The Mill City enterprise. (Mill City, Or.) 1949-1998, July 13, 1950, Page 6, Image 6

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    The MILL CITY ENTERPRISE
their guests from San Francisco and
i Woodland, Calif., Mr. and Mrs. Jack
I Hansen and two daughters and Mel-
| vin Millsap were at the home of Mr.
, and Mrs. Edmund Klecker In Stayton
’ the fourth.
A card received by your corres­
pondent from Mr. and Mrs. Hollis
Tumidge and daughter Carolyn, who
are motoring south to Mexico, indi-
I cates they are experiencing some
warm weather. They reported 112
1 degrees in Prescott, Arizona “and no
shade.” Later in the day the temper­
ature registered 135. “Even Hollis is
hitting the cold pop stands.”
MILL CITY, OREGON
DON PETERSON. Publisher
JAMES SMITH Editor
Entered as xecond-claxa matter November 10. 1844 at the poet office at
Mill City, Oregon, under the Act of March 3. 187,
<1. y»sll l,:i» M»V 1HTISIM.I One hi-. rib n for
or three for 11.00.
The Enterprise will not be reeponslble for more than on»- incorrect In­
__
sertion. Errors 111 advertising should bo reported in mmHaielr. Display
Display
¿/gcary
r'/S.
il
Advertising 45c column inch. Political Advertising 75c inch.
NEWIPAPU
DITORIAL
PUBLISHtX
ASSOCIATION
"THE PAPER THAT HAS NO ENEMIES HAS NO FRIENDS.”
Minority Government
Statistics show that not one of the presidents of the United States
elected In the twentieth century was supported by a majority of eligible
voters.
The indifference which exists on the national level is duplicated on
the local level.
Splendid as was the turnout here In the recent school election, for
example, many citizens failed to vote. Some of these may have wanted
to vote but couldn't due to several reasons.
The fact remains that 187 votes does not represent a majority of
eligible voters living In Mill City. Some couldn't vote because they were
working swing shifts that made voting highly Inconvenient If not impossible.
Whatever way these people may have voted, we don’t know. But
the fact they didn't vote weakens the power of the present board. There
Is a solution for this state of affairs under the state legal code for school
elections. Districts of class 2 status can vote to hold their uchool elections
from two to seven instead of just one hour.
Under section 111-907 of the Oregon code, “Districts of the second
«•la.» muy hold election for a director in the manner provided in this act
for holding elections In districts of the first class, when authorized so to
do by a majority vote of the legal voters present at any legally called
school meeting.”
Districts of the first class under the act “shall elect directors for
each district on the day of the annual school meeting to serve as provided
by law, and such election shall be from 2 p.m. to 7 p.m.
Enough voters fall to vote In this country without any extra barriers
being placed lietwren the citizen and his duty of approving or disapproving
of the government under which he lives.
Thomas Housing Project
LOTS, and HOMES FOR SALE
IF YOU’RE A G.L, SEE
DEVIL S LAKE
TZeyatta
JULY 15 & 16-DELAKE. ORE
Thrill to exciting inboard and outboard boat races,
water »hang, sailboat races and a lovely .vqua ballet.
Tbere'll be a parade of beautiful float, on the water
a* well .»• a b*g street parade, and cwosuhss Foe Hte
twwe of your life, make this a must.
Reddy Kilowatt
N
Open Friday
Afternoons
McEWAN
PHOTO SHOP
Phone 2243
MILL CITY
DR. MARK
EAHHERICESE*
REGISTERED OPTOMETRIST
Will be at his Mill City office in the Jenkins Building
Thursday afternoons 1 to 6 p.m.
Also Thursday evenings by Appointment.
,----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
HOME OFFICE: 813 W. FIRST, ALBANY'
—1< pnn'.eJ from the Louisville “Courier-Journal
GATES
Bud Oliver, all of Corvallis spent the
holidays with their parents, Mr. and
Mrs. Clyde Oliver.
Mr. and Mrs. William Athey and
By MRS ALBERT MILLSAP
Mr. and Mrs. Fred Gooch, after an four daughters and Mr. and. Mrs
absence of a number of yeai-s while Cecil Haun and three children spent
they resided in Lyons, have purchased the fourth at Breitenbush hot springs.
the former Henry Kaplinger property
Mrs. George Mielke and daughter
between Gates and Mill City, in Linn were at the home of her sister, Mrs.
coun,ty where they will make their Keith Taylor, In Walport over the
fourth.
home.
Guests over the holidays at the Miss June Mitchell accompanied Mr.
home of Mr. and Mrs. Clarence John­ and Mrs. Norman Garrison on a
son were Mr. and Mrs. Wesley Wise camping trip to the Metolius, Bend
(Florence Carroysot) of Portland, and Suttle lakes.
