The Hermiston herald. (Hermiston, Or.) 19??-1984, August 09, 1934, Page 3, Image 3

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    LOOK!
FARM CO-OPERATIVE DIVISION
A MESSAGE
SERIES OF MEETINGS PLANNED
BY PROJECT FARM BUREAU.
At a recent Umatilla Project
Farm Bureau executive committee
meeting a tentative program for the
ensuing year was proposed and dis-
cussed, It was decided to have each
project leader formulate one pro­
gram in keeping with his project or
community good, more meetings to
follow if advisable. The idea is al-
so to have these programs with
educational and community better­
ment as the goal in view.
Of course this will also have
amusement, recreation and eats. Dr.
Beletski has volunteered to start
the first of a series of such meet­
ing. Notice these columns careful­
ly for further information on this
matter.
If it will be of value is up to each
individual member.
TWO OREGON RAM SALES TO
BE SPONSORED THIS YEAR.
Two Oregon ram sales instead of
one are to be sponsored this year by
the Oregon Wool Growers associa­
tion, announces W. A. Holt, county
agent of Umatilla county and secre­
tary of the body. The annual Pen­
dleton sale will be held this year
August 26 and 27. It will be fol­
lowed by another and similar sale
at Klamath Falls September 17 and
18.
Leading breeders from all parts
of the state consign rams to these
sales where buyers from some sec­
tions of California and Washington
as well as Oregon go to make their
annual purchases. Colonel Thomp­
son of Lincoln, Nebraska, one of the
most famous livestock auctioneers in
the country, will do the selling this
year. These ram sales are an im-
portant factor in improving the
sheep industry of the northwest.
say livestock specialists of the state
college extension service.
O.S.C. EXTENSION LEADER
ON LEAVE AIDING NEW DEAL
Another Oregon State college spe-
cialist has been “d-afted” by the
federal government to assist in for-
mulcting and carrying out new leal
plans for the country as a whole.
This time Miss Clarlbel Nye, state
leader of home economic extension,
has been called to Washington for
two or three months to assist as
technical advisor on home projects
under the Federal Emergency Re­
lief administration.
Miss Nye’s work in representing
the extension service in cooperating
with the Oregon Relief committee
attracted the attention of the na­
tional leaders and resulted in the
request for her assistance. While
she is on leave Mrs. Mabel Mack,
home demonstration agent in Jack­
son county, will serve as acting
slate leader.
E. L. Potter, head of the agricul-
tural economics department at the
college, who assisted in working out
the present cattle purchasing plan,
has returned from Washington, D.C.
and Roger Morse, extension dairy-
man, returned early in August af-
ter six months on special work for
the dairy section of the AAA.
CANNING TOMATOES PRICE SET
BY MARKETING AGREEMENT.
A minimum price of 311.25 per
ton. delivered, for canning toma-
toes contracted for after August 2nd
was agreed on. in a meeting between
the control committee of the Ore­
gon-Washington Melon and Tomato
Marketing Agreement and delegates
representing 80% of the tomato
canning in the two states, at a
meeting in the Imperial Hotel, Port­
land, Oregon, on Thursday, August
2nd.
The price of 311.25 per ton is for
field run tomatoes excluding culls.
Contracts previously entered Into
between growers and canners will
not be disturbed, according to Mor-
ton Tompkins, chairaran of the Con-
trol Committee. A tax of 35c per
ton to cover costs of supervision of
the agreement was levied by the
board. This tax will be deducted
by the canners from growers' checks
and sent to the agreement. Under
the Agricultural Adjustment Asts by
the two states, the Oregon-Washing­
ton Melon end Tomato Marketing
Agreement Control Committee Is
empowered to set minimum prices
on al! melons and tomatoes sold in
Oregon and Washington.
Those representing the growers
on the joint control committee
were: Morton Tompkins, chairman.
Dayton. Oregon ; C. Wesley Wil-
liams, Roseburg, Oregon; H. N.
