The Hood River glacier. (Hood River, Or.) 1889-1933, December 11, 1924, Image 1

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VOL. XXXVI
flOOD KI VER. OREGON. THURSDAY, DECEMBER 11, 1924
Chocolates for Christinas
The Christmas Gift that is new with
each New Victor Record
A Christmas Vicrola
will make the World’s
Most Famous Artists
live for you.
Anywhere - Anytime
Give Victor Records
For Christmas
Johston’s Chocolates
Saylor’s Chocolates
Liggett’s Chocolates
Cigars for Christinas—Chancellor * Van Dyke - Robe. Bums
Muriel and White Owls - in Xmas holes of 25
Imported Mahjongg Sets - >5.00 and up
KRESSE DRUG CO. The
Store
TOMORROW MORNING
1
And They Lived Happy
Ever After
How would you feel if your valuables were
lost, stolen or destroyed by fire tonight?
Why gamble when the cost of absolute
protection is trifling?
Rent Your Safe Deposit Box Today
$2.50 per year
If you -ever try^to write fifty-two ad­
vertisements a year for twenty years or
more, and make an effort to have all of
them different and some of them Inter­
esting, you will know how pleased our
Ad man Is when anyone makes a help­
ful suggestion.
This week a friend sent us this
clever line:
The First National Bank
THE STORY WRITTEN IN YOUR PASS
BOOK BY THE RECEIVING TELLER
IS FULL OF INTEREST AND ALWAYS
HAS A HAPPY ENDING.
BUTLER BANKING COMP
HOOD RIVER. OREGON
Comes only once a year. Why wait for the
grand rush? Do your shopping now and
choose from a large Variety of
CHRISTMAS
GOODS
NOW ON DISPLAY AT THE
HOOD RIVER DRUG CO
NINE OUT OF TEN of our custo-
mers when ordering coal ask not
merely for “a ton of coal," they say
quite definitely ‘‘al ton of KING Coal.'
Why? Simply because they have ex
perimented with other and cheaper
coals and that first order of KING con­
vinced them that it delivered more
heat per dollar. That is the test—not
the price per ton. They now realize
that it does not pay to buy cheaper
coal and when they need some more
they say —
i
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Send me a ton of KING Coal.
Men like gifts most,
from a men’s store
BATH ROBES
Beautiful colorings...
t8.00toS12.00
Silk or silk and wool
EMRY LUMBER & FUEL CO
The Home 6f KING Coal
PHOENIX HOSIERY
II to
$1.5 1
CHENEY TIES
Everyone knows the quality.. 75K-$ 1 «60
FLORSHEIM OXFORDS
We can exchange the size
110.00
WALK-OVER
ARROW SHIRTS
An endless variety
|2toS8.B0
HICKOK MONOGRAM BELTS >2.50
FANCY HANDKERCHIEFS
A Good Line of Merchandise
To Choose From
YOURS FOR QUALITY AND SERVICE
Grain Brogue Oxfords
R. 0. SCHE, THE JEWELER
Phone 1291
Pythian Building
$1.00
Make yourselves la Xmas Present of a
GOOD TOP and SIDE CURTAINS
Nationally Known Merchandise
CELEBRATION DREW A BIG CROWD
Saturday Hood River, White Salara aad
Uadenrrad Folk Begaa Era of
New AequiataKeahip
CHRISTMAS OARDS—We have a wonderful line to choose from
The sting of that loss might stay with you
all your life.
NEWBRIDGE
IS NOW OPEN
Mad« Right and Guaranteed by
CENTRAL TOP SHOP
IM OAX STREET
F. E. NEWELL, Prop.
DOWN TOWN
bridge« were constructed
per river A Northwestern Railway is
Alaska from 1908 to 1911 under his
direction, there being used in the con­
struction of these bridge« 26,000 cubic
yards of concrete and 10,000 tons of
structural steel. Um of these five
•trio t urea is the Milos glacier bridge
referred to In Rex Beaches story,
referred to In Rex Beach’s Story,
He was superintendent of construc-
tlon <>u the Hawthorne avenue bridge
and also the Steel bridge, both of
which span the Willamette river at
Portland. In 1914 he had charge of
the erection of the steel for th« canti­
lever «pan over Spokane falls and the
sti-el girders over Monroe street in
8pokane. for the contracting firm of
Wakefield A O’Neel. Under his direc­
tion steel bridge« were erected ou th«
8. P. A 8. Railway between Portias«
and Spokane, aa weU a« the highway
bridge over the Wilamette at Salem
and the Southern Pacific Railroad
bridge over the Wlllasaette st Albany.
Mr. McDonald waa associated with
Roltert Wakefield in the Portland
Bridge A Building Co. for many
years. In 1921 ba
ho joined th«
the Gilpin
Construction Company and !s vice
president of that corporation now.
When it raise time to build the Hood
River-White Salmon bridge and eelect
the man to direct lta construction the
task fell to him.
