The Hermiston herald. (Hermiston, Or.) 19??-1984, March 14, 1929, Image 1

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    The Hermiston Herald
DIVERSIFIED FARMS
FAY — OPPORTUNITIES
ARE HEKE.
HERMISTON, UMATILLA COUNTY, OREGON, THURSDAY, MARCH 14, 1929
— NUMBER 28
YOL. z z m
SCHOOLS VISITED
III INTEREST OF
CLUB WORK PLANS
GEO. JENKINS, R.
C.
ASPARAGUS REMUNERATIVE
ACCORDING TO REPORT
KUEHN ER
ARE SPEAKERS
Students
in
H erm iston,
BLUE GRASS
SUNSHINE
ÎEAL FOR COWS
Stanfield,
Echo and U m atilla Hear of
Work.
As a preliminary to the beginning
of boys' and girls’ club work tor this
y ar, Geo. H. Jenkins, assistant
county agent, accompanied by R. C.
Kuehner, assistant state club leader,
visited the high schools in Echo,
Stanfield, Hermiston and Umatilla
Thursday, March 7, and talked to the
assembled students in each school
about club work for the coming year.
Mr. Jenkinp reports enthusiasm
and Interest on the part of prospect­
ive workers. The boys and girls in
terested In the projects were asked
to discuss the matter with their par­
ents and to decide which clubs they
they wanted to enter. In the near
future Mr. Jenkins will revisit these
schools for the purpose of organiz­
ing clubs and assisting in the select­
ion of local club leaders.
Last Saturday night club workers
and others interested in the work met
at the Hermiston library to discuss
plans for the coming year. E. L.
Jackson, local club leader, was in
charge of the meeting. Plans for
the purchase of more Hampshire
sheep for the Hermiston sheep club
were made at this time.
According to Mr. Jenkins, anyone
who was not in attendance at this
meeting but who is interested in
joining some club, is advised to get
Into communication with either Mr.
Jackson or himself.
Asparagus growing on the Umatilla
Project can be made a fairly suc­
cessful venture from a remunerative
standpoint, according to figures pre­
sented at the recent Economic agri­
cultural conference here. These sta­
tistics were compiled from the rec­
ords of J. W. McMullen and Charles
Kaiser, both local farmers, who have
had considerable experience with the
grass In the past few years.
Mr. Mullen's crop of 1925, repre­
senting one year old asparagus,
yielded 22 crates per acre which
brought a return of >26.45. The
cost of the crates amounted to >2.20
leaving him a net return of >24.25
per acre.
That year he began cut­
ting the grass on April 6 and made
the last cutting April 27.
The nekt year ninety crates per
acre were cut, bringing him >117.19
with the cost of the crates >9.00, de­
ducted from the total Income. This
192 6 crop represented 26 actual cut­
ting days from March 20 to April 23.
In 1927 the three year old grass
yielded 200 crates to the acre during
the 25 days of cutting. Returns from
this crop amounted to >148.00 with
>16.00 deducted for the cost of the
crates. About 30 per cent of the
1927 crop was number 2 grass, due
largely to the crooked stems, and
much of it brought in no returns at
all.
The first cutting of the four year
old crop in 1928 was on April 15
and the last on May 9. The average
yield per acre was 258 crates repre­
senting a gross return of >237.36
with >20.66 deducted for the crates
the labor return amounting to
>216.70. Of this crop about 64
per cent was classed as number 2.
Mr. Kaiser's figures were for the
last two years only. His two year old
grass in 1927 cut 94 crates to the
acre, bringing a labor return of
>80.05 after deducting for the crates
In 1928 the yield was 153 crates net-
Ing him >160.23 per’ acre.
It is said thaat the greatest loss to
local growers results from late frosts
which prevent an early cutting, and
the earlier cuttings of the asparagus
bring the highest price.
LOCAL LEGION TO SPONSER
SMOKER IN HERMISTON SOON $
♦
Tentative plans for a Bmoker to be
given under the auspices of Hermis­
ton post No. 37 of the American Leg­
ion were made at a meeting of that
organization last Thursday evening.
The date of the event has not as yet
been definitely decided.
Further business at the meeting
had to do with plans for the coming
months. It was announced that the
local poet has recently taken over the
disbursement of the county indigent
fund, an enterprise which Is new to
this organization.
COLUMBIA NEW S NOTES
«
Mr. and Mrs. Henry Thorlson of
Pendleton were Sunday guests at
the home of Mrs. Thorlson's parents,
Mr. and Mrs. O. E. Hunt.
