The Mill City enterprise. (Mill City, Or.) 1949-1998, February 08, 1951, Page 2, Image 2

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    The MILL CITY ENTERPRISE
MILL CITY, OREGON
DOW PETER HON, publliiher
Entered aa
<>rid - c L ism matter November 10, 1944 at the post office at
Mill City, Oregon. under the Act of March 3, 1879.
LEAVING POLIO BEHIND
COMMUNITY AIMS THRU CO-OPERATION:
MICK IF BINES INVESTMENI 81 mil MABE THS POSSIBLE
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n>\ KHTIMIX.I One insertion for 5«»< or three for Sl.O c
The Enterprise will not be responsible for more than one Incorrect in­
sertion. Errors !■
r»i - s n r lhoul4 be reported immediately. Display
Advertising 45c column inch. Political Advertising 75c inch.
"THE PAPER THAT HAS NO ENEMIES HAS NO FRIENDS.”
—George Putnam.
The Meaning of Korea
Recently the President discussed Korea in these words:
"Korea has tremendous significance for the world. It means that free
nations, acting through the United Nations, are fighting together against
aggression.
"We understand the importance of this best if we look back into history.
If the democracies had stood up against the invasion of Manchuria in 1931,
or the attack on Ethiopia in 1935, or the seizure of Austria in 1938, if they
had stood together against aggression on those occasions as the United
Nations has done, the whole history of our time would have been different.
■’The principles for which we are fighting in Korea are right and just.
They re the foundations of collective security and of the future of free
nations. Korea is not only a country undergoing the torment of aggres­
sion; it is also a symbol. It stands for right and justice in the world against
oppression and slavery. The free world must always stand for these prin­
ciples—and we will stand with the free world.”
MEET Harry and Alice
at the
BRIDGE TAVERN
MEHAMA, OREGON
BRUCES Richfield Service
JUST WEST FRERES BUILDING SUPPLY — MILL CITY
WE GIVE UNITED TRADING STAMPS
Thomas (Tad) Dillon, seven-and-ahalfyear-old youngster of Los
Angeles, hopes contributions to the March of Dimes flow as wide and
deep as the water he's swimming through. Tad, an ex-respirator
patient, was treated in five West Coast hospitals, at a cost of $4,477.32
to the Los Angeles County Chapter of the National Foundation for
Infantile Paralysis. The National Foundation spent $20,000,000 in March
of Dimes funds last year and wound up operating its patient care
* program at a deficit. Help assure continued treatment for kids like
Tad—by giving generously to the 1951 March of Dimes this month.
MEHAMA
GATES
COMPLETE TIRE AND BATTERY SERVICE
Get your Anti-freeze Now!
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Come in and see our wide selec­
tions of 4$ RPM and 78 RPM
Populara, Old Timers. Classical,
and Semi-Classical Records.
We Have Some
Hard-To-Get Items
SPEED QUEEN IRON ETTE
" I -I INi.HOI SE Dl l I \E R LNQ1
SPl I D Ql EEN M \SHING M WHINE
PROCTOR AND TOASTMASTER TOASTERS
GENERAL ELECTRIC MIXERS
Just Received-RCA Record Players
PORTER & LAU
RADIOS — APPLIANCES — SERVICE
Mill City 188-1
Stayton 215
LICENSED
GARBAGE
SERVICE
$1.50 per month and up
Also serving Gates and Lyons
MILL CITY
DISPOSAL SERVICE
PHONE 2352
LEONARD HERMAN
By MRS. ALBERT MILLSAP
By JEAN ROBERTS
Called here by the sudden death
An especially interesting home ex­
tension meeting was held Friday aft­ of their father, Adam A. Shepherd,
ernoon in the Woman’s club house Thursday last week were Mrs. Mabie
•nd
with county extension agent Marjorie Hampton of Grangeville, Idaho; Paul
White demonstrating “accessories for Shepherd of Tensed, Idaho; Harold
Shepherd of Tillamook and William
clothes”.
