Medford mail tribune. (Medford, Or.) 1909-1989, May 29, 1941, Page 3, Image 3

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    MEDFORD MAIL TRIBUNE. MEDFORD. OREGON. THURSDAY. MAY 29. 1941.
PAfiE THREE
Society
by Betty
Mrs. Lewis
Entertains Club
Members of the F. L. club
No. 7 met recently at the home
of Mrs. Howard Lewis in Jack
sonville. The group honored
Mrs. Eugene Buck who was
married early in the month,
with a miscellaneous shower.
The remainder of the evening
was spent in war-relief knitting.
Refreshments were served
later by the hostess to Mrs.
Lewis Thompson. Mrs. Willard
Cover, Mrs. P. R. Bateman, Mrs.
O. S. Walden. Mrs. Buck, Mrs.
P. M. Aldredge, Mrs. Carlos
Morris, Miss Edna Hilderbrand,
4 Miss Marian Mellin, Miss Nell
Cator.
Shower Honors
Ester Stevens
Miss Esther Stevens was hon
ored with a miscellaneous
shower Tuesday evening at the
home of Kathleen and Jewel
O'Neal. Games were played and
later refreshments were served,
Including punch from an old
fashioned well.
Honoring Miss Stevens, whose
marr'.age will be an event of the
near future, were Bob Miller,
Eileen Kaggie, Grace Poet, Lila
Faye, Lillian Daugherty, Jean
etta Arnold, Mrs. Fern Berry,
Rosella Berry, Mrs. Elva Laml
son, Carl Weber, Vida Beers,
Orman Tompkins, Duana Fair
child, Mr. and Mrs. O'Neal and
the hostesses.
Mrs. LaMarr Hera
pt For Graduation Exercises
Mrs. Andrew W. LaMarr has
arrived in Medford from Fort
Benning, Ga., to attend the
graduation exercises of her son,
Andrew Jr. Mrs. LaMarr mot
ored west accompanied by her
parents.
Curb Service
BEGINS FRIDAY
AT
W mm-wax V
Yh, starting FRIDAY courteous attendants will serve
your favorite beverages or delicious foods AT YOUR
CAR ... You'll like this friendly tray service won't
you try it?
FREE SOUVENIR
y-trthvlfl I j Iff 'f '.1
TO VISIT THE I A i I 1
IlitrWeinlui-Irroirf t. Z H
fr v.''
1W1
nd Clubs
Shoemaker
Wanda Wyant Weds
Tom Fairchild
At Parents' Home
Lake Creek, May 29. (Sp!)
Wedded at the L. H. Wyant
home at Lake Creek Saturday
evening were Miss Wanda
Wyant, daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. L. H. Wyant and Tom
Fairchild of Medford. The cere
mony was read by the Rev. E.
J. Wine of Ashland.
The bride chose a white silk
organdie gown with rhinestone
accessories and carried an arm
bouquet of pink roses. Mrs
Wright Nims, sister of the
groom, was matron of honor.
She wore a pink and blue out
fit. Also attending the bride was
Miss Lois Wright of Browns
boro who wore a light blue silk
dress with a corsage of pink
and white flowers. Wright
Nims, brother-in-law of the
groom, acted as best man.
The bride was given in mar
riage by her father in the pres
ence of members of the immed
iate families and close friends.
Miss Margaret Leninger, accom
panied by Leo Wine at the pi
ano, sang "I Love You Truly."
The guests were greeted by
Miss Fern Wyant.
Following the ceremony a re
ception was held at the Wyant
home and later Mr. and Mrs.
Fairchild left for a motor trip
to Salt Lake City, Los Angeles
and other California points.
Upon their return in a month
they will be at home in Med
ford. Mrs. Emmons
Home From East
Mrs. J. J. Emmons has re
turned to Medford after spend
ing the last eight months in
Philadelphia visiting relatives.
THE
while They Lart.
For Tray Service pat
rons Friday and Sat
urday. "
DISTRIBUTED BY SXIDER DAIRY fc PRODUCE COMPANY
She was accompanied to Med
ford by her son, Dr. Thomas
Emmons, who has been engaged
in post graduate study in Phil
adelphia. Mrs. Emmons and Dr.
Emmons motored to Medford
from the east. Dr. Emmons' wife
and small son, Robert Walter,
arriving recently by plane.
Dr. and Mrs. Emmons are
guests at the home of Mrs. Em
mons" parents, Mr. and Mrs.
Walter Inch. Mrs. J. J. Emmons
is residing at the Hotel Med
ford until her home, 1443 East
Main street, is ready for occupancy.
Guests Attend
Piano Recital
Seventy guests attended a pi
ano recital at the Maddox
studios Monday evening when
Ailccne Crawford Maddox pre
sented her students in an in
formal musical program.
As a special feature Mr.