Hampton, Kennewick. Washington;
C. H. Dills, Wapato. Washington,
PAGE THREW
THE HERMISTON HERALD, HERMISTON, OREGON
THURSDAY, AUGUST », 1934
TO
E^ERY MEMBER.
CANNING SCHEDULE.
AUGUST 13 to 18
P. M.—1 to 3:30
Monday A. M,— Tomatoes, No.
2Y8; P. M.. Corn No. 2‘s.
Tuesday—Beans, 8 to 10; Toma-
toes 10 to 12, No. 2s; Corn, P. M.,
No. 2s.
Wednesday A. M. — Beans No.
2‘s; P. M. Corn No. 21s.
Thursday A. M.— Tomatoes No.
21s; P. M., Fruit No. 21s.
Friday A. M. — Beans No. 2s,
Corn No. 2s.
Saturday—A. M. Chicken.
NO PATRONAGE
FOR SALE, A NEW $2500.00
REFUND PAID
DELINQUENT MEMBERS
Accordlng to the by-laws
governing the Co-operative Ser­
vice Station, no patronage re­
fund can be made to any mem­
ber who has allowed his mem­
bership to become delinquent.
Information as to the status
of any membership is available
at the main office of the Farm
Bureau Co-operative.
TURKEY GROWERS TO HOLD
FIELD TOURS IN COUNTIES.
A series of eight turkey tours to
study problems of turkey production
and management and consider the
turkey outlet for the coming season
have been organized by Oregon
county agents in cooperation with
turkey growers of nine counties this
summer.
Tours yet to be held are Linn
county, August 15, Marion, August
16, Umatilla, Augusut 18, and
Yamhill, August 21. The first half
of the series, completed during July,
included tours in Lane, Douglas, De­
schutes and Crook counties.
A picnic lunch at noon followed
by a speaking program is a feature
of each tour. Among the speakers
are H. E. Cosby, extension specialist
in poultry husbandry; Clyde C. Ed­
mond, executive vice-president of
the Northwestern Turkey Growers’
association of Salt Lake City; and
J. C. Leedy, manager of the Oregon
Turkey Cooperatives, Inc. A. Wil-
lardson, sales agent of the North­
western Turkey Growers' associa-
tion at Los Angeles, will also attend
the August tours to discuss turkey
marketing.
The Umatilla county tour is spon­
sored by the Eastern Oregon Turkey
Growers’ association, and will start
at the branch experiment station at
Hermiston, where results of feeding
experiments will be observed. The
Yamhill county tour will start from
Newberg.
DANGERS OF BANKRUPTCY
ACT FOR FARMS EXPLAINED.
Recent additional Information re-
garding the Frazier-Lemke amend­
ment to the Federal Bankruptcy
laws designed to enable a farmer to
go into bankruptcy ae a means of
retaining possession of a debt-ridden
farm, tends to confirm the early
opinion that this is in the nature of
a “club behind the door” and is
something which will not be used
to advantage by many farmers. This
is the opinion of L. R. Breithaupt,
extension agricultural economist at
Oregon State college, who is also
secretary of the Oregon Agricutural
Advisory council.
Mr. Breithaupt recently supplied
all county farm debt adjustment
committeemen with a complete ana­
lysis’ of the farm bankruptcy act re­
cently appearing in the National
Grange Monthly. "It is noteworthy
that county farm debt adjustment
committees are still regarded as the
best bet for farm debtors who need
help in adjusting and refinancing
their indebtedness,” says Mr. Breit­
haupt. "Their work is expected to
increase rather than decrease as a
result of this amendment."
The article in the National
Grange Monthly points out that in
the overwhelming majority of cases
voluntary conciliation by a local
farm debt adjustment committee
still offers the foreclosure-threaten­
ed farmer the easiest and surest
means of holding onto his farm and
home. ’ During the past year these
debt adjustment committees have
provided solutions for more‘debtor-
creditor conflicts than any other
means of settlement.
