Hermiston herald. (Hermiston, Or.) 1994-current, March 07, 2015, Image 3

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    SATURDAY, MARCH 7, 2015
HERMISTONHERALD.COM • A3
COMMUNITY
Area school districts encourage students to read
BY MAEGAN MURRAY
HERMISTON HERALD
Schools across the na-
tion celebrated Dr. Seuss’
birthday this week through
Read Across America
Week, and many, including
those in Hermiston, Stan-
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used the opportunity to in-
spire in students a love for
reading.
Students at all elemen-
tary schools in the region
could be seen wearing their
Cat in the Hat red and white
striped hats and reading a
Dr. Seuss book or two to
express their love of the
classic tales, while also
exploring other genres of
books.
In Hermiston, four of
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held events, from themed
dress-up days to scheduled
reading times to activities
after school, where students
got to read a book with their
families while also partici-
pating in a variety of arts
and crafts. The other Herm-
iston elementary school,
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School, will celebrate Read
Across America Week be-
ginning Monday.
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tary teacher Holly Moss
said celebrating the week is
important because reading
is the avenue for success.
“Finding ways to cele-
brate the love of reading is
MAEGAN MURRAY PHOTO
MAEGAN MURRAY PHOTO
Kindergarten student Tyler Bampbell recites a passage from Cat in the Hat Thursday after-
noon during a Dr. Seuss-themed assembly at Echo School for Read Across America Week as
Àrst-grader Emily Rose Zatches and Echo teacher Brytni 2Zen holds a book.
important,” she said. “Read
Across America is exciting
because the students are in-
troduced to authors and sto-
ries they might not choose
on their own, like Dr. Seuss.
Hopefully, this will motivate
them to continue reading
long after their elementary
school days are over.”
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each elementary school held
school-wide
assemblies,
where they completed a va-
riety of Dr. Seuss-themed
activities ranging from the
reading of tongue twisters
to acting out skits inspired
by their favorite books.
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through the gym and partic-
ipated in a read-off contest.
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School, students got a visit
from Cat in the Hat, him-
self, during their school-
wide assembly Thursday.
Students also ate a helping
of green eggs and ham for
lunch on Monday and cel-
ebrated a drop-everything-
and-read day. The library
had a variety of activities
Cat in the Hat made a special guest appearance during the
StanÀeld Elementary School assembly celebrating Read
Across America Week Thursday afternoon.
to suit every grade level
throughout the week.
“Reading is and can be
fun,” librarian Susan Dicks
said. “It’s all about promot-
ing the fun and different
types of books (Dr. Seuss)
has.”
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tilla, students had a variety
of dress-up days, and then
on Thursday, had a Dr. Se-
uss parade, where they also
MAEGAN MURRAY PHOTO
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after their favorite Dr. Se- Echo Elementary School students dance to a Dr. Seuss song
Thursday during an assembly for Read Across America Week.
uss books.
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BY MAEGAN MURRAY
HERMISTON HERALD
The city of Stanfield
and a housing developer
hope to come to an agree-
ment on how to finance
the extension of a road
in Stanfield so 12 new
houses can be built on the
north end of town.
Timothy Hophan, own-
er of Silver Ridge Homes,
was well on his way to
constructing the first
phase of housing in the
city, but the project stalled
when he realized how
much it was going to cost
to extend Maimie Street.
Stanfield City Manager
Blair Larsen said Hophan
originally budgeted the
road extension to cost
about $80,000, but, upon
further research, he found
the road would cost about
$180,000.
Larsen said the city
and Hophan had a previ-
ous arrangement where,
in exchange for extending
the street, Silver Ridge
Homes would receive
12 system development
charge credits. SDCs are
a latecomer’s fee devel-
opers pay to reimburse
the city for existing in-
frastructure. Larsen said a
portion of the fees also go
toward future infrastruc-
ture that will serve the
new development.
If the city were to re-
quire Hophan to extend
the road for his housing
development,
Hophan
would have to abandon
the project, Larsen told
the City Council Tuesday.
Larsen said, as a pos-
sible way to keep the
project on track, he and
Hophan have been dis-
cussing setting up an
account
for
Hophan
with the city so, for ev-
ery house the developer
builds, a portion of the
funds that would normal-
ly go to SDCs would be
set aside in a trust to be
used for the road exten-
Church
Directory
sion.
“He
has
verbally
agreed, in principal, to the
idea,” Larsen said. “When
there is enough money to
construct the road, they
would go ahead and do it.