Maddox presented two of his
voice pupils, Geneva Spalding
of Grants Pass and Bill Alves
of Ashland. A social hour fol
lowed. Taking part in the piano re
cital were Mary Jo Hall, Fern
Wagner, Beatrice Wagner, Patty
Merriman, Joan Pomeroy, Mar
lene Vincent, Ramon Marion,
Noelle Sloneker, Marlyss Frank
lin, Gene Holdenness, Leona
Holdenness, Barbara Williams,
Deah Rose, Barbara Olson,
Dolores Wolf, Virginia Gib
gons, Marilyn Nichols, Gary
Hawk, Betty Lemmon, Helen
Hornish, Vera Smith, Dorothy
Young, Wanda Johnson and
Phyllis Furry,
Miss Andrews Flies
South For Wedding
Miss Joan Andrews, employee
In the office of District Attor
ney George Neilson, left by
United Mainliner this morning
for San Francisco where she
will attend the wedding of Miss
Elsie Brown and Frank C.
Grove, both of this city, Friday
afternoon at 4 o'clock in the
bay city.
Miss Brown Is secretary In
the law offices of Neff and
Frohnmayer and Mr. Grove,
who is connected with the Pa
cific Greyhound Lines, has re
cently been transferred to Med
ford from Redding, Cal.
Miss Andrews will visit her
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Frank J.
Andrews, residents of San Fran
cisco, during her stay In that
city.
EDITOR DIES WHILE
Vancouver, Wash., May 29.
(JF) Herbert J. Campbell, 58,
editor and publisher of the Co
lumbia for 20 years, died early
today in Portland, Ore. He suc
cumbed to a heart attack while
en route home from a trip, but
was able to pull his car over
to the curb and halt it.
His death closed a newspaper
career of 35 years throughout
which he had been associated
with the profession in the north
west. "ongmjajad.
BLITZ-WEINHARD is today the
largest selling beer in Oregon!
There's a reason for this over
whelming popular demand. A
good reason! Blitz-Weinhard has
that certain something that sat
isfies you! That's why every half
second someone else says ....
"Make Mine Blitz-Weinhard!
BLITZ-WEINHARD COMPANY
PORTLAND, ORIQOM
i -
OREGON. CITIZENS
TO BE ENROLLED
IN DEFENSE BODY
Airplane Spotters, Fire Bomb
Quenchers and First Aid
Service Among Duties
Salem, May 29. (P) Thou-
sands of Oregon citizens will be
i enrolled in civilian defense
activities as soon as Governor
Charles A. Sprague's civilian de
fense council, to be appointed
in a few days, can enlist them.
Budget Director David Eccles
said today on his return from
Washington, D. C.
"The most Important activity.
as far as Oregon is concerned,
will be the airplane spotters,"
Eccles said, "although we also
will enroll volunteers whose
job will be to extinguish fire
I bombs, fight fires, give first aid
I to injured civilians, and to per
form other war jobs.
"Of course, there isn't much
; chance that Oregon, outside of
j Portland or the lower Columbia
I river areas, will be bombed.
That is why the airplane spot
ters win De more neeaea man
the other volunteers.
No Stat Guard
All of this might sound a
little premature, but it is better
to begin immediate training of
a highly-organized civilian de
fense force. Then we would be
ready if we need it. And if we
don't need it, nothing is lost
anyway.
Eccles, who also Is executive
secretary to the governor, was
advised by federal officials to
begin organization of the civilian
volunteers as soon as possible.
"However, government offic
ials said they could see no reason
why Oregon should have a state
guard. We do plan, however, to
rely on a reinforced state police
to deal with emergencies."
AUTOlSlEA
AT
Minor scratches on the face
and bruises were the extent of
injuries suffered by Patrick
Shea of Medford about 8:45 last
night when he was struck by
an automobile operated by Jes
sie S. Richardson of Central
Pri-it at the intersection of West
Main and Front streets, city po
lice reported today.
Shea, police said, was crossing
Main street from north to south
when he was struck by the left
front fender of the Richardson
machine, traveling west on Main
street. The pedestrian was
knocked to the pavement but
quickly arose, not seriously in
jured.
Closing time for Too Late to clas
sify Ads Is 1:80 p. m.
fcecause.
Net Star Takes a Bride
sCy.
vf I 4vk lu fa x
Donald Budge, professional tennis star, and Miss Dlerdre
Conselman, 19 year-old Stanford university student oi Glendal.
Cal.. enter St. Chrysostom's Protestant church, Chicago, for their
wedding.
Allies Trouble in Crete Due '
To Lack of Aerial Support
By DeWitt MicKtnsla
Associated Press Analyst
The position of the Anglo-Greek allies in the battle of Crete
was so grave today that even as this is being written they well
may have been compelled to give up the fight to retain control
of that strategic island.
During the ten days of one of I
the fiercest battles of history
the nazi dive-bombers have all
but blasted Crete out of the
water. Late Greek reports re
cord that the cities of the island
literally are pulverized by the
deluge of high explosives that
have produced an Inferno in
which civilians and troops alike
have struggled.
