Hermiston herald. (Hermiston, Or.) 1994-current, December 06, 2017, Page A2, Image 2

Below is the OCR text representation for this newspapers page. It is also available as plain text as well as XML.

    A2 • HERMISTONHERALD.COM
THREE MINUTES WITH ...
HERMISTON HISTORY
MARK
GOMOLSKI
HH FILE PHOTO
Members of the Hermiston Future Farmers of America Aaron Bartoscheck, left, and Joey Cassens release 196 tiny trout
raised by FFA members into Minnehaha Creek 25 years ago.
Retired
When and why did you move to Hermiston?
Four years ago, I moved here. This is my retirement.
What is your favorite place to eat in Hermiston?
My home. The restaurants in town are limited Mexi-
can, Chinese, burgers, bad pizza, bar food, Thai and
a few comfort family type. Hermiston needs more and
better. No chains.
What do you like to do in your spare time?
Volunteer a lot of my time to different organizations.
What surprises you about Hermiston?
The kindness and friendliness of the people here.
What was the last book you read and why?
The War of the Roses. I might be traveling to Europe
again, and English history seemed a good place to
start.
What app or website do you use most often
other than Facebook or Google?
Hermiston School District, and the EO, since news-
paper delivery through mail is too late if at all.
If you could travel anywhere, where would you go?
Europe, South Africa, Australia, New Zealand, just
to start.
What is the funniest thing that’s ever happened
to you?
Too many to recall just one.
What is one of your goals for the next 12
months?
Get elected to the City Council.
What is your proudest accomplishment?
So far, moving to Hermiston and knowing I made the
right move.
Printed on
recycled
newsprint
VOLUME 111 ● NUMBER 49
Tammy Malgesini | Community Editor • tmalgesini@eastoregonian.com • 541-564-4539
Jayati Ramakrishnan | Reporter • jramakrishnan@hermistonherald.com • 541-564-4534
Jade McDowell | Reporter • jmcdowell@eastoregonian.com • 541-564-4536
Alexis Mansanarez | Sports Reporter • amansanarez@eastoregonian.com • 54-564-4542
Jeanne Jewett | Multi-Media consultant • jjewett@hermistonherald.com • 541-564-4531
Shannon Paxton | Offi ce coordinator • spaxton@hermistonherald.com • 541-564-4530
Audra Workman | Multi-Media consultant • aworkman@eastoregonian.com • 541-564-4538
Dawn Hendricks | Circulation District Manager • dhendricks@eastoregonian.com • 541-564-4540
To contact the Hermiston Herald for news,
advertising or subscription information:
• call 541-567-6457
• e-mail info@hermistonherald.com
• stop by our offi ces at 333 E. Main St.
• visit us online at: hermistonherald.com
The Hermiston Herald (USPS 242220, ISSN
8750-4782) is published weekly at Hermiston
Herald, 333 E. Main St., Hermiston, OR
97838, (541) 567-6457.
ANNUAL SUBSCRIPTION RATES
Delivered by carrier and mail Wednesdays
Inside Umatilla/Morrow counties .......... $42.65
Outside Umatilla/Morrow counties ....... $53.90
Periodical postage paid at Hermiston, OR.
Postmaster, send address changes to
Hermiston Herald, 333 E. Main St.,
Hermiston, OR 97838.
Member of EO Media Group Copyright ©2017
CORRECTIONS
25 YEARS AGO
DECEMBER 8, 1992
•A collection of letters
to President-elect Bill Clin-
ton from Hermiston stu-
dents were published in the
Hermiston Herald:
Dear
President-elect
Clinton, My name is Ste-
fani Workman. I am a fourth
grade student at Sunset Ele-
mentary School in Herm-
iston, Oregon. I am writ-
ing to give you my ideas
for schools in the future. I
think people would learn
better if we had smaller
classes, more helpers, if
desks were bigger and if we
had more money for supply
and equipment.
Sincerely,
Stefani Workman
Fourth grade
Dear
President-Elect
Bill Clinton,
Congratulations! You’re
the new president! Bill I
have a couple questions for
you. What are you going
to do about our education?
Are you going to raise the
thinking level? Or are you
going to lower it? Or keep it
the same? Bill what is going
to happen to the sports?
There’s one more thing
what is going to happen to
taxes?
Kim White
Sixth grade.
P.S. I wish you luck in
the White house. May the
best decisions be yours.
Dear President-Elect Bill
Clinton, Congratulations!
for being picked for presi-
dent “93” I am really proud
that you got elected. I hope
you will lower taxes. And
that if you could try and
put people on the streets in
homes and that way if you
lower taxes the poor people
could pay taxes. I am really
glad now that in Hermiston
Oregon we have new base-
ball fi elds because I love
playing baseball. I even
wish that there were NO
drugs in the whole entire
world so that know one
would get killed and that
there were no guns to peo-
ple like that the only peo-
ple who should have guns
are the hunters not poach-
ers. Well hope you have fun
being president.
Your friend,
Starr McCoy
Sixth grade
50 YEARS AGO
It is the policy of the Hermiston Herald to correct errors as soon as they
are discovered. Incorrect information will be corrected on Page 2A. Errors
commited on the Opinion page will be corrected on that page. Corrections
also are noted in the online versions of our stories.
Please contact the editor at editor@hermistonherald.com or call (541) 564-
4533 with issues about this policy or to report errors.
DECEMBER 7, 1967
•Customers of Pacifi c
Power Light Company in
Hermiston, Stanfi eld, Echo
and Umatilla were without
SENIOR LIVING SOLUTIONS
A Place for Mom has helped over one million families find
senior living solutions that meet their unique needs.
power for 44 minutes. The
interruption in service was
caused by damage to the
main 69,000-volt transmis-
sion line serving these com-
munities from Kennewick.
