaps might be expected.
In any catastrophe, criticism is to be —based on specific military factors:
expected. And we are not attenpting
Terrain: United Nations forces are
to judge herewith its justification.
firmly planted—if not dug in—on the
What concerns us is keeping on strongest natural defense line they
doing the best job possible, if such have yet held in Korea.
has been done up to date, or in doing
Tanks: There are more American
better if slips there have been.
tanks in Korea than are likely to be
*
*
*
furnished by Russia or manned by
Two criticisms have been voiced— trained crews of Koreans or Chinese
first, that the guard was let down too —who have developed a distinct sense
much when the August sprinkles gave of claustrophobia through experience
firefighters a breather; second, that with napalmed tanks. Tanks are not
there has been insufficient supervi­ a decisive weapon under present con­
sion to make the best use of man­ ditions. being useful only in valleys.
Artillery: The UN’s massed fire­
power available.
To the first criticism, the only power is something new in warfare.
answer can be maybe. As it turned The greatest force of American
out. the fire did get away again and artillery in the last war was gathered
much more valuable timber destroyed. for the terrific fight on Okinawa.
In the meantime, whatever money was Twice as much is available in Korea
saved by reducing the fire-fighting and improvements have made it many
payroll has gone up in smoke many times more effective, guii-for-gun,
times over. While it is not true that than anything the Reds have used.
Airpower: UN planes dominate the
all men were withdrawn in August, it
appears probable that had more been air, with freedom to strike enemy
retained the loss would not have been troops and supply lines hundreds of
miles behind the front. The Com­
so heavy.
♦ ♦ ♦
1 munists have some fighter planes
To the second criticism, it would be that are reported superior to Ameri­
j difficult to find any specific answer. can jets but they have few skilled
The responsibility rests with the pilots and have been defeated time
forest services, but on so widespread after time even when they had larger
numbers This is due to better shoot­
an operation there must of necessity
be delegated a great deal of individual ing by American pilots and to superior
responsibility to a great many per­ training in group combat.
So far there is little indication that
sons. And many of them have car­
they have been able to establish air
ried out such responsibilities nobly.
bases in Korea. UN air forces, in­
The only real protection is in stop­ cluding close-support carrier planes,
ping fires before they get out of hand. cannot be outmatched by the 1,000
To that end, a co-ordinated effort is planes the Reds are reported to have
needed and when the present confla­ gathered in Manchuria. Of course if
gration
is history some serious Russia should come in openly the
thought needs be given in more de­ picture would change. But an answer
tailed planning along that line. Let | by strategic airpower, with the A-
the criticism be constructive. In the bomb always a potentiality, would
meantime, firefighters in the main then be immediately available.
: appear to be doing a creditable job.
A grim struggle may lie ahead.
—From The Statesman
W'e shy from rosy predictions. But
short of open Russian intervention, V
SHOWDOWN IN KOREA
the best information on Korea is that
A decision is due. Russia must |he military situation is good. Far
accept a severe setback in Korea or less good is the economic and political
make a much bigger investment in situation. Not only have millions of
that struggle.
Koreans been rendered destitute and
Sharp fighting which could be the homeless; the productive capacity of
prelude of a new offensive, use of the country is dangerously impaired.
tanks for the first time in months, Moreover, the South Koreans sharply
and the appearance of Caucasian oppose any proposals for leaving the
troops all these have caused uneasi­ nation divided. To prevent the Com­
ness on the American home front.
munists taking advanta'ge of these
But the jitters are definitely not in factors may prove a tougher long-
order. There is still little evidence range problem than the immedi­
that Moscow's new support of the ate military one. It deserves equal
Reds in Korea is very extensive or attention. — From Christian Science
very effective. There is even less Monitor.
Editorial Comment
I
g O
TRAILER HOMES
Angelus
Platt
Traveleze
Boles-Aero
NEW AND USED
ALL SIZES
SUPPLIES
South Side Trailers
ALBANY — 2 Miles South on 99E
ATTENTION!
WE HAVE PURCHASED THE EQUIPMENT AND BUSINESS
OF THE
Santiam Ready Mix Co.
AND SOLICIT YOUR PATRONAGE
Prompt Service in
Stayton-Mill City-Mt. Angel
Areas and Surrounding Communities — Call for Service at
STAYTON—541 Third Street
Sumpter Jewelry Bldg.
Phone 4174
MILL CITY
Call Stayton
Phone 4174
Marion County Redi Mix Co.
FRANCIS LULAY
AL BOCHSLER
IIIHIIIIillllllllllllllllllllllllllllN
.4 ire-fwe-i'-wt
From where I sit...
.Voir is the time to think
About a new ROOF or
Perhaps a Foundation-
HOME III II.DING SERVICE
HOOFING
REMODELING
Call or See
Valley Construction Co.
General Contractors
Phone 97
LYONS. ORE.
Joe Marsh
Skip Makes a Slip
Miss Gilbert, the teacher, was
telling me how Skip Law-on almost
went to -leep in her physics class.
She noticed him nodding and—
since they were discussing elec­
tricity said in a loud voice: “Now
maybe MR. LAWSON will explain
what electricity is." Skip started
up, looked around wildly, and
blurted out, “Gee! I used to know,
but I forgot."
"What a loss to science*” sighs
Miss Gilbert. "No one to this day
knows what electricity really is.
and here we have a genius who
could explain it—but forgot!"
CopyngSr.
From where I sit, I hope this
taught Skip that you're better off
if you admit you don't know all an­
swers. Some grownups haven't
learned that yet—like the one« who
are always telling other people
what'« best and what's right and
what's wrong. I like a temperate
glass of beer, myself, but if you
prefer buttermilk I won't argue.
I've seen too many "know-it-alls"
turn out to be wrong!
All Loggers
TO SAVE TIME AND MONEY FOR ALL
THE LOGGERS IN THE NORTH SANTIAM
AREA, I AM PUTTING A COMPLETE STOCK
OF LOGGING SUPPLIES IN AT BASSETT S
WELDING SHOP AT LYONS. ORE.
BETWEEN FLOYD AND MYSELF. I AM
SURE WE WILL BE ABLE TO GIVE YOU
BETTER SERVICE THAN YOU HAVE EVER
HAD BEFORE IN THIS AREA.
FRED GOOCH. JR.
Union Wire Rope
Tuffy Chokers
Esco Rigging
Skookum Blocks
and Rigging
Dynamite
Fire Equipment
Power Saws
Splicing and Socketing
a Specialty
Gooch Logging Supply
"Everything for the Logger"
DAY & NIGHT SERVICE
Sweet Home. Philomath
••’«nelUl
I mied Starrt F-rarrt Foundation
Roweburg
Phone 3-6656
I