Mr. and Mrs. Roy Taylor, of Browns­ Among those attending the rodeo
ville, Reynold Hesseman of Browns at St. Paul were Mr. and Mrs. Jess
ville, Mabie Hesseman of Salem and Moses and Mr. and Mrs. Joe Harden
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Hughes of Port­ and family.
land. A picnic dinner was held the Mr. and Mrs. Wilson Park and three
fourth complimenting the guests children left early Saturday morning
Oithers present were Mr. and Mrs for Rockaway Beach where they
Robert Levon, Mr. and Mrs. Glen spent the night. Sunday they attended
Henness, Royal Johnson and Mrs. the rodeo at St. Paul.
Gwen Schaer and family.
Mr. and Mrs. Glen Hearing, Mr. and
Mr. and Mrs. Layton Gosnell and Mis. Oswald Hirte and Mr. and Mrs.
small son, Larry Lee, of Roseburg Wilson Park and the children of the
were guests at the home of Mrs three families spent the Fourth pic­
Gosnell's mother, Mrs. Laura Joaquin nicking at Moore's Grove.
for the past week.
Mr. and Mrs. A. T. Barnhardt and
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Edwards of I two children motored to Newport over
Salem, accompanied by Mrs. Ed­ the holidays. They enjoyed a deep sea
ward’s sister, Mrs. Lenora Follet of fishing trip. It is reported they had
Alsea, were at the home of Mr. and I very good luck.
Mrs. Norman Garrison Saturday. Mr. and Mrs. George McBride Jr.,
Mr. and Mrs. C. J. Montag of Port­ Mr. and Mrs. N. Masoner and family
land were Saturday visitors here. The and Mr. and Mrs. F. R Hutchison
C. J. Montag and Sons Construction were seen at the rodeo in St Paul.
Co. was once active in construction
Holiday guests at the home of Mr.
work here.
and Mrs. Ray Lord were Mr. and
Mr. and Mrs. Riley Champ have Mrs. S. Snyder and Mr. and Mrs. Ber­
returned home from an extended nard Kohler and son Garry all from
Salem. Garry remained at the home
trip to Southern California.
Miss Jean Oliver of Salem, Mr. and of his grandparents for a longer vLsit.
Mrs. Bob Oliver and daughter and
Mr. and Mrs. Albert Millsap and
1
Ádvw tidtment
From where I sit... //Joe Marsh
There it Was—
Right in The Middle!
Easy Roberta mowed his lawn
early last Saturday. Then he sat
on the porch, and watched Handy
Peterson cutting hit grass.
The Roberts’ property and the
Peterson’s border each other —
with no hedge or fence between
them. So, when Easy notices Handy
had left about a four-foot strip
unmowed along the boundary, he
walks over and asks why.
“That’s your land,’’ says Handy.
“Mine ends here. See, it lines up
with that oak tree across the
road!” Easy didn’t think so, so
they went up and down looking for
The Other Side of the Curtain
At Last Disclosed This Secret
I
the surveyor’s marker. Where did
they find it? Right in the middle
of their “no man’s land! ”
Well, they both grin and take
turns finishing the job and then re*
treat to Easy’s for a friendly glass
of beer together. From where I sit,
a little searching around for the
truth of the matter often ahowa
that the other fellow is as much
right as you are—at which point
the whole thing doesn't seem as
important anyway.
Copyright, 19S0, United States Brewers Foundation
Richfield Station
Open Under
New Management
GOODYEAR ACCESSORIES:
TIRES
BATTERY CABLES
BATTERIES
RADLATOR HOSE
FAN BELTS
SPARK PLUGS
BROADWAY AND MAIN STREET
___ __________________ By BILLY ROSE-----------------------------
"There'll be oceans of
fun at the ...
I never saw a purple cow,
I never hope to see one;
But I can tell you now,
I'd rather see than be one!—G.B
The secret of success m conversa­
tion is to be able to disagree without
being disagreeable.
George Putnam.
In spite of development* in the atomic field, we think that man's real
triumph so far during the twentieth century Is his conquest of the air.
Too often, we take for granted the dally flights from continent to con-
tinent or coast to coast. No longer does an ordinary airplane soaring
overhead create much excitement.
As a progressive community, Mill City must join in the spirit of th«*
air age. Somewhat off the direct runs of major airlines, we seldom have
the opportunity to view the majesty of man-made birds In flight. No nearby
military airfield provides us with the spectacle of hundreds of planes in
simultaneous flight.
Sunday’s air show gives us a chance to have our peaceful canyon air
filled with the hum and din of hundreds of planes.