Also discussed at the meeting was Shepherd of Mill City, and their fam-
FAMILY STYLE MEALS
the Homemaker festival which will be 1 ¡lies.
Mrs. Minnie Brotherton of Med-
held April 21 with all units invited to
Mr. and Mrs. “White” Johnston
attend and display a centerpiece on 'ford, sister of Mr. Shepherd, is at the
home of her son and family, Mr. and
the theme “My Community”.
Don’t Borrow—Subscribe Today!
Chairman of the festival committee Mrs. Henry Eccleston.
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Mr. and Mrs. Otto Wagner and
of this unit is Mrs. Eula Monroe
Chairman of the centerpiece committe Mr. and Mrs. Charles Hughs, all of
DR. MARK
; Portland were recent guests at the i
is Mrs. Gladys Cowdrey.
Winning prizes in the gift wrapping home of Mr. and Mrs. Clarance John-
contest, a side line of the extension | son.
Mr. and Mrs. Elton Brown and son I
work were Mrs. Florine Roten, Mrs.
REGISTERED OPTOMETRIST
Ann Blum, and Mrs. Winnie Branch. I of Mehama were Saturday visitors at
Hostess for the day were Mrs. Cowd­ the home of his grandparents, Mr. and
Will be at his Mil! City office in the Jenkins Building
1 Mrs. Ned Richards.
rey and Mrs. Dorothy Draper.
Thursday afternoons 1 to 6 p.m.
From Portland, at the home of Mrs.
A large group of young folks at­
Also
Thursday evenings by Appointment.
Anna
Nystrom,
over
the
weekend
tended the teen-age party last week
which is sponsored by the Mehama were her daughter, Mrs. Julia Stoffel,
HOME OFFICE: 818 W. FIRST. ALBANY
woman’s club. Bill Bickett, of Elk­ her granddaughter and son, Mrs. Ver­
horn, expert caller and instructor of na Hunziker and Miss Betty Ziler and
folk dances, was present to teach the Miss Madaleon Dixon. The younger ^^■aaaararw■wimi-ini w« iih i,i*amuimi>M«niiawuuiiwiuHiM‘iiii lunuii muiiiiiiimi hoiriivumninunmaaamnMMI^m
young people new routines. A num­ members of the party planned to form
ber of adults, Mr. and Mrs. Ken a skiing party Sunday.
A guest at the home of Mr. and
Golliet, Mrs. Frances McCarley, and
Mrs. Hazel Shields were onlookers. Mrs. Burrel Cole last week was Mrs.
Refreshments were served by the R. E. Stephenson of Grants Pass. Mr.
and Mrs. Cole accompanied by her
boys.
SALEM
mother, Mts. Minnie Everton spent
Andy Spriggs is reported ill and
141 N. Commercial St.
Phone 3-4534
Sunday
in
Molalla
at
the
homes
of
Mr.
confined to the Salem Memorial hos­
and
Mrs.
Sidney
Powers
and
Dr.
and
pital. Mrs. Spriggs, who has been in
Has Everything for Your
Mrs. J. B. Robertson. Mr. Cole is the
Washington for some time, has been brother of both Mrs. Powers and Mrs.
a recent Mehama visitor.
Robertson.
Mrs. Elmer Taylor is home and
E. V. Collins of Estacada was a
recovering from a trip to the hospital. Gates visitor one day last week, at
Furniture and Bookkeeping Supplies
The Jack Castle family has moved the home of his mother, Mrs. Lula
to Portland.
This decreases the Collins.
school population by three children.