Wallace Spencer and two young­
est daughters and his mother motored
to La Grande over the week end.
Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Addleman of
Pendleton were visitors at the home
of Mr. Addleman's parents, Mr. and
Mrs. R. L. Addleman.
Victor Stockard departed for Wasco
Thursday
and on the following Sun­
HIGH SCHOOL GIRLS GIVE
LICENSE FEES LOWERED
day was married to Alice Morris.
VAUDEVILLE LAST FRIDAY For the coming year Victor will work
on a ranch near Wasco. We all Join
BY LAST LEGISLATURE
In extending our best wishes for suc­
Clever D ancing Acte Feature P re­ cess and happiness.
G aioline Tax Raised From 3 to
sen tation ; Money to go to
Cents; License F ees to he
B asketball Fond.
Due Ju ly 1.
Automobile license fees In Oregon
will be less as a result of the activi­
ties of the 1929 session of the Oregon
legislature, but the gasoline tax will
be 4 cents a gallon instead of three
cents as at present.
After January 1, 1930, the date for
payment of license fees will be July
1 of each year.
Several thousand motor trucks and
busses, classed as commercial and
contract haulers, which have here­
tofore escaped <>ayment of special tax
for their use of highways will be
subject to greatly Increased taxes.
Motorists who Invite others to ride
with them will not be held liable to
guests for damages in case of acci­
dent if the hosts are reasonably care­
ful. in their driving.
Out-of-state motor trucks operating
not more than 20 miles across the
borders of Orgeon will not be requir­
ed to purchase licenses in both states
in which operations are conducted—
providing Oregon's neighboring states
accept Oregon's invitation to recipro­
cate.
Drunken drivers will face fines of
from >100 to >500 and Jail sentences
of from 60 days to six months each
for their first conviction, sad fines
of from >200 to >500 and prison sen­
tences of from one year to five years
each upon their second convictions,
as well as revocation of drivers’ li­
censes and cancellation of motor ve­
hicle license.
And. after July 1, 1931, solid rub­
ber tires will be illegal on Oregon’s
highways.
Entertaining vaudeville acts were
presented under the auspices of the
high school girls' basketball team at
the local theatre last Friday night.
The performance was arranged to
raise money for the basketball fund.
A clever one-act fantasy, The Mak­
er of Dreams, was Interestingly pre­
sented by Jane Warner, Ruth Bensel
and Grace Jackson. For those of the
audience who liked dancing there
were two entertaining numbers, one
a chorus ensemble featuring Core-
lene Duane, Shirley Brownson, Mary
Brownson, Ruth Bensel and Margaret
Bills who proved to be pretty and
graceful dancers, and the other an
act presented by Corelene Duane and
Ruth Bensel. Other numbers on the
program were contributed by Marian
Henderson and Mera Stogsdlll.
The vaudeville was preceded by a
feature picture.
A very delightful party was given
at the Roberts home Saturday night.
The evening w u spent in dancing
and the dim lights from the fireplace
added a touch of hilarity to the eve­
ning, At 12 o'clock refreshments
consisting of sandwiches, cake and
grapejulce was served. Those pres­
ent were Grace Harryman, Agnes
Roberts, Dorothy and Rachel Buell,
Kathryn Rogers, Hugh Roberts, Dick
Upham, Claude Haddox, Edwin
Throop, Emmett Rogers and Floyd
Lynch.
BE USED AT LEGION MEET
Joint R esolution Passed at Last Ses­
sion E xtending This
Courtesy.
ACCOUNT OF LOCAL
GIVEN IN FARM
An article of interest to local peo
pie appears in the March 7 issue of
the Oregon Farmer on the co-opera­
tive laundry maintained by the Farm
Bureau Auxiliary here in Hermiston.
Following are some of the interest­
ing extracts from the story:
“The idea was first presented to
the women of the Hermiston farm
bureau auxiliary by Mrs. Baxter Hut­
chison of Hermiston. A committee,
consisting of Mrs. Hutchison, Mrs.
Cecil Madden and Mrs. F. M. Out­
wits, was apointed to see what could
be done.
“For a starter they found that the
Hermiston Creamery company bad a
storeroom which they might use.
The creamery also connected them
up with cold water and agreed to
furnish the steam to heat the
water. Then they found that the
Umatilla Project Farm bureau would
lend them the money without interest
to buy an electric washing machine
and wringer.
