The Hood River glacier. (Hood River, Or.) 1889-1933, December 18, 1924, Image 11

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HOOD RIVER GLACIER. THURSDAY, DECEMBER 18, 1924
REPORT GIVES DATA
ON TUBER CULTURE
agricul
Require-
ia on a
For Mother’s Linen
Closet — Bath Towels —
prettily colored and
worked.
The M. E, ladles will hold a Christ­
mas bake sale Saturday. December 20
at the Mt. Hood Mt«t Market.
Eocene Coal Oil stops smoking ant!
smelling oil stoves.
In bulk at Fram
qp-
*
m29lf
I deliver sweet cider in gallon lota or
by the barrel.
Walter Welle.
Phone
*728-
ntttf
Eyee scientifically examined by H. L.
Haabrouck, Optometrist Heilbronner
BWg.
ffiu
Highest cash price paid lor your used
furniture, stove« and ruga. Call McClain
at E. A. Frans Co.
«20ft
Trunks, Bags, S uteases, Large sa-
aortment, reasonably priced.
Kelly
Hr<*.Co. ~
.mlbti
See “Hood River Nap” at the poul­
try show Friday and Saturday.
Ernest Colby la at a hospital at
The Dalles recovering from a painful
operation.
Help put Hood River on the ath­
letic map by attending the Basketball
benefit dance Christinas uight.
In California and other districts
such as Hood River where land val­
ues are relatively high it is usually
found that other vegetableu and fruit
tend to crowd out potatoes. Thus in
California the potato acreage is de­
creasing and ia now largely coulined
to areas where production per acre
la very high, such as the peat soils
around Stockton.
It is presumed therefore that the
acreage of potatoes in this county
will not increase very much in the
future, perhaps not at all. The pres­
ent acreage ia nearly all around Park-
dale.
Yields per Acre: The average yield
per acre of all the potatoes In the
county la slightly leas than 100 sacks
but the yield of the commercial grow­
ers will average about 100 Hacks per
acre and some as high as 200 sacks.
Coat of Production : For the com­
mercial grower the costs of produc­
tion <re high. These costs vary great­
ly with different conditions, such as
the preceding crop, the yield obtained,
price of aeed, price of land, etc. It in
impossible, therefore, to set any defln­
ite figure aa to the coat of production.
The following figures are given hh h
guide, and indicate the fact that pota­
toes are expensive crops to grow.
The figures are baaed on a yield of
100 sacks per acre.
With larger
yields some of the expense items will
increase, others remaining stationary.
Growing Costa:
Plowing, >3 50;
discing and harrowing. >3.25: seed,
2,000 pounds, >30; planting, >0; cut­
ting and treating seed. >5; cultivating.
>1.25; irrigating, (labor) >3.00; water
coat, >3.50; hoeing, >3; total, >58.
Harvesting Costa:
Digging and
picking, >20; sacks. *12; sorting, >10;
hauling, >3; total, *45.
Total cost, *103.
«
Railroad Rates: The large propor­
tion of Oregon potatoes shipped from
the state goes to California aa freight
rates to most other places are pro­
hibitive.
In most years Portland
uses as many potatoes from Yakima
as from Oregon.
Yakima growers
usually refuse to sell at very low
prices; accordingly the iiercvntage of
Yakima potatoes used in Portland ia
Increasing and may be expected to
increase in the future, leaving Oregon
growers more and more dependent on
California pointa.
■
The railroad rates from Parkdale
are as follows :
Parkdale to Hau
Francisco, combination rail and water,
45% cents per 100; Parkdale to Han
Francisco, aU rail. 52% cents per 100 ;
Parkdale to Portland, all rail, 21
cents per 100. The all rail rate to
Han Francisco from Yakima ia 49%
cents; the all rail rate to Han Fran
cisco from Portland, 35% cents, and
to Han Francisco from Eugene, 48
The Grange store is having abelves
painted and interior decorated, in
preparations for greeting Yuletide
patrons next week.
Walter Hebert, sales manager of
the Yakima Fruitgrowers Association,
was here last Saturday to see Wayne
M. French, of the firm of Simon,
Hhuttleworth A French.
»“Rev. Gabriel Sykes and
came up from Portland
with Dr. and Mrs. George Christmas
to Hee their daughter, Mra. Jamea
Wilson, and family.
See "Hood River Nap” at the poul­
try show Friday and Saturday.
Say, Folks, think over your needs
for Christmas flowers. You want the
flowers. I need the money. The rest
don't amount to nothing.
Levity
aside, we have a fine lot' of special
that yoa need fqr your Christmas Festivities.
Sunkist Oranges - California’s Finest
Walnuts - Almonds - Filberts
Brazils - Peanuts
Dates - Figs - Cluster Raisins
Glace Fruit - Candied Cherries and
Pineapple - Dipping Chocolate
Mince Meat - Plum Pudding
Fruit Cake - Fresh Eastern Oylers
Fresh Vegetables
LEMS SERVE YOU
MAYOR and COMMON COUNCIL
GIVE THEM PICTURES
of Cascade Scenic Views
I
What more appropriate Christmas present can you
think of, not only for local friends but as well for the
relative or friend than some of the handsome en­
largements of our superb mountains, streams and forests?
Were ever landscapes tnore alluring or impressive
than ours of the mid-Columbia ?