Allied Millstone
Lack of air-power in the east
ern Mediterranean Is the mill
stone about the allied neck. It
will so continue to be until this
deficiency is supplied from
America.
Some London observers be
lieve that if the Hitlerites win
the batUe of Crete they will turn
their attention next to the big
British naval base on the Island
of Cyprus. This lies four hun
dred miles to the east of Crete
and off the coast of Syria.
That might indeed be an early
objective, but possession of Crete
would give the Nazis a fairly
wide choice of moves. In any
event, they must take time out
for consolidation of the bomb
torn island before it will be of
much value as a base for further
major operations.
It is quite possible that the
Germans will by-pass Cyprus for
the moment, and try to establish
themselves in Syria. This would
provide a necessary base for a
drive through Palestine to Egypt
and the Suez canal, and it wo'ld
give them handy airdromes for
an assault against Cyprus.
Closer to Egypt
Also of vast and perhaps more
immediate Importance is the fact
that possession of Crete would
bring German bombers within
250 miles of the Libyan-Egyptian
border on the north African
coast, where the axis expedi
tionary force is maneuvering for
an opening to drive into Egypt
In fact, this entire stretch of
coast, including the all-important
British naval base at Alex
andria, and the Suez canal,
would be brought within very
handy bombing distance for the
Nazis.
While possession of the island
of Crete doesn't by a long shot
win the conflict for domination
of the eastern Mediterranean, It
would be of inestimable value in
development of the German
campaign. The only satisfaction
the British and their allies get
out of the situation is that the
German victory if so it proves
to be has been tremendously
costly.
The British claim that the
Nazis have thrown equipment
L 1 "'6
ei ew li..n 5 1 IS 3 L tL
Vete. (-JC 11 J 1 O
1 1 A cm ef OeeSMN rfT7 i
'.''""-.4.V?r S'.uLik' i ic-stmnVsi
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away right and left and among
other things have lost many of
the 1,200 transport planes they
are said to have assembled in
Greece for the effort to drive
the allies from the eastern Medi
terranean. That will be a blow
to Hitler. For those big planes
cannot be replaced overnight.
BIDS SCANNED ON
Ti
Superintendent E. P. Leavitt
of Crater Lake national park
was notified today by the pub
lic roads administration office
in Portland that the C. .T. Eldon
'firm of Portland had submitted
the low bid of $10,810 for bitu
minous surfacing of four and
half to five miles of park high
way between the rim of the lake
and Annie Springs camp. Three
bids were received.
Work on the project, Mr
Leavitt stated, would start as
soon as the weather permits,
and would probably bo complet
ed in July or early August. The
new surface, it was explained
will preserve the old road built
In 1020 until such time as a
better road may be constructed.
Mr. Leavitt said he had rec
ommended that the Eldon bid be
accepted.
SIGN WITH CHAIN
Portland. Ore.. May 29 UP
First break in Portland's six-
day-old bakery strike occurred
today when AFL union bakers
signed a new contract with Ro
tary Bread stores.
Rotary, a chain company, re
sumed operations at its five bak
eries this morning.
Other bakeries rejected a
peace offering by the employers
The offer provided a 10 per cent
wage increase, boosting salaries
to $1.10 per hour, plus an agree
ment to reduce night baking to
a minimum.
De really SMART...
b COMFORTABLE
M. M. DEPT.
STORE
h 8mt&tttc&l
l J I O' onus imis
Motorists planning outings in
the Jackson county forests over
the Decoration Day week-end
were warned by the Rogue River
national forest service that all
roads were slippery and muddy
and that chains would be neces
sary on most of the trips.
One road was impassable and
was not expected to be open
until next week. It was the
Dead Indian road, where sev
eral huge mud-holes in the vi
cinity of Deadwood made that
highway unfit for traffic. The
road from Butte Falls to Fish
lake and Lake of the Woods was
especially slippery and muddy,
and motorists were cautioned
that chains would be absolutely
feoma Win. Company,
in
. . ?.
v
WIN THIS HUGE TROPHY!
If Mr,. I, UK II I
I J BIKE I I i I
" - J
Ride Your Bicycle in
Montgomery Ward's
REGISTER AT WARDS. AT ON a I
DECORATE YOUR BICYCLEI
WW THIS TROPHY, OR ONE OF
THE BIO MERCHANDISE PRIZESI
MONTGOMERY WARD
117 SOUTH CENTRAL
necessary for passage on that
FOUR DRAFTEES
Salem, May 29 tj Trans
portation schedules for the 177
Oregon draftees who will be in
ducted Into the army at the Port
land armory June 23-25 were)
announced today by state selec
tive service headquarters.
They include:
To report June 25: Jackson.
No. 1. 2; Jackson No. 2. 2.
MONTAO FURNACES
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