Delegates to the eleventh annual
department of the American Legion
will be extended certain privileges
that are unique in the annals of the
American Legion. The state of Ore­
gon, by legislative act, has accorded
the department the use of the Senate
Chamber and the Hall of Represen­
tatives for business sessions August
8, 9 and 10.
Following is a copy of Senate
Joint resolution No. 9 embodying this
courtesy:
Introduced by Senators Bailey of
Lane, Kiddle and Klcpper and read
February 5, 1929.
Whereas the eleventh annual con­
vention of the department of Oregon
American Legion, will be held in
Salem, Oregon, August 8, 9 and 10,
1929, and
Whereas the annual American Leg­
ion convention is attended by vete­
rans of the world war from ail parts
of the Btate of Oregon; and
HIGH SCHOOL JUNIORS TO
Whereas the American Legion
helps to foster and perpetuate Ameri­
GIVE “THREE LIVE GHOSTS”
canism and good government; and
Whereas it would be fitting that
Practice for the junior play of the
the state of Oregon tender to the de­
high
school, “Three Live Ghosts
partment of Oregon, American Leg­
ion, the use of the legislative halls which will be presented March 22, is
progressing rapidly, and the cast will
in the statehouse for the business
be
ready for an interesting perform­
sessions of their annual convention;
ance at that time.
therefore
The play has an interesting theme
Be it resolved by the senate of the
state of Oregon, the house of repre­ centering about three young mean
who carry the title role. One of the
sentatives jointly concurring:
That the secretary of state of the ghosts is Spoofy, a shell-shocked Eng-
state of Oregon be and be hereby is lishhman who Is an artist at. picking
instructed to extend to the depart­ up things wh'th bel ng to nth its
ment of Oregon, American Legion, One of his co.-n n i '. j ' is is William Fus-
the use of the senate chamber and alias Bill Jones, an American whose
house on August 8, 9 and 10, 1929, past is better unknown to others than
for the business sessions of the himself. The third ghost is Jimmy,
eleventh annual American Region
who sticks to his pals thnugh all
convention.
their adventures.
COMMUNITY CLUB
TO MEET MARCH 19
CARD BENEFIT SWELLS FUND
FOR LIBRARY IMPROVEMENT
E leven Tables in
SPECIAL MEETING AT 3 P.M.
P lay
at
Party
W ednesday N ig h t; $23.50
Cleared.
A special meeting of the Commun­
ity Club of this city will be held
Tuesday, March 19, at the library
building at 3 o'clock for the purpose
of discussing the donation of funds
for the Improvement of the library
grounds. All members of the or­
ganization are requested and urged
to be present at this very Important
meeting.
The fund for the improvement of
the library lawn was swelled by
>23.60 as a result of the benefit card
party at the library Wednesday
where eleven tables of bridge were in
play throughout the evening.
This
was the second benefit party to be
given under the auspices of the lib­
rary board, the first one having been
held earlier in the season.
Prizes for high score at Wednes­
day's party was awarded to Mrs.
Ralph Richards and A. W. Purdy.
The ladies’ prize was donated by
Mrs. William Shaar of the Hermiston
Beauty Shoppe, and the prize for the
men by Morlun's.
Refreshments were served later in
the evening.
Mr. and Mrs. Roy Haddox were
Both the Methodist and Baptisi-
business visitors in Pendleton Satur­
Christian churches are having a
day.
lawn and parking put in around the
These im­
A group of young folks met at the buildings this spring.
Addleman home last Sunday for a provements will add much to the ap­
game of ball. Those present were pearance of the street and the
Ernest and Victor Addleman, Oscar churches.
Whitsett, Edwin Throop, “Skle” Les-
owski, Floyd Lynch. Claude Haddox,
Helstand Moore shipped two car­
Emmett Rogers, Walter Jendrzejew- loads of beef cattle to Portland last
ki, Dick Upham, “Snookie" and week from his Butter creek ranch.
R. Alexander of Pendleton, vice-
"Dutchie” Roberts and Tilford Stil­ Moore returned with a big smile on president of the First National bank
lings. Another game is scheduled for his face for the shipment topped the of Hermiston, was in town Wednes­
Sunday and It Is hoped that other market.
COUNCIL VOTES MONEY FOR
day looking over his "Iron men.”
young folks of the community will
LIBRARY LAW N IMPROVEMENT turn out. Bring your mits and tips!
The Old Grouch
At a meeting of the city council
last Wednesday evening the sum of
>160 was voted by that body for the
Improvement of the library lawn.