The Oregon-Washington Bridge Com­
pany, a private corporation, ia the
owner of the bridge. Gray A Chand­
ler, of Seattle, ar« the engineers and
the Gilpin Conatntetton Company, of
Portland, the contractors:
With a simple and brief ceremony
the Hood Klver-White Salmen inter­
state bridge acroaa the Columbia river
was thrown open to traffic at 10 a. m.
Saturday. The last spike in the Via
duct, the total length of which is
4.24« feet, was driven by Italic
Butler.
"This is not a mere bridge,” said
Mr. Butler, before he weilded the
«ledge and sank the iron «pike to its
head. “It ia a monument to the spirit
of cooperation among the people of
Hood River county, Oregon, and those
of Klickitat and Skamania counties.
Washington; a spirit of cooperation
that made |M>salble the construction
of the interstate span.”
E. O. Blancnar, member of the
board of trustees of the bridge, bad
charge of the program on behalf of
the Hood River Chamber of Com­
merce. . This body took the lead in
generating a sentiment favorable to
the bridge here summer before last,
aud thia sentiment, although mld-
Columbla apple growers had sold
their 1922 crop at a loss, resulted in
a $15,000 oversubscription of an allot­
ment of $75,000 in preferred stock
to the inld-Columbia communities.
Following the driving of the last
spike Mayor Perigo ,of Hood River,
The lighting «duMtloMl committee,
stepped across the newly laid plank consisting of Mrs. A. G. Lewis, chair­
and grasped the hand of Ira D. Hyde, man, Walter Colby, Truman Butler,
mayor of White Salmon. When the L. B. Gibaon and Joe I>. Thomimm,
mayors
had
extended
greetings. ha« finished grading th« eaaaya sub­
County Judge liaabronck gave a mitted by the boy« and girls of Hood
brief s|>eech, recalling the doubt tlmt River and has announced the follow-'
existed in the minds of many when Ing prise winners:
the bridge project was first suggested.
Girls—let., Lottie Flint, 21 E. State
He cited the spans aa a refutation of ateet; 2nd, Wilma Murphy, 1026 Cas­
the spirit of pessimism in the mid- cade ave., 3rd, Lncille Tomlinson,
Columlda. He paid a tribute to the Belmont Road.
vision of the engineers, E. M. Chand­
Boys—1«U Ray Henry Bteubllng,
ler and Harry Gray, who first an­
nounced the feasibility. Originally it 922 Eighth Street; 2nd, Harold Jams
was decided to christen the new in­ Forden, R. F. D. No. fi; 8rd, Richard
terstate span the Waukoma bridge, IM-lbridge, Box 157.
Honorable mention — Georgia Elea­
the aboriginal name for Hood River,
meaning a place of big cottonwoods. nor Forden, R. F. D. fi, Box 57; Mar­
Judge HasbH>uck expressed an aji- garet Ann Smithson, 806 Twelfth
preciation to the officials of the avenue; George Palmer, 1723 Shermah
bridge company for agreeing to avenue; Dorothy Anderson, 1802 Watt
change the name to Hood River- Sherman ave.
The first priae la each mm epa-
White Salmon interstate bridge, thus
bringing beneficial publicity to the HletB of merchandise to the value of
two towns most immediately affected $25. Hecoud prise, Mrcbandiae to the
value of $16. Third prise
by the
CONFERENCE
DRAWS mm
GROWERS TAKIA
elded to hold aa adjo
rrod’aSd
were read Tri day by committed'
dairying, potato growing aad W««
raising.
The Hood River
ninth to be held ia
LOTTIE FLINT WINS
HOME LIGHT CONTEST
on the
the tie
feet alsive the Columbia's snrfach.
The crowd was about equally divided
between Oregon and Washington citi­
zens, the former on the south side
and the latter pressing forward from
the north side of the space cleared
for the opening celebration.
Mr.
Chandler paid a tribute to C. N. Mc­
Donald, veteran north western con­
struction man, who superintended
construction ot the project for the
Gilpin Construction Co., ot which he
is vice president. The crowd gave
the veteran bridge man, who has been
engaged on major bridge work
through the Northwest and in Alaska
since 1887, an ovation.
Mr. Blanchar then presented J. A.
McEachern. president of the construc­
tion eoinlMiny. who declared that bls
task was building bridges, not talking'
‘T do, however,” said Mr. McEach­
ern. “want to ‘pay my respects to
theae boys who built the bridge."
And in a gesture he took in a coterie
of men, bolder than any of the as­
sembled laymen and who had ascend­
ed steel stringers for vantage point of
view. “I want you to know that much
credit must go to these- men. who
aided Mr. McDonald and Alvin Lar­
son. his lientenant, for the succvsafnl
complet ion of the sjian.”