If there was any left over,
it could go back into the
SDC fund from there.”
Larsen said he feels the
idea benefits both the city
and Silver Ridge Homes
because it allows Hophan
to continue building and
it protects the city in case
he abandons the project.
He said he is checking
with the city’s attorney to
make sure the plan is le-
gal and viable.
Mayor Thomas Mc-
Cann said he feels the city
should pursue the idea
because Stanfield needs
more housing.
“My opinion is I think
it is worth the continued
negotiation,” he said.
Councilman
Jason
Sperr said he supports
the idea, but he thinks the
city needs to hold Silver
Ridge Homes to a time
frame to ensure the city
isn’t wasting its resourc-
es.
He said he also thinks
if the developer could
dedicate more money than
just the cost of the SDC
per house built, which
runs at $5,400, that would
benefit the city. He said
that would also reduce
the amount of SDC waiv-
ers Silver Ridge Homes
would receive from the
city.
Larsen said that is a
possibility he can explore.
“If his normal opera-
tions would involve spend-
ing an additional $42,000,
or $3,000 per lot, on road
access, then perhaps we
can include something
like that where he would
put in a larger amount like
$7,000 or $7,500,” Lars-
en said. “It would make it
accrue faster and it would
be less SDCs that the city
would lose.”
Larsen said the road
extension isn’t absolutely
necessary right now, but
it would be eventually.
EAT-SHOP-PLAY
Exploring Pendleton,
Milton-Freewater, Mission,
Pilot Rock & Walla Walla
Supporting local businesses, will also
support members of your own community
that pay taxes, serve on committees,
teach our children, and serve our needs.
Every dollar that is spent locally helps
retain our local businesses, and benefits
the future of our community.
DG gifts & Screen Printing
430 SW 2nd Street, Pendleton, OR 97801
541-966-0974
www.dggifts.com
Elite Guns & Bows
213 SE 2nd, Pendleton OR 97801
541-276-1243
Mon. - Fri. 9am-6pm, Sat. 9am-3pm
NEW BEGINNINGS
CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Worship Service 10:30 AM
Sunday School 9:00 AM
Kelly Lumber Supply Inc.
Pastor J.C. Barnett
Children's Church
& Nursery Available
1211 Tutuilla Road, Pendleton, OR 97801
541-278-4446
www.kellylumber.com
“Proud to Support our Community”
700 West Orchard Avenue
P.O. Box 933
Hermiston, Oregon
541-289-4774
Seventh-day
Adventist Church
s h i
W o r
Saturdays
Sabbath School . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:30 a.m.
Worship Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11:00 a.m.
p w i t h u s !
1255 Hwy. 395 S. • 567-5834
oasisvineyard.us
Worship 9:30 AM
"come as you are"
The Full Gospel
Home Church
235 SW 3rd
Phone 567-7678
Rev. Ed Baker - Rev. Nina Baker
Sunday: Sunday School . . . . . 10:00 am
Worship . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11:00 am
Evening Service . . . . . . 7:00 pm
Wednesday Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:00 pm
First United
Methodist
Church Of
Hermiston
Rev. Dr. James T. Pierce, Pastor
Open Hearts, Open minds,
Open doors
"Casting all your care upon him;
for he careth for you."
1 Pet. 5:7
191 E. Gladys Ave.
Sunday Worship at 11am
(541) 567-3002
Our Lady of Angels
Catholic Church
Grace Baptist Church
565 W. HERMISTON AVE.
DAILY MASS: Monday-Friday
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . English 7:00 am
THURSDAY . . . . . . . . . Spanish 6:00 pm
SATURDAY: . . . . . . . . . English 5:00 pm
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Spanish 7:00 pm
SUNDAY: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . English 9:00 am
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bilingual 11:00 am
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Spanish 1:00 pm
OFFICE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 567-5812
NEW HOPE
COMMUNITY CHURCH
1350 S. Hwy. 395, Hermiston
"People Making A Difference"
Sunday Worship Services
9:00 am, 10:45 am
Classes for kids during both
Services en Español
Dave Andrus, Pastor
For more information call
567-8441
First Christian
Church
"Proclaiming the Message of
Hope, Living the Gospel of Love"
SUNDAY WORSHIP 10:45 AM
SUNDAY SCHOOL 9:30 AM
CHILDREN'S CHURCH 11:00 AM
Nursery Provided
567-3013
775 W. Highland Ave., Hermiston
St. Johns
Episcopal Church
Kelly Lumber Supply
All People
Are Welcome
Scripture, Tradition
and Reason
Family service 9am Sunday
Gladys Ave & 7th Hermiston
Fr. Dan Lediard, Priest. PH: 567-6672
LANDMARK BAPTIST
CHURCH
555 SW 11th, Hermiston
567-9497
Nursery provided for all services
Sunday School - 9:30 AM
Worship - 10:45 AM
6:00 pm
Wed Prayer & Worship - 7:00 PM
“Proclaiming God’s word,
growing in God’s grace”
Allan Payne, Pastor
567-8241
855 W. Highland • Hermiston






 


 

125 E. Beech Ave. • 567-3232
Pastor David Dever
Sun. Bible Classes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10:00am
Sun. Worship Service . . . . . . . . . . 11:00am
Sun. Evening Worship . . . . . . . . . . 6:00pm
Wed. Prayer & Bible Study . . . 6:00pm
DG gifts & Screen Printing
www.hermistonlmbc.com
To share your worship times
call Amanda Jacobs
541-278-2683
Elite Guns & Bows