Much interest is being shown recent­
ly by various organizations In this
project, and it is the Intention of
those in charge to provide for the
care and maintenance of the grounds
after such improvements are made.
Mr. and Mrs. Lynch and family
and Mr. and Mrs. Luttrell were Sun­
day dinner gueeta at the Jasper Tem­
pleton home.
Tom Stewart purchased a brooder
house and brooder stove from M. I.
McRae last week.
THREE LINK CLUB TO GIVE
DANCE SATURDAY NIGHT
Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Clarke and
Plans for a ouslng good time hare
ramlly have moved into the W. T.
Solvester house west of town.
Mr. been made by the Three Link club of
Soivester was in Hermiston for the Hermiston for the annual 8t. Pat­
ricks day dance to be given in the
When serving grapefruit it is made past week from Blalock.
local auditorium Saturday, March 16.
•aster for the person eating it, if
Arrangements have been made for
the center core Is removed, ent u»I
8 P ix » a * a iK pan j q
around the edge of the Juicy mem­ Hermiston Sunday for Clatskanie * Peppy orchestra to provide the
brane and cut into individual sec­ where they expect to locate perma­ music for the dancers. The orchestra
is guaranteed to be good enough to
tions by severing the connective tis­ nently.
arouse a hearty appetite, and to meet
sue. A cherry placed in the center
lmproves the appearance.
Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Biggs and sons the emergency, the local Rebekaalis
were shopping in Pendleton Satur­ will be on hand with plenty of appe­
tising food.
day.
;
When boiling ham to be used cold,
Remember the night, Saturday,
letting It cool in the liquor in which
March 16, and be preared to make
it has cooked helps to make it juicy
E. M. Barnett of La Grande was a Whoopee with the Whoopee Serenad-
»n0 teadvr,
visitor ip Hermiston this week.
I
LEGISLATIVE CHAMBERS TO
‘‘Of course there have been diffi­
culties! And the one that loomed
the largest was when the state dairy
inspector objected to a laundry in
connection with the creamery. So
that was that, and the ladles must
needs look around for new quarters.
The American Legion had a building
next to the creamery which it was
willing to rent, so the auxiliary mov­
ed its tubs and other equipment fron
the creamery to enable them still tc
use steam from there. About this
time, too, they exanded their equip­
ment to include another electric
washer, again financed by a loan
from the Umatilla Project Farm Bur­
eau. The creamery cannot furnish
steam for more than two machines,
so that is their capacity in their pres­
ent location. It speaks well for the
foresight and organization ability of
the women who started this idea
that as many families can be served
so efficiently and give the women of
those families more leisure time.”
NEW BOOKS NOW IN COUNTY
LIBRARY AT PENDLETON
According to recent word received
from Miss Olsen, county librarian at
Pendleton, the following list of new
books have been purchased for the
library and are available to readers:
Sturgis books—Best stories of 1928.
Blanton— Child guidance. An ad­
mirable liandhook for parents, study
groups and all who are interested lb
the correct way of bringing up child
ren.
Cades—Any girl can be good look­
ing.
Comstock—Handbook of nature
study.
Manual for the study of in­
sects.
DIgby—Tigers, gold and witch
stories.
Duncan— My life.
4 7 workshop plays fine serless.
Garland-—Back raliers of the mid­
dle border.
Ilergeshelmer—Quiet cities.
Lauder— Roamin' in the gloamin'.
LieJ)— Eat, drink and be healthy.
Needham— Lifeof inland waters.
O. Henry memorial award prize stor­
ies of 1928.
Pickett—Soldier of the South.
P.osevelt— Rank and file; true
stories of .he great war.
Rose—The stump farm.
Gtrachey—Elizabeth and Essex.
Sullivan—Empire builder.
Zora—Sawdust and solitude.
Other new books:
Bowman—The new world; prob
len'8 ,n Political geography.
Finger— Frontier ballads.
Hoffenstein-—Poems in praise oi
practically nothing.
Tolstoi— Private diary of Leo Tol
stoy 1853-1857.
Fiction:
Freeman—Joseph and his brethren.
Heyward— Mamba's daughter.
Porter—Just mother and other
stories.
Sears—Zatthy; a tale of ancient
Galilee.
Thomson—Time is a gentleman.
Children's books:
Burrows- Irene of Tundra Tow
ers.
Conner—On Sweetwater trail.
Davis— Dr. Pete of the Sierras.
Field—Polly Patchwork.
