The Hermiston herald. (Hermiston, Or.) 19??-1984, September 27, 1928, Image 4

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    THE HEBMISTOH HERALD, 1TEBMIBTO3F. OMDQOlf.
PREMIUM LIST OF UMATILLA PROJECT
FAIR ASSOCIATION
(Continued From Page One)
DIVISION C— SHEEP
Wm. Logan, Superintendent
Judging on basis of breeding stock for mutton
type sheep.
1 Ram,
any age
33 2
2 Ewe, over one year
S 2
2
Ewe, under 1 year
3 2
4 Pen of four lambs either sex, get of
1 ram bred and owned by exhibitor
5 3
5 Flock (1 ram oyer 1 year, ewe over
1 year and ewe lamb
5 3
• Ram lamb
3 2
Second Farm Display, Special by Collins Flour
Mills, 1 sack flour.
Rules— Premiums offered for most complete and
artistic exhibits of products grown on one farm.
Decorations must be made only with products ex­
hibited. Exhibits must score 50 points to qualify,
and the following score will be used by judge« In
making awards:
Quality ......................................... 25 points
Forage crops, alfalfa, corn, grass 15 points
Stock root crops and squash....... 10 points
Grains .................................i......... 6 roints
Potatoes ......................................... 5 points
Vegetables, fresh, canned dried.. 6 points
Fruit, fresh, canned, d rie d .................. 6 points
Miscellaneous ............................... 10 points
Arrangement ................................. 10 points
A total of 100 points
Class—
1st 2d 3d
2 Potatoes, Rural type, 45 pound ex­
hibit
33
32 31
3 Potatoes, Netted Gems, 45 pound ex­
hibit
3 2 1
4 Corn, 15 ears
3 2 1
5 'Corn, 12 stalks
3 2 1
6 Squash, two
2 1
7 Onions
2 1
DIVISION D—POULTRY
F. M. Outwits, Superintendent
No birds under four and one-half months will
be ellgtble for competition.
Pens will consist of four female« and one male.
All eggs exhibited and eggs laid during exhibi­
tion days will become property of the management.
▲wards will be made on basis of utility as well
as show points.
Class—
1st 2d
3d
White Leghorns
33 32 Ribbon
1 Pen, 4 hens, 1 cock
8 2 Ribbon
2 Pen, 4 pullets, 1 cockerel
DIVISION E—WOMENS’ DIVISION
S 1 Ribbon
3 4 hens
Mrs. C. M. Best, Superintendent
2 1 Ribbon
4 4 pullets
All exhibits in this division must be the work of
3 , 1 Ribbon ¿ho exhibitor.. Entry may be made by any resi­
6 Hen
2 1 Ribbon dent of Umatilla county. Irrigon and Boardman.
« Pullet
9 1 Ribbon
7 Cock
All exhibits must be entered by 1 P. M., Friday
1 1 Ribbon October 5. Exhibits In Department A, Class I,
3 Cockerel
Cooking, will be judged at 2 P. M. Friday, October
5. All other exhibits in this division will be Judg
Barred Rocks
e j at 10 o'clock Saturday morning, October 6.
-a a Ribbon
9 Pen 4 hens, 1 cock
DEPARTMENT A—HOME ECONOMY
19 Pen 4 pullets or hens
a a Ribbon Class—
1st 2d
2 i Ribbon 1 Loaf of white bread
11 Hen
52.00 81 00
12 Pullet
a i Ribbon 2 Loaf cake
2.00 1.00
2 l Ribbon 3 Angel cake
13 Cock
2.00 1.00
2 i Ribbon 4 Layer cake, entry open only to girls
14 Cockerel
13 Rhode Island Red— 4 hens, 1 cock 2 l Ribbon
under 18 years
2.00 1.00
5 Rolled cookies
2.00 1.00
DIVISION D—POULTRY—Continued
6 “ Apple pie
2.00 1.00
Turkeys
7 Canned fruit, 3 Jars, 3 varieties
3.00 1.50
let 2d 3d
8 Canned vegetables, 3 Jars, 3 var-
3 2 Ribbon
lties
3.00 1.50
1« 2 hens, 1 cock
Ribbon 9 Pickles, 3 Jars or bottles, 3 var­
17 Hen
2
Ribbon
ieties
2.00 1.00
18 Pullet
2
Ribbon 10 Jelly, 3 glasses, 3 varieties
2
2.00 1.00
19 Cock
Ribbon 11 Preserves, 3 Jars, 3 varieties
20 Cockerel
2
2.00 1.00
Ribbon 12 Display home canned products of
2
21 Ducks— 1 drake, 2 ducks
Ribbon
2
fruits, meats, vegetables, Jelly etc. 3.00 2.00
22 Geese— 1 gander, 2 geese
Ribbon 13 Best single Jar of fruit, entered In
2
23 White eggB, 1 dozen
Ribbon
24 Brown eggs. 1 dozen
2
diplays 7 or 12
1.00
Best pen White Leghorns, 10