Medford mail tribune. (Medford, Or.) 1909-1989, April 30, 1934, Page 6, Image 6

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    PAGE srx
JII ; ;;D MAIL TRIBTTNT!,' JfEDFORD, OKEGOy, MONDAY, APRIL 30, 1934.
Judith Lane
bu J HAWK HOW MAN
Chapter 43
ON THE 8TAND
JUDITH arose and rushed away to
a far corner. She bad no business
listening, but to whom could be be
talking? Judge Morgun probably, he
would be Interested li. how she was
feeling.
Lator that morning, as she was
dressing, she thought again of the
conversation. The line, "she hadn't
expected that kind of an attack."
Well, she hadn't. She sent Delphy
for the wide brimmed hat and pulled
Jt low over her face. She would at
least have that protection, It Laitr
pore came In with other unjUBt ac
cusations. At the court room she discovered
that Lampere had oioved the chairs
of tho Bovlns' women forward so
tbnt thoy faced Judith across a wide
table, in fact, so that every time sbe
looked towards the jury box, ber
gaze would be Intercepted by tbe
hatred which seemed to dwell eter
nally In Mathlle's eyes.
"An old trick, we'll fii that," said
Judge Morgan, end moved his cli
ent's chair back to the end of tbe
table so that she nat lt full view, but
only by deliberately turning their
backs to tbe Judge, could the Bovlns
women stare their opponent out of
countenance.
The morning was used by Lam
pere to eatabllBh his claim that Tom
: Bovlns was mentally ill during the
last year of his life. To prove this be
called the Bevlns servants, personal
friends. Dr. Kenneth Kelly was
placed on the stand to testify to the
naturo of Tom Bevlns' illness and
to admit that sucb an lllnoss could
cause a mental reaction, even an ad
vanced state of dementia.
''That will be all," said Lampere.
"But, Mr. Lampere." objectod Dr.
Kelly, "In testifying I want It under
stood that whore Tom Bovlns was
concerned"
"That will be all," repeated Lara
pero, "I will call tbe noxt wit
ness . , ." he glanced towards Judith;
sbe was trembling with Indignation,
anger. Her wide grey eyes were bril
liant with tears.
"Miss Lane , , , I beg your pardon,
Mrs. Dnlo, will you kindly take the
stand?" i
"Y
OUR ' Honor," Judge Morgan
Judgo by the time (.ampere's voice
had stopped. "Mr. Ijampeio forgets
that my client Is not the defendant
His work here Is to prove.tho fallacy
of the will, not to persecu'to Its pres
ent benoilclary."
Judith touched his arm, "I don't
mind, Judge Morgan, I'm ready
now."
Judith took her actvt looking at
Lampere with a calm gate which
should have btcn disconcerting.
"MIbs, er, Mrs. Dale, when did
you first meet Tom Bovlns?"
"1 don't remember exactly."
"Oh, come now, maybe 1 can re
fresh your memory. What yoar did
yon leave college?"
"But I'd met him years bofore
that He was my father's partner
when I wasn't more than a yoar old.
1 believe my first recollection of him
'was when 1 was five or six. He
'brought me a doll and gave the tore
hum's boy a toy engine with flat
core."
"Very pretty story." laughed Lain
pcro, then with elaborate sarcasm,
"and of course you can prove It."
"Yes," answered Judith, and mo
tioned Judge Morgan to hand her a
letter, yoilowed with ago.
liMtmtr Kainrtl.
WASHINGTON, April 30 (API
Tilt poetotflca department toddy an-
Ecklcy m noting postmaster ot La'
Grande, Oregon.
Phona 6(2. We'll haul awaj your
refuae. city Sanitary Serric.
"Your honor, I would like to enter
this as exhibit A," said Morgan, be
fore releasing tbe letter to Judith.
"It Isn't necessary to read It,"
barked Lampere.