Grlshian— Peter Pea.
Grishina—Sparrow house.
Heward— Amelfaranne keeps shop.
Janies— Alphabet of aviation.
Karrlck—Still more Russinn pic­
ture tales.
Lindsay—Thp choosing hook.
Rogers— Drake’s guest.
Seymour— Boy’s life of Fremont.
Smith—Little folks from etiquette
town.
Verdery— About Ellie at Sand AcAi.
West— Lone scout of the sky.
HERMISTON JOINe<
COUNTY BASEBALL
LEAGUE RECENTLY
ORGANIZATION
MEETING
HELD
IN PENDLETON MONDAY
Adams, M ission Indians, Pendleton
Eagles and Locals Compose
League.
Hormiston will be one of four teams
making up the Umatilla County Base
ball League, according to the results
of a meeting held in Pendleton Mon-
Jay evening and uttended by Henry
Hitt and Leo llurly, local baseball
fans. Besides the locals, the league
will be compos.ed of Adams, Mission
Indians and the Pendleton Eagles.
Organization of the league came
about at the meeting the first of the
week. Jack Allen of Pendleton was
sleeted to serve as president; Vayne
Turdane, also of Pendleton, was chos­
en secretary-treasurer, and Ursel
liatt was named as director for this
llstrict. By-laws for the organiza­
tion were also drafted at this meet­
ing.
Sunday, March 31. has been set as
the opening day of the league, with
Hermiston nnd Pendleton having the
first games. Who their opponents
will be lias not been decided as yet,
or no schedules have been made out.
Thise will probably be completed
within a short time, however, and
will be ready for publication.
A manager for the local team will
'»e elected at a meeting this Thurs-
lay night, and within a few days
iractice will probably be started.
C ocal chairman appointed
FOR PHILIPPINE DAY, MAY 1
F. B. Swayze, prsident of the First
National bank, has been appointed
ocal chairman for Philippine day, ac-
•ording to a notice recently received.
May 1, the anniversary of the Bat­
tle of Manila, has been designated as
Philippine Day by the trustees of the
Leonard Wood memorial for the erad-
.cation of leprosy. On May 1, 1927,
Major General Wood appealed to the
American nation for a fund of >2,-
100,000 to eradicate leprosy in the
’hilippines, where the largest colony
if these pitiful human beings found
mywhere, are living under the Stars
ind Stripes. The responsse was in­
stantaneous, over >1,000,000 having
jecn contributed.
A prominent citizen in every town
ind city in the United States has been
isked to appoint a committee of
ocal business men who will become
•esponsible for the raising of a cer-
aln sum of money in each locality
o help rid the world of leprosy. The
ruslees of the Leonard Wood Momor-
al are as follows: General James
1. Ilarhoard. chairman, General Sam-
jel McRoberts, Robert L. Bacon,
Uversly Childs, Robert W. DoForrest.
Dr. John H. Finley, Charles E.
iughes, Arthur W. Page, Kermit
Roosevelt, Col. Henry L. Stinson and
Jwen D. Young.
Dairymen Ready For Meet
Plans are practically completed for
‘he big statewide dairy conference at
Corvallis March 21 and 22, when
dairymen from every county in the
tate will meet with representatives
<f every dlv’r.'on of the industry to
nap out pirns for steady and orderly
evelopment of Pr.i on Into a greater
'airy state. Committees appointed In
idvance have been busy gathering
icw In 'ormat'on, especially as re­
gards marketing possibilities, nnd
will have It ready for presentation at
he conference.
R E C riV E CHINESE ALMANAC
UNION SERVICES HELD
A large crowd attended the spec­
ial union services at the Baptist
Christian church last Sunday morn
Ing where boy scouts and their par­
ents were guests The sermon was
delivered by Rev. O. W. Payne of the
Methodist church, who Is assietant
scout master of the local troop. Spec­
ial inusie featured the service«.
Paul Miller is in the Hermiston
hospital this week receiving medical
I realtn»nt.
A Chinese Christian Almanac has
recently been received by the Herald
from the Rev. H. G. C. Hallock, mis­
sionary to China. The book Is printed
in Chinese style, beginning at the
Jack and going forward with the let­
tering also in Chinese extending up
and <V)wn 4*>e pages. The paper
which it is printed on la very thin, an
imitation Chinese paper, and the book
is bound by hand and on the edges
instead of at the folds of the paper.
Anyone Interested In looking at
the copy may stop In at the Herald
office.