Don Miley, superintendent of the
Their tent, located near the school local high school was called to Cali­
yard has been sold to a neighbor.
fornia, the last of the week by the
Mill City Hotel
Boarding House
t
lAUUI114 IM \
THE COMMERCIAL BOOK STORE
OFFICE NEEDS
From where 1 sit... /y Joe Marsh
BROADWAY AND MAIN STREET
Moe's Biggest East River Catch
Found Rose Hanging on Line
Blue Wins This "Hunt”
------------------------------------ By BILLY ROSE-------------------------------------
Motor Tune-ups
Brake Service
Expert Lubrication
SANTIAM MEMORIAL HOSPITAL.
MILL CITY STREET IMPROVEMENT.
LOCAL YOUTH RECREATION CENTER.
MILL CITY DIAL TELEPHONE SYSTEM.
MILL CITY PARK PUBLIC SWIMMING POOL.
ELIMINATION OF BANFIELD'S NIGHTMARE.
MILL CITY AREA SEWAGE DISPOSAL SYSTEM.
IMPROVE HIWAY 222 BETWEEN MILL CITY AND LYONS.
OBTAIN CANYON YEAR ’ROUND PAYROLL INDUSTRIES.
DETROIT, GATES, AND MILL CITY UNION HIGH SCHOOL.
news of the death of his sister’s four-
year-old son, who was struck by a car
and killed.
During Mileys’ absence
Mrs. Miley’s parents of Silverton are
in Gates at the Miley home.
Mr. and Mrs. Norman Garrison are
enlarging their cafe and variety store.
An addition is being added on the east
end of the building, with a floor space
of 16x35. It is planned to move the
cafe and fountain in the new addition,
which will provide more room for a
stock of hardware and other articles
in the store.
Gates friends of Mrs. C. Roshelm,
of Lyons will be glad to learn that
she has returned to her home from a
Salem hospital, where she was con­
fined for several days last week fol­
lowing a fall at her home. Mrs. Ros-
heim sustained a badly fractured el­
bow from the fall and it was neces­
sary to operate to remove pieces of
the shattered bone. Mrs. Rosheim is
the daughter of Mrs. Lula Collins.
Mr. and Mrs. Fount Paul and Mr.
and Mrs. Tex Allen drove to Salem
one night last week where they en­
joyed an evening of ice skating.
As Others See Us
A h a matter of policy, the Soviet government does everything possible
to create fear, distrust and hatred of America among its people. Those who
would like an insight into Home of the techniques pursued would do well
to read an article by ¡.ouis J. Herman, a specialist in Russian propaganda,
called “America Through the Kremlin's Eyes.”
Tn the field of sweeping generalities, Mr. Herman quotes this picture of
America from a piece of the New Times, a Soviet weekly: “A handful of
plutocrats wallow in wealth and enjoy unlimited power, while tens of millions
of ordinary people suffer privation and oppression ... In their crusade
against all progressive-minded Americans, the monopolists are out to turn
the United States into a land of police bludgeons and torture chambers.”
The American press—which, according to the official Soviet view, is
almost TOO per cent pro-fascist and anti-democratic—naturally comes in for
its full share of attention. The heaviest bombardment falls on publications
of wide circulation, such as Time and Newsweek, and the New York Times
and Herald Tribune. The following view of goings on at the National Press
Club in Washington is offered: “Here, over a glass of whiskey, around the
card or billiard tables, rumors and insinuations are born, domestic and world
news is manufactured, vicious, lying stories are penned at the war-mongers*
orders.”
How many Russians believe it no one knows. But the fact is that very
few of them have access to any other information.
February 8, 1951
2—THE MILL CITY ENTERPRISE
Among the doodads on my desk is an old piece of string wrapped
around a wooden spool, and people who come to my office often quiz
me about it. My rough, ready and routine answer is: I'm fond of that bit
of string because, thanks to it, my business address is Sixth Avenue
instead of Davy Jones's Locker.
But let me crank the reel back 44 years and give it to you—as my
Aunt Frieda would put it—"in sequins.” . . .
The scene I remember most vivid­
ly on the East Side is the dock
near the Fulton Fish Market where
we used to go swimming on sum­
mer days when
school was out and
the tide was in.