"But you asked for proof," re
turned Judith sweetly, "this letter
Is to my father, telling him another
train, flat cars and toy derrick are
en route to me. Tbe date la"
"I'll pass that, Mrs. Dale. When
did you next meet Tom BevlnsT"
"I saw him frequently during my
childhood until father went to South
America and I started In college. Be
cause of my mother's death when I
was ten years old, 1 went Into the
Bold with my father, t bad every In
tention of becoming an engineer
so"
"IV I RS. DALE, I am not asking for
1VI y0ur ufe'a history, 1 am ask
ing you about yoar relations with
Tom Bovlns. When did you first be
come intimately acquainted with
Mr. Bovlns?"
"I received word of my father'!
death while 1 was In school. Mr.
Bevlns was In Austin at the time
and heard of It He came to me and
offered to help me In any way be
could."
"How did he help you?"
"By advising me what to do."
' "Come now, Mrs. Dale, do you
mean you didn't accept money from
him at the time?"
"I did not I was very young and
very proud. My father had goni
against Big Tom's advice In going to
South America and had lost what
monw he bad by doing so. I felt II
would be disloyal to my father'i
memory to accept money."
"Why, then, did you try to forct
your way Into his home?"
"I didn't!" . .
"Oh yes you did. Vou came down
there bag and baggage, descended
on Mrs. Bevlns, and made yoursell
thoroughly at home. Didn't you, Mrs.
Dale . . . honost, now, didn't you?"
"Mr. Bovlns suggested I stay with
them while I went to business
school."
"But you didn't."
"Not after I heard Mrs. Bevlns say
she wouldn't have me around the
house."
"And then didn't you and Tom
Bovlns go Into a huddle and decide
you were to come Into his office at
the firs' opportunity?"
"No," returned Judith, calmly, "I
only Intended working at stenogra
phy until I bad earned enough to
complete my college course."
"Then why didn't you do that,
stead of hanging around the million
aire engineer?"
"Because after I had worked there
a short time I realised I was learn
ing more about engineering than I
could learn In college. 1 was earning
as much as a young woman engineer
could learn and I was happy and
contented."
"Mrs. Dale, prior to your marrlags
and when you were living In your
pent house, was It not true that Tom
bevlns was a constant visitor
there?"
"Yes, be was," answered Judith
readily, "the most welcome visitor
who came",
"Mrs. Dale, would It embarrass
you too much to tell the jury why
Mr. Bevlns called on you so often?"
"No." Judith caught her ander Up
in a quick smile, "he came to eat
slumgulllon."
fCopvrtcM. IJ. 6v JyoNMS Bowman)
Tomorrow, Judlth'i ordtal eon
tlnuoi.
4Jiiw.U uoftuo
0,1111 !.imam nun luXiiim uMnno
.., pu,tt ,twv . 0) q,not ,,,j,poln
-f.
WINDOW OLAS3 Wt wll window
glue and will reptar your Broken
wlndowa rtaaonaoly. Trowbridge Co
met Worm
FIRS! BABY BOY
OF JACKSONVILLE
IS NOW AGED 81
GRANTS PAJSS (Spl.) The flrfct
lusty boy-baby yell to be drowned Jn
the medley of noise that filled the
air of the colorful mining town In
Jacksonville In 1853, came from trie
lungs of Cornelius J, Armstrong now
of Grant Pass, who will mark down
his eighty-second birthday next Feb
ruary. "If it hadn't ben that a girl, mi ri
me Taylor, was born two weeks before
I was. I would also have ben the first
white child to call Jacksonville his
birthplace," Armstrong said recently,
j (Straight, alert, Armstrong does not
' use glasses, his hearing Is apparently
' good, and his hair retains a reddish
tinge.
The family Bible baring his name,
the date and place of his birth, Is
carefully kept In a safe place In his
little cottage at Ardencralg, home of
ft, M. O. Weill on Redwood highway
near here.