Although there are some attrac­
tive prospects indicated by a casual
perusal of the bankruptcy amend-
ment, it holds many serions dangers
for any farmer, the article contin-
ues. A six year purchase plan is
one provision and a rental plan of
settlement is another, but the pros-
CAR, NEVER BEEN RUN, FOR
$812.64
pects are that any farmer taking
the bankruptcy route may find him-1
self farming under the jurisdiction
Just think, a car marked down
of a court.
75%—What would you think
Either way out under bankruptcy
if you saw such an ad?
the farmer will have good sized
payments to meet, he must pay in- |
This is what you get in the Ford
terest and principal or annual ren- |
V-8. Features that you will find
tai and all taxes. The court pro­
only in the 32500.00 car. The V
bably may also require the farmer
to keep up full insurance on all type engine—No other manufactu­
rer of any low priced car uses this
buildings and will hold him respon­
type of engine—the very heart of
sible for any deterioration of the
any car.
property.
Certainly, it will not pay the far­
mer to flirt with bankruptcy where
he has any equity at all left in his
property. Meanwhile, the county
farm debt adjustment committees
are adjusting the debts of an in­
IF IT ISN’T A V-8,
creasing number of farmers, even
those whose equity in their property
IT’S OUT OF DATE.
is near the vanishing point, the ar­
ticle concludes.
NOTICE
TO
THE
DAIRY
BUTTER INDUSTRY.
AND
ROHRMAN
Motor Co
against Peer Bokish and Sylvia Bo­
kish. his wife, J. H. Raley. J. R.
Raley and H. J. Warner as defen­
Big City Girl Revue” has been dants whereby said plaintiffs did
booked for two shows at the Oasis recover a personal decree and judg­
theatre, The troop includes "Sally” ment against the defendants. Peer
the fan dancer, Jay Thomas Hard- Bokish snd Sylvia L. Bokish, his
ing the popular song writer, Verle wife, for the sum of »400.00 with
Yvonne, an acrobatic dancer. Slip- interest thereon at the rate of 8 per
pery Slim the escape artist, Tex Pe- cent per annum from February 12,
1932; the further sum of »95.00 at-
terson the Texas Cowboy who wi
yodel your blues away, and Thetorney’s fees and the costs and dis-
bursements of said suit taxed at
Three Cornets, tap dancers.
The picture, “She Learned About 325.70, and whereby It was decreed
Sailors”, with Lew Ayres and Alice that the mortgage dated on the
Faye, is a comedy drama which por­ 12th day of February, 1930, execu­
ted by Peer Bokish and Sylvia L.
trays the love life of a sailor.
Boklsh, his wife, to plaintiffs, upon
•I the following described real proper-
ty in Umatilla County, Oregon, to-
t UMATILLA NEWS t wit:
Lot Six in Block Seventy in
By Louise Byrnes
the Reservation Addition to Pendle­
Mrs. Eugene McFarland is cook­ ton, Umatilla County, Oregon, which
ing for harvesters near Athena.
mortgage was recorded in book 94,
The 4-H club girls met at the page 447 of the records of mortga­
church Wednesday of last week. ges In the office of the County Re­
About 20 of the Hermiston club corder of Umatilla County, Oregon,
girls met with them.
should be foreclosed and the said
Miss Yvonne Bousquet returned real property sold by the Sheriff of
Tuesday of last week from Condon. Umatilla County. Oregon, to satisfy
Paul Walsh, accompanied by Mr. said judgment and all costs; there­
and Mrs. O. P. Miller, motored to fore I will on Monday, the 10th day
Walla Walla Wednesday of last of September, 1934, at two o’clock
week.
In the afternoon of that day at the
W. O. Miller returned to his home front door of the County Court
last week after a short visit in Houuse in the City of Pendleton,
Portland.