Mr. Blanchar read a telegram of
congratulations from the following
officials of the O.-W. R. $ N. On.: J
P. O’Brien, A. S. Edmonds. William
McMurray and J. "H. Fredricy. "Ton
people of Hood River and White
Balmon are making history today,
You are winning the plaudits of the
people of the two states."
This completed the brief ceremony
and immediately the peoples of the
(Continued on page- seven)
c. n . M c D onald has
BUILT MANY BRIDGES
With the opening of the bridge
across the Columbia between Hood
River and White Balmon, another un­
dertaking has been brought to com­
pletion by C. N. McDonald, veteran
bridge builder and construction man
of the northwest.
“Charlie” McDonald, aa he is fa­
miliarly known in construction circles,
is reroonsible more than any other
man for the succcMful contruction of
this big structure for be was the man
on the job who had to fight the ele­
ments every day during the construc­
tion of this bridge and the credit is
due him for Its succeaaful completion.
He has been identified with bridge
construction work in the northwest
for the past .37 years. He came to
Portland in 1887 and secured employ­
ment on the old Ainsworth dock,
which was at that time being built.
Among the numerous projects Mr.
McDonald has been connected with
was the construction of the John Day
bridge In 1887 and 1888 on what
was then the O. R. A N. Company's
line. Tills was a 800-foot Iron bridge
and was the first of its kind to lie
erected In thia part a* the country.
In 1897 and 1898 iie was In charge of
construction of steel bridges on the
Astoria A Colombia River Railway
between Portland and Astoria, Dnr-
ing 1901 and 1902 he was super Intend -
rot of construction on steel bridges
I and arch culverts on the Northern
Pacific Railway between Portland and
Kalama, the most Important of the**
bridge« being the one over the Lewis
river. In 1906 the Wells-Fargo build­
ing was built in Portland and he sn-
. perintended the erection. Tire steel
tioaa in production from
The moat of these vol
ever, occur in the hasty
states, New York..
Michigan and Virginia.1
Ington and California
variation, and it la
of the
lighting of th« home at the
time, and the means whereby it could
t»e greatly improved.
The prize« were donated by Max
Moore, Apple City Electric Shop and
the Pacific Power MfAght Company.
The wiayi of the prise winner«
and also those who received honorable
mention have been entered in the
national <oQipetltlon, the prize« of
which follow, dne boy and one girl
each:
Arthur Footer, held
Flrat prise, $15,000 model electrical of the department of
home; 2nd prise, fl,200 schotarahip; of Portland Chamber
3rd priae, $000 scholarship; 4 th prise. wan chief speaker at the
$600 Hcholarahlp; 5th prise, $800
scholarship; «th prise, $300 acholar-
abip.
FOSTER TELLS OF
1 in* t Ht’lil v 1 UWP!
® lARnt
nSR
left a number of the primers used by
eon testa nt a. They were prepared by
the best of authorities on home light­
ing and will be worth the study of
anyone wishing to better home light­
ing conditions. The company will be
pleased to give them out to applicants
as long as the supply lasts.
POULTRY SHOW AT
OLD U. B. CHURCH
The old United Brethren church.
which has not been need for the past
10 years for religious purposes, will
I* the scene December 19 and 20 of
the second annual Hood River Coun­
ty Poultry show. The pews of the
auditorium will lie removed and dis­
play coops of the vaUey's finest fowls
will be placed there.
The old church, recently purchased
by Albert Krieg, a local contractor,
will be remodeled immediately and
turned into an apartment bouse.
Edward Thornton, arranging for
entries to the show, urges that all val­
ley folk who wish to make displays
get in touch with him at one« by
dropping a postal card or telephoning
No. 5922.
All birds mnst be numbered and
banded this year Entry fees arc as
follows: Pens of five, four hens and
a rooster, $1; Individual birds, 35
cents each. Nobody in Hood River
county will be barred. A handsome
premium list is being prepared by the
merchants and business folk of Hood
River.
The silver sweepstakes trophy cup,
which was won last year by E. F. lug. He stated that auroral were
Batten, will again be competed for thinking of buying -land is B ea d
thia year.
River.
Mr. Footer Mid that a sydteta ’by
which the land oettletaotat depaitatest
had secured a eayrect appraisal and
MISS ANNA SPRING
GIVES BRIDGE ST
E. O. Blanchar Saturday announced
a gift of 10 aharee of the Hood Rivor-
White Balmon interstate bridge stock
by Mias Anna M. Spring to the Ilood
River community hoapltal fund. Two
years ago Mina Bpring donated an
East Side 8-acre orchard place aa a
nucleus for a community hoapltal.
The property wan sold for $4.500.
Minn Spring, who owns another or­
chard place in the valley and a home
at Point Loma, Calif., made Mr.
Blanchar trustee of the fund, which
now, exclunive of the bridge etock,
han reached an approximate $5,000.
cha». i. F. Duffy. traveling passenger
Northern ___
Pacific Co.,
agent for the
__ _______
wa« hrre laat wrok caiilng on
and dlatrlhuting calendan.
I