RECORD BIG FEMALE
COUGAR IS TRAPPED
50 cents per hundred. Parkdale grow­
ers are thus on nearly even basis with
Yakima, Bend and southern Willam­
ette valley but are handicapped 17
cents per hundred as compared with
the growers of the northern Willam­
ette valley. Klamath county ia rapid­
ly Increasing its potato acreage and
the rate from Klamath Falls is about
the same aa from Portland.
Varieties Grown:
At present the
varieties grown are aa follows: Net­
ted Gem, 7ft per cent : Burbanks, 20
per cent, and Early Rose. 5 per cent.
Possibility of Future Markets : The
average price to grower over a 10-
year period la >1 per hundred for
potatoes. There ia no way of show­
ing whether thia will be an Index of
future prices to lie expected but it la
the only guide we have. With higher
coat of production it ia possible that
the prices will average slightly higher
than this during the next 10 years.
Columbia river points would take
about four carloads of Early Ohio or
Bliss Triumph potatoes for seed if
some district were producing a reli­
able aeed potato of these varieties
If a satisfactory seed market can be
developed It is a better market out­
look than table stock because seed is
needed no matter what the price for
commercial potatoes.
Burbanks have a constant aeed mar
ket in California. It ia proliable that
the acreage of potatoes tn California
will increase and some decrease may
be expected. Population on the coast
in increasing rapidly.
From these
facts It may be expected that prices
for table stock potatoes will average
slightly higher in Oregon than in the
middle west.
II. Conclusions and Recommeoda
tiona:
1. We urge growers to stay with
standard varieties such aa those now
grown rather than to experiment with
new or little known varieties.
2. We urge a consideration of the
seed market by a few growers.
3. The state potato grading law
has been beneficial to the grower
from the standpoint of protecting
For Dad—A stunning
Tie or Cuff Buttons.
everybody.
Sweater* for the whole
A mechanical train for
sonny and a doll for sis*
ter.
Wr uiislf ynu all the Äernrat of Œhrwtmas (Srertimga
and trust you will tjaw a i appy and ÇrnspmntB Nrm fear.
up of the seed we now have by select­
ing vigorous high yielding hills in the
field.
8. Heavy application of fertilizer
will ordinarily give larger returns on
land already rich than they will on
poor, low yielding land.
If land Ls
run down in fertility it will tie cheap­
er and it will pay better to tiuiid It
up by growing and plowing under
clover than to try to build It up by
adding commercial fertiliser. Potato
yields may be increased by fertiliser
on lands already producing good crops.
Work by the Hood River Experi­
ment Station and practical field tiats
by growers both Indicate that nitro­
gen, phosphoric acid and sulphur are
of value In securing maximum yield.
Potash lias so far not increased
yields. The use of nitrogen in the
form of sulphate of ammonia la fa*
vored liecauae of the presence of solu­
ble sulphur. Likewise superphosphate
is valuable because it also has soluble
Hulphur.
We recommend the following fer­
tiliser formula : 1,000 pounds super­
phosphate and 400 pounds sulphate of
ammonia.
Thia formula has been
used In amounts ranging from 700 to
2,800 pounds per acre.
The use of
1,000 pounds per acre may he consid­
ered to be • conservative afipllcatlon.
A safe means of application la by
drilling in with the seed.
ZERO TUESDAY NIGHT
A minimum temperature of aero
was reported for Tuesday night by
J. H. Jeffrey, Barrett federal weather
observer.
With the two Inches of
line snow covering the highways,
ground to a fine, powdery duet, mo­
tor traffic was In no wise hindered.
Winds Tuesday night drifted the
deeper mow between here and Port­
land. and considerable trouble waa
experiencd by motoriata negotiating
the highway.
The cold weather, growers say, will
cauae no damage to fruit trees.
The storm, which struck Oregon
Sunday night was very peculiar. It
came from the northwest, and at day­
break Monday Portland had aeveral
inches of enow. The fall extended as
far eaat as Cascade Ixicka. At Crown
Point 10 inches of snow were report­
ed.
At midnight Monday the wind
switched to the east here, and the
temperature began to drop steadily.
By noon Tuesday It had reached 12
above aero.
aero, . About two Inches of
snow prevailed Monday night.
WEDDINGS
News waa received here last week
of the wedding In Portland Thuraday
of Keltaie Devin, of Mount Hood, and
Miss Florence Paulson. Mr. and Mrs.
J. C. Devin, parents of the young
man, did not know of the matri­
monial intentions of their aon until a
telegram wbh received announcing the
event,
Young Mr. Devin is associated with
bls father in a ranch place near Mt.
Hood.
Year before last they con­
structed a community hall on their
place, located on the Loop highway.
It haa become one of the moat popu­
lar places
In
the
mid-Columbla.
Young Mr. Devin was a former stu­
dent of Oregon Agricultural College.
Mra. Devin, who la a memlietv of
the staff of a large department store,
will remain in the city nntil the hol-
Idaya.
Local frienda of the young
couple are planning an interesting
charivari when they arrive together
at their Mount Hood home.
Pictures are in black or white or natural colors in oils.
C. S. REEVES
Hand embroidered
Dove gowns made of
high grade Nainsook for
the ladies.
7. A high yielding crop cannot be
produced if th* need la very badly
diseased
Home attention must be
paid to the aeed therefore. We favor
importing to the district nothing but
certified aeed to guard against the
See “Hood River Nap” at the poul
possible fmportatkm of hadly diseased
potatoes. Ws Also urge the build I ng try ahow Friday and Saturday.
1STMAS