Umatilla County. Oregon, sell all the
V. D. Bramer spent the week end right, title, interest and estate
in Umatilla.
which the said defendants, Peer Bo­
Miss Sybil Macomber and Louise kish and Sylvia L. Bokish, his wife,
Byrnes spent the week end in and all persons claiming and to
Boardman visiting Miss Maycomb­ claim by. through or under them,
er’s parents, Mr. and Mrs. Nate Ma- or either of them, had on the 12th
comber.
day of February, 1930, or since then
Mr. and Mrs. K. A. Beebe are have had, or now have. In and to
parents of a 9 pound baby girl born the above described real property,
last week at Pendleton. She has and every part thereof, at public
been named Kathryn Ailleen. Mrs. auction to the highest bidder for
Beebee is the former Alma Caldwell. cash in hand, the proceeds of such
The regular C. E. meeting was sale to be applied in satisfaction of
held on the school lawn Sunday said execution and all costs.
evening with Devee Brown as leader.
Dated this 8th day of August,
Vernon McCullough is visiting his
aunt, Mrs. Elmer Newman in Mil­ 1934.
ton.
R. E. GOAD, Sheriff of Uma-
Mrs. Ben Spencer, who recently
underwent an operation for appendi­
citis, is at home again.
Kenneth McMillan spent Sunday
at the home of his brother E. A.
McMillian.
Mr. and Mrs. Eugene McFarland
and Herb Land who are employed
near Athena, spent the week end
with friends.
Rosemary McCullough, daughter
W. J. WARNER
of Mr. and Mrs. C. C. McCullough,
underwent an operation for appendi­
Attorney-at-Law
citis Tuesday.
Mrs. Ervin Petite was taken to
Hermiston - Oregon
Portland Wednesday of last week
for medical attention.
Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Armstrong of
Spokane spent Sunday at the O. P.
W. L. Morgan, D. M. D.
Miller home.
General Dentistry
Miss Naomi Brownell of Portland
X-Ray and Diagnosis
Is visiting her sister Mrs. Ervin
Chapman.
Phone 9-J
Bank Bldg.
Elton Fromdahl and Everett Er­
Residence Phone 25-J
vin. who are employed at Meacham,
Sunday and Evenings by
spend the week end here.
Appointment
Lute Cramer of The Dalles spent
Friday and Saturday at the Harvey
home. He was accompanied on the
return trip by Art and Jim Burwlck
who have been visiting here.
A. W. CHRISTOPHERSON
Barbara Root of Portland is visit-
ing her parents, Mr. and Mrs. M.
Physician and Surgeon.
Root.
Mr. and Mrs. Paul Walsh and
Bank Building
daughter Verna Dale and Mr. and
Mrs. O. P. Miller motored to Walla Office Hours
8-12 and 2-5
Walla Monday.
STAGE SHOW AT OASIS
ON FRIDAY, AUGUST 10.
The Federal Food and Drugs Act,
PHONE 571
which is applicable to interstate
shipments of food products, defines
HERMISTON, OREGON
a food as adulterated, among other
conditions, if it be filthy, decom­
posed or putrid. In the enforcement
of this statute the Food and Drug
Administration has encouraged ship
ments of both butter and cream
adulterated in this respect. Action
has been taken under the law
against such shipments. Not only
are consignments of adulterated WANTED—TO BUY SMALL TRACT
dairy products subject to seizure,
of land near Hermiston. Write
but the responsible shippers are lia­ Albert Harper, Freewater, Ore.
ble to criminal prosecution under
50-ltp
the law.
It is evident that the objection- HOUSEHOLD GOODS FOR SALE—
Second house west of Catholic
able conditions responsible tor the
adulteration are largely the result church on Hermiston avenue.50-ltc
of carelessness in the handling of HOUSE FOR RENT FOR SMALL
cream itself at various stages from
family. Will furnish good water.
the time of production up to its W. T. Knapp. Hermiston, Ore.50-2tp
manufacture into butter, and that
the condition of the butter itself is PEACH HARVEST IS OVER AT
traceable to the unfit character of
Edmond's Orchard and we thank
the cream used in its manufacture. you for your patronage. Fred Ed-
50-ltp
Producers, shippers and users of monds.
cream are warned that precautions
should immediately be taken by WANTED—PIANO TO USE FOR
storage or will pay nominal rent.
every agency concerned, from the
producer of the cream to the ulti­ Inquire Co-op Service Station.50-ltc
mate manufacturer and shipper of LIVESTOCK WANTED — CATTLE
the butter, to correct this situation.