Some of us may be startled by such a din. Our canyon Is so peaceful
on most Sunday mornings, But for a day perhaps we can glimpse at a
future that could be ours. The air age has been too long in reaching
Mill City.
If our community and our canyon Is to grow and prosper, we must
grow and proeper In the air age. The sooner we all support the develop­
ment of the llavln airfield and encourage private flying, the sooner the day
will come when aviation will lie an everyday part of the life of the
community.
July 13, 1IW>
3—THE MILL CITY ENTERPRISE
WISHFUL THINKING
i
*
Frank's Richfield Service
On an October morning in 1903, in a village not far from La
Rochelle in eastern France, a young priest paled as he listened to
FRANK BARNEY
his first confession.
"Yesterday afternoon,” he heard the penitent on the other side of
the curtain say. "I met a stange girl on the dirt road that runs by the ■
We Give United Trading Stamps
pond. When 1 tried to make friends with her, she laughed at me. and
I got so mad I picked up a stone and hit her to make her stop laughing
' i 'III UliWWBLWLiniMliOUll
She fell down, and when I yelled and she didn't move I got scared and
buried her beside some bushes."
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Father Antoine recognized the
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voice as that of a 15-year-old who years and the skull had been 0
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was known In the
crushed by some heavy object.
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village as “t h e
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Bound by his vows, Father An-
0
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story teller"—a boy
toine could say nothing, and for 0
a
who was always
the next 40 years the secret re- 0 0
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talking about his
mained with him.
0
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daydreams as if
fi
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they had actually
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THE YEARS of the German oc- fi
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happened
cupation were difficult ones for fi 0
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With $10.00 or More Order
Even though he
those who lived in the La Rochelle 0
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didn't know wheth-
district, but many of the villagers 0 fi
5 Lbs Sugar
er the confession
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did what they could for the resis­ fi
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was fact or fiction,
fi
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movement
—
and
not
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the priest imposed Billy Rose
among them was the priest, now in fi
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severe
most
the
his late 60 s. And when liberation fi fi Bl.I E BEI.I SHOESTRING POTATOI «.
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2 for «25 M
penance and in addition ordered finally came, a great celebration 0
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the boy to visit him every day after was arranged with Father Antoine 0
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fi M NMIINl MIREDDED WHEAT
school for a friendly talk.
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as the guest of honor.
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A few weeks later. Father Antoine
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After the dinner there was a
0 SEA I’RIDl TIXt EIGHT MEAT
was almost certain the "crime
good deol of reminiscing among
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was an hallucination. For one thing,
0
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the sclerous of the underground,
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there had been no report of a miss­
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but when someone usbed the
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ing person in the district and. for
priest to tell of bis own odien-
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another, the boy's descriptions of
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tores. he smiled end declined,
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the murder grew more and more
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SPAGHETTI
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—colling the es entful is almost
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ONE AFTERNOON he finally ad­
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on eseryday occurrence. As a
IG \ PORK A BEANS
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mitted to the priest that his story
mutter of foct, the first confes­
was a fabrication. “I did meet a
sion I es er heard u as that of a
I«. 1 TOILET TISSUE
o
* for
girl," he said, “and she got me so
murderer "
angry that I wanted to kill her But
Then, remembering his vows.
I never touched her, and after­ Father Antoine apologized for his
.16
wards I got all mixed up about off-guard remark, and despite the
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what I wanted to do and what I urging of the guests would say no
SI NXY MORN COFFEE. lb.
.65
I
really did "
more.
"I inspected os much ell
Later that evening a delegation
0
along," sesd Fother Antoine, "but
0
of underground workers from other
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I must admit I was sbocbed at
districts joined the celebration and
0
BEST FOOD MAYONNAISE
pt.
,41
at.
first. Yon see. you u ere the first
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one of them, a colonel in the
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person a bo bod eier confessed
Maquis, was asked to say a few
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to me."
0
words
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“Meeting Father Antoine tonight
Two years later, the boy's family
0
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moved to Parts and the priest all is a great pleasure." he said to the
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ALBERT TOMAN.
Prop.
but forgot the incident—until a new gathering, “and not only because
%r»s V S rr v
’
___________
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WE DELIVER
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paved road w as laid alongside the of his war record. Although he
0
old dirt one Under a bush near the doesn't remember my name or
0
Open Week Days from 8 A..M. to 7:S0 p.M.
pound was found the decomposed face. I knew him when I was a boy
Sundays 9 A.M. to 6 P.M
body of a girl, and the coroner testi­ —as a matter of fact. I was the first ■
3
fied it had been there about two person who ever confessed to him." ■ubUbaB OBBCI5O nwaaBBOBBUonBo soaoo oo o »unnawncninnaDKRa 3
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