A power pole near Kenne-
wick caught fi re and sev-
ered a section of line as it
fell. The fi re may have been
started by gun shots to an
insulator.
•Drilling has reached
a depth of 560 feet on the
new city well. Site of the
new well is in the north-
east section of the city
where offi cials are hop-
ing for a producing well of
2,000 gallons per minute at
the 1,000 foot level. J.A.
Strasser Co. of Portland
has the $59,327.50 drilling
contract.
75 YEARS AGO
DECEMBER 10,1942
•The most recent Herm-
iston business fi rm casu-
alty of the war is the Pheas-
ant Café, one of the larger
cafés of this city. The fi rm
has been opened for the past
six weeks by Mr. and Mrs.
Claude VanArsdale who
had purchased the business
from Ben O’Conner. The
VanArsdales relinquished
their equity, however, on
Sunday and Mr. O’Conner
decided to close it indefi -
nitely. Mr. O’Conner stated
that he might open again
around the fi rst of March,
depending on the conditions
of the war. He also plans to
close the Pastime after the
fi rst of the year.
•A considerable letup in
petty crimes and drunken-
ness has been experienced
here in the last two weeks,
Extra Space
For the Holidays!
Holiday Special!
20% Off
Solar
Shades !
Offer Expires: 12/31/17
FREE Estimates!
541-720-0772
102 E Columbia Dr.
Kennewick, WA 99336
CALL (855) 864-4711
HH FILE PHOTO
A turkey on Bridge Road may have been breathing a sigh
of relief after passing through the Thanksgiving holiday
without becoming a meal.
Giving the Gift of
The support you need to find quality
There’s no cost to you!
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2017
COMMUNITY
Patio Rooms
Sunrooms · Pergolas
Patio Covers · Solar &
Drop Shades · Awnings
& More!
Call for showroom hours
www.mybackyardbydesign.com
! We’re paid by our partner communities
Imagine The Difference You Can Make
DONATE YOUR CAR
1-844-533-9173
FREE TOWING
TAX DEDUCTIBLE
License #188965
according to records at the
local police station. Exces-
sive liquor still leads the
parade as the chief offender.
•The nine housing units
under construction in Herm-
iston under the sponsorship
of the Hermiston Housing
Corporation are progressing
nicely and should be ready
for occupancy by the fi rst of
the year, providing weather
conditions do not hamper
the work. The last house
was shingled this week and
the doors and windows will
be installed this weekend.
The houses will be sold by
the corporation under the
sponsorship of the Federal
Housing Administration.
Six of the units have been
sold, leaving three available
for any one wishing to pur-
chase a new home.
100 YEARS AGO
DECEMBER 15, 1917
•Poultry must be pro-
duced next year in places
where it has not been pro-
duced before, and every-
where that poultry has
been produced that pro-
duction must be increased.
It is necessary that peo-
ple in the country and in
towns answer alike to this
call. Farms and backyards
must both do their bit, for
the doubling of our poul-
try production next year is
an indispensable item in
the nation’s food produc-
tion program — a program
which must be carried out
if we are to win the war.
The meat supplies avail-
able for European use are
short. Meat must be sup-
plied if the war is won by
the forces who fi ght for
freedom. The war will be
won if we fail in food pro-
duction — but not won by
us. We must understand
what will happen if we
do not provide the enor-
mous quantities of food
stuffs that the allies cannot
produce for themselves.
Are we going to feed on
chickens and eggs? Of
course not. But by greatly
increasing our production
of chickens and eggs our-
selves we will, naturally,
eat that much less beef and
pork. In turn, that beef and
pork can be sent to Europe.
The United States Depart-
ment of Agriculture calls
upon the country to dou-
ble poultry production next
year. That can be done if the
farms will keep an average
of 100 hens instead of a 40
hen average, as at present.
• Lera Newton, a trained
nurse of Corvallis, while
in Hermiston on a busi-
ness visit informed The
Herald that she decided to
locate permanently at Irri-
gon, where her mother Mrs.
Delle Newton lives. With
the coming of the lady a
long felt want will have
been fulfi lled in this project,
for hereafter those desir-
ing the services of a nurse
can secure Miss Newton by
addressing her at Irrigon,
Oregon.
•A new agricultural
industry has been started
in this government project
this year that is destined to
become a money-making
factor and rank with alfalfa,
dairying and other diver-
sifi ed farming items. We
have all heard, both in verse
and rhyme, of the waving
fi elds of sorghum cane in
the south, and many here
have witnessed its produc-
tion in those states where it
is grown in abundance, but
none of us evidently ever
conceived the idea that the
cereal plant would thrive
this far north. This was in
part caused by ranchers
having become inoculated
with a desire to raise alfalfa,
stock and vegetables, with
the result that they had no
time to give attention to sci-
entifi c researches for the
production of any foreign
agricultural product.
STUDENT
OF THE
WEEK
Sadie Wilson
Senior - Griswold High School
Griswold High School is proud to name Sadie
Wilson as its Student of the Week. Sadie is a senior
at Griswold High School. She is a member of FBLA,
National Honor Society and is the current ASB Vice-
President. She is also an all-around athlete lettering
in volleyball, basketball and track! At the Old
Oregon League District Volleyball Tournament this
year Sadie Wilson was selected 1st team All-District
and made the All-Tournament District Team. She
has done all of this while maintaining a 4.0 GPA.
Congratulations Sadie and keep up the good work!
Proudly Sponsored By:
Proudly Sponsored By:
Mid Columbia Producers, Inc.
Help Prevent Blindness
Get A Vision Screening Annually
Ask About A FREE 3 Day
Vacation Voucher To Over
20 Destinations!!!
345 N. 1st Place, Hermiston, OR 97838
541-289-5015 • www.mcpcoop.com