Sheep and Hogs. L. J. Huston,
The Administration has observed The Dalles, Oregon. Write me or
with approval the steps taken by leave name at Hale's Confectionery
various branches of the industry for
50-8tp
improvement. These steps are es-
sentisi, but to be effective must be PRUNES FOR SALE—JAMES ED-
die, Fourth Unit, Hermiston. Ore-
participated in by each and every
49-3tp
branch of the industry, including gon.
cream producers, cream purchasers,
cream receivers and shippers, and CASH PAID FOR POULTRY AND
eggs. R. C. Todd, two doors east
creameries.
49-4tc
1. Cream, and milk from which of Pennock’s garage
it comes, must be protected at every SWIFT & CO.—BUYERS OF POUL-
stage from
contamination with
try and Eggs. A. M. Smith, Her-
filth. Sculpulous cleanliness of per- miston, Ore., Agent.
271tfc
son and surroundings, containers
and equipment, is a governing fac- CANNING PEACHES, 3c AT THE
orchard. W. T. Bray, Umatilla,
tor at all stages in the production
4 6-Aug. 30
and handling of sound wholesome Oregon.
cream as in the case of any product
SECOND HAND SUIT FOR SALE—
intended for human food.
Quick Cleaners, Hermiston. 48-tfc
2. Containers and utensils of all
NOTICE OF SHERIFFS SALE.
kinds used In connection with milk­ FOR SALE- 11x16 PLASTERED
ing and with the separation, storage
cabin. Cheap. S. L. Carson, Her-
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
and transportation of cream through miston, Ore.
48-tfc under and by virtue of a writ of ex­
every stage up to and including its
ecution issued out of the Circuit
manufacture into butter, must be of eau of Dairy Industry which, upon Court of the State of Oregon, in and
such construction as to permit of request, will be ghd to offer more for the County of Umatilla, under
thorough cleansing and to insure ef­ detailed suggestions to anyone en­ the seal thereof, and to me directed
fective protection of the milk or gaged In the production and hand­ and delivered, upon a judgment and
cream against entry of dust, dirt, ling of cream or butter.
decree rendered and entered in said
files or other insects, rats, mice or
W. G. CAMPBELL. Chief Court on the 1st day of August,
other animals, or any other foreign
of Food and Drug Admin­ 1934, in favor of J. T. Dowell and
material.
Cora B. Dowell, his wife, and
istration.
3. Cleansing should immediately
follow the emptying of the parti­
cular container or the use of the
particular equipment. The main­
tenance of the cleanliness and pro­
tection from dirt and filth of empty
containers or equipment not in use
VASTLY PIFFERGNT th goar
must be insured.
4 Cream must be kept cool. This
means temperatures below 50 de-
A New Deal• ana this 25e ineludes free general
grees F. This applies to every step
(usually soc) to the combined Night Show at the grandstand— buteverybody
in its storage and transportation,
payo—ne passes printed. Attend daily, help break attendance records-
Methods and devices which are
Agriculture, Horticulture, Livestock, 4-H Clubs, Industry.
practicable for the purpose will vary
under different circumstances.
Thoroughbred Racing: “rena
Where it is impossible to control
the temperature of storage rooms or
transportation vehicles, cooling of
Free Double Night Show cireur *............. devile.
containers by the use of wet cloths
should be restored to.
Rucking Brahmas from Tesaci longhorn bulldogging steers from Mexico;
5. Frequent deliveries of cream
and avoidance of mixing different
lots will facilitate Its arrival at
4... A different pyretechnic program each night—not Just dre-
creameries In the best possible con­
DKld. works. Entertainingly thrilling—beau tifull y impressive. Do
dition.