His parents, R. O, Armstrong, and
Minerva Jane, made the trip by prat
rle schooner from Iowa to Oregon in
exactly six months, arriving In Jack
sonville In 1B52. Their party Included
nine, wagons, Armstrong remembers
his father telling him.
The Armstrong family resided on &
ranch two and one-half miles north
of Jacksonville for man - years. Cor
nelius has two sisters, both. Living In
Portland. They are Miss Emma Alice
Armstrong and Mrs. Martha Fleck.
- Armstrong, a native Oregonlan, has-
S MATTER POP
VeT f( rflW3.A-7 SOLOTIOM. TEL J ( ) ( JP APTCTSL. )
P' J) SOTCE . I A I KIT ) ( OlTt MAW TO I V oL MEAL5 '
v ( USIN it "3ecfP SoMt I W j V. V 7 r-S
V. T4js EVE A FEW J - '1 k L-J'
-11-$f 4 ' vljaaTP-- jl . i tt (Copyright, 1934, by Tbe Bell Syndicate, IncO
TAILSPIN TOMMY A "Perfect Crack-Up!" ; . ' ' ' - ",' ' ' By Hal Forrest
BEN WEBSTER'S CAREER A Great Old Salt? ' ' By Edwin Alger
fvOUVE DONE A GOOD DASJ3 WOW. Vf'POH MV WORoV' "SHIFTS"1 SLL HEFI I'rlOTHlM' 0Olr? fA6V TMERE,' TVTHEREj IP .J?'?) (Suaearnl
CAPN IKE, HAVE WLI'JE fM? CflP'N IKE, BUT I NOTHIN7 ON fl CRUISE CAP'M IKE NO RISK IN I THIS CRUISE, WW 'J "SlflSTIC U .S-ucSofiSsTO
CHARTERED THE 'MAGGIE'flT A FAT THE OLD GIRL. . ff 'SHE GOES, AN' YOU'RE SIGNED WO MORE ( ) HEARTVCOME NOW, ROUND DP I AeOUT CAP'N I U ALT "0 RUGGED,
' PRICH, AN' YOU'LL RUN THINGS AT Mt5S- lOOYfo GOOD. ' I RIGHT NOW, MY LAD, AS SMUGGLE ) JACK SCROGGS FORME .LIKE A HV9r '
ANCHOR ISLAND THAT YOUNG SWAB) ARE YOU AIMIN' A FIRST MATE YOU'LL HAVE FORME L 6000 'UN TELL JACK NOTTOLET rO rOU me.ET 1JUST FEEL TVAT
WILL BE MADE TO FIT UNDER YOUR feffe JW TO SELL HER ? LiUST ONE MORE VOYAGE, - rj? IMYONg SEE HIM COME ASOARDJ KNOWN HM J VrOULL BE SAFE WITHHIM,MV
TENrly - j
THE KEBB3 Wlutt No Letter? . - ' By Sol Hess
I' LGMMY, VOU SEEM A BIT "V L MW BE TAKIKJG II VOO'O BETTER. LOOK STiVE LOOKED TIME S CHAtOCES ARS IF SME DID CURITE
VW6RRIED - THAT OLD DEVIL- IlW OOf5 A. EIT aSAW.TUERE MOST BE AV10 A.SA.INJ THROOGW A LETTER SHE'D SISSJ IT'VOORS A
I MW-CARE. LOOK SEEMS A SERIOUSLV BUT I LETTER HERS FOR ME.. EVERY TWIKJS AKJO I TRULV" SHE'S SO COLD TMAT ICE
V TO HAN'S SOME FEEL 6REAT. OUST LOOK THROUGH ALL THE A IF" VOUR NAME IS VJOULDVOT MELT IKJ HER HAlOD . JZ
. Hejroce . ?"Jsees, siKJ5lkJG letters - mavbe vou 7 9uoer,thei?es A I loell, if she twikjks vm fir
- f- YCl aT33? t-WSELF i CHUCKED IT IUTO THEf V SJOTHIKKo HERe.TT UJORRVIKlG, , SHE'S CRAXYITS( 0fe?