And the water­
front character
who usually takes
stage center in my
memory is a little
ragbag of a man
we called Crazy
Moe who spent
most of his days
Billy Rose
spool-fishing over
the edge of the pier.
We often pointed out to this in-
compleat angler tha he was wast-
ing his time that no self-respecting
flounder would be caught sauteed
in the polluted waters of the East
River—but Crazy Moe paid no at­
tention to us. His answer, when he
bothered to answer at all, was that
he didn't much care about catching
anything—he just liked to fish. And
as nearly as we could tell, he never
even took ths trouble to bait his
hook.
•
•
•
ONE DAT A BOY na
the most promising juvenile delin­
quent on Avenue A, swiped a mack­
erel from a fish stand, dove off the
dock when Moe wasn't looking and
hooked the fish onto his line. And
when the fetched one began to pull
in his “catch," his hands shook
so violently that the fish looked
•live
Before be coaJJ ffl
It the
btunr tne tf Ibt 4wj
t-ebked tbi mo,berei out tf bis
bathed its beed tff utlb
t
Cresy .Me« c*r>«J «1
w fee fite mettles —mJ •< uest'l
bee ease bi t m/»J le Iteff e«J
••em« tbe fisb, be n>>» «>mZ«J It
ibeet tbe goor ibetg both.
A«»J s«J
Thers was another day when this
same Terry decided it was time I
learned how to swim, and when I
tried to ward him off with the wily
dialectics of a seven-year-old he
began calling me “sissy” and
"yella belly." Finally, realizing
there was no way to dodge the
dunking. I stripped down to my
shorts. Terry and another kid
grabbed hold of me, gave me a cou­
ple of hammock swings and pitched
me into the river. I landed ker-
splash between a grapefruit rind
and a floating bottle, and water be­
gan rushing into me from every I
opening.
•
•
Cappy Miller’s coon dogs—ex­
cept for one of them. Old Blue—are
about the finest hounds in the
county. Blue's too friendly and
easy-going to care much about
hunting. He doesn’t act the way we
think a good dog should, so we fig­
ured he'd never amount to much.
But a fellow comes around Sat­
urday looking for a good dog to
photograph for some advertising.
And the dog he picks is Blue! Says
Blue’s happy, friendly face is just
the one to attract people's atten­
tion. So Cappy gets more money
for that picture than his other
dogs will ever take in hunt prizes.
From where I sit, that should
teach us not to look down on hu­
man». when they act differently
than we think they should. For in­
stance, maybe you think tea goes
best with food. O.K.—but don't
size up wrong the man who enjoys
a bottle of beer at mealtime.
Like Blue, I guess we’re all "dif­
ferent” in one way or another —
but that doesn’t mean we don’t
have our good points, too!
Copyright. 1951.I'nited States Breuers Foundation
Rebuild Bodies
•
AS I WAS GOING down for the
second time I somehow got tangled
up in a bit of string, and when my
head broke water I saw Crazy Moe
standing on the dock hauling in his
second fish—me, and I was darned
near as dead as the first one. The
line, of course, wasn't strong enough
to do more than keep me afloat, but
it gave Terry a chance to dive in
and pull me over to the ladder.
After I had recovered breath
and bravado, I asked Crazy Moe
to let me have his fishing line
for a keepsake, and when he
demurred 1 bribed it away from
him with what was an important
piece of money in those days—
a new Liberty Head nickel.
Today, many decades and chins
later, the piece of string occupies
a prominent place among the me­
mentos on my desk—sort of a mute
reminder of the time when my life
hung by a hair. And my favorite
mermaid who. of course, knows this
story says it explains why I married
her.
“You wanted a swimmer in the
family.” says Eleanor, "because the
next time they throw you in. there
may not bo a Crazy Moe hanging
around.”
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On All Models and Makes
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14 Years Experience
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MILL CITY