These
fundamental
principles
should have the serious attention of
Rainproof Fair
the entire industry and should be
SHINE.
closely and studiously observed as
a means of correcting unaatisfac-
Admission to Grounds:
tory conditions now existing, and
obviating the necessity for prosecu­
—all alike.
tions under the Food and Drug Act.
They are submitted with the con­
currence and approval of the Bur-
WANT ADS
So be there
zea.chuerer
tilla County, Oregon.
By J. A. Carney, Deputy.
(August 9 - Sept. 6)
TAKEN UP NOTICE.
Notice is hereby given that I
have taken up and have kept for
about ten days at C. H. Madden's,
on Ralph Stanfield ranch on Butter
Creek, 8 miles up Butter Creek
highway from Hermiston, the fol­
lowing described animals:
(Descriptive brands are only simi-
lar to actual brand on animal)
1 bay horse, 7 brand on left hip.
1 bay mare. G? brand on left hip
1 dark bay mare, 7 brand on
right hip.
1 black mare mule G brand on
left hip.
sucking colt.
said animals will be sold, unless
deemed, at public auction to the
highest bidder for cash in hand on
the 24th day of August, 1934, at
the above described ranch at 10:00
o’clock, Friday.
Dated at Hermiston on this Sth
day of August, 1934.
Signed. C. H. MADDEN.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS.
IN THE COUNTY COURT OF THE
STATE OF OREGON FOR UMA-
TILLA COUNTY.
In the Matter of the Estate of
Frank L. Jewett, Deceased.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned has been appointed
administratrix of the estate of
Frank L. Jewett, deceased and has
qualified as the law directs, All
persons having claims against said
estate are required to present the
same to me, at the office of W. J.
Warner, my attorney, in Hermiston,
Oregon, with proper vouchers, with­
in six months from the cate hereof.
Dated this 12th day of July, 1934.
IDA L. JEWETT,
Administratrix.
(July 12 - August 9)
Business and Professional Cards
HERMISTON
Hermiston Beauty Shoppe
Duart Permanent Wave.
Late Appointments by Phono.
Phone 141
DB. A. E. MARBLE
CHIROPRACTOR
Office: Two doors west post office
Office Hours: 3 to 13 - 1:30 to •
Phone 481 — — Hermiston, Ore.
Hermiston Post No. 37 '
Meets first and third
Thursday. Legion Auxil­
iary meets second and
fourth Thursday.
Legion Hall.
PENDLETON
ERNEST GHORMLEY
MEN’S CLOTHING and
LADIES HOSE
301 E. Court St.
Pendleton, Oregon
Phone 326
Office Phone 523
R m . Phone
461
DR. F. L. INGRAM
Dependable Dentistry
Bond Bldg.
Pendleton, Ore.
Manicuring, Marcelling Hot Oil
Shampoo, Fingerwaving, Facials
Realistic Beauty Shop
Finger Wave - 50c and 25e
We Specialize in Permanent
Waving
606 Main St.
Pendleton. Ore.
W. G. FISHER
NEW AND USED FURNITURE
BOUGHT AND SOLD
DR. H. A. NEWTON
Dentist
X-Ray Work
Phone 12
Bowman Hotel BIk.
Phone 198
807 Main St.
Pendleton, Ore.
Pendleton, Oregon
W. J. CLARKE
TO 8ELL OR TRADE YOUR
PROPERTY SEE
Majestic Ranges, Red Jacket
Pumps, Iron Pipe, Nails. Fencing
Phone 21
211-213 E. Court St.
Pendleton, Oregon
HARDWARE
J. W. CLARKE at
G. F. HODGES AGENCY
721 Main St.
Pendleton, Ore.
WE
BRADLEY & SON
Shoe Rebuilders
Specialize in Good Furni­
ture at Lowest Possible
We rebuild shoes with machinery
your shoes ware made on. The
only factory machines In Umatilla
County. Mnil your shoes te us.
We pny the return postage. Bat­
ter shoe repairing for less mon-
ay. Give ua a trial.
Bradlev & Son
Pendleton, Ore.
643 Main St.
Prices
Free Delivery
to your door.
TON,OR