lijl 1 " iJ
I 1 111 11 mi a a 1
I BRINGING UP FATHER ' By Qeoree McManus
VELL-WE AREGOIMd I ( VOO ) II riR,T CO AMD 1 I ITLUTAKE. T II DID VOU 1 I Vrt-WE AFLE jj li OH1 I'M GLAD I MADE I
CLEANING AMD C THROUGH WE ARE GOING TO READ DADDV? CLEAN HOU"oE 5PEND THE WEEK. O 9
HERE 1 A LliT THINKtM' U TO START IN WHT I'M I J TO-DTY AN' WITH SOME OF MY J NJ
' QF SOMEOF THE UPTHINC) TO-OAt AND SUPPOSED IC THERE'S A LOT ClF?L FRIENOS WHO J X P
I l'ri f 71 j iUiiii 1 if if- iu ,, w-7 MAm' II ' c,. ,2rMhf
been outside the state boundaries but
once, and that time only to Dunsmnir.
Cal. "California's all right, but I love
Oregon," be says, and smiles.
CRESCENT CITY FOLK
JUBILEE CONSCIOUS
Mr. and Mrs. Art Reed and daugh
ter have returned to Med ford after,
a two weeks' vacation at Crescent!
City and near-by territory, and an
rTrnT77TvITI HI VTITl fVm
Ei.AH-BLAH-BLAH-
t fiAW THIS PICTURE IM
DEMJEE. - W- A,H - a. AH --JOU
PROBABLE THINK.
TUe DI26.T2EL &END6E.
l& "HE MORUtB&K-DU l
In the end it turns .
o, if U-l PUT fiJP i1BlH-
- HAIRED WdMLO PLACER
'
nounced that & large number of res-
ldentn In that section plan to attend j
the Oregon Diamond Jubilee here In ;
June. ; J
Mr. Reed, a ranger with the Rogue j
River National forest, spent some
time viewing the logging of redwoods
w.hlch were put on the boats to be
milled at Coos Bay and also Port Or
ford cedars, which were being ship
ped to Japan. j
Fine weather was enjoyed by the
Reed family during the stay on the
coast.. They contacted many people
In the district, the majority saying
they were coming .here for the Jubi
lee. '
klCMEE. &AUJ AMV1UIMS-
KES-P CSOINCt LIKE THAT
A60lInE WITH
"TefcPAETwNL.
'u4
COMPOSITION
SHARPENS PENCIL, UVS OUT" PA
PER NEATLY, AND TRIES To THINK
Of SUBJECT foR A COMPOSIfiOtf
TEARS OFF SHEET. CRUMPLES ft
up, Throws it into firepaace.
missing, and tries to think
WHftT It) WRITE ABOUT
DRUMS ON DESK WITH PENCIL.
AKD PEN HOLDER
(Copyright, 1934, by The
AFTER TEN "MlNllftS HAS lttOU6Hf
ABOUT THE BhSEBAU. TEAK), HI5
P06, HOW HE DISLIKES SlRLS,
BUT OF NO SUBJECT FOR 'COMP
DRAFTS A NEW BATT1N6
ORDER FOR BASEBALL TEAty
TRIES SERI0U5LV TO CONCEN
TRATE BUT 6ETS SIDETRACKED
Y0NDERIN6 IF THAT'S A SPOT
ORARVON CEILIK&
Bell Syndicate, Inc.)
By GLUYAS WILLIAMS
draws a picture of something
That is either a cow or v6&
asks parehts for su6&est!0ns
awp vetoes Them all as
bein6 pull
DRAWS A PIRATE SHIP UNDER
SAIL, PECIDES To WRITE COMPO
SITION IN W0RNIN6 AND S0E5
TO SEP
By 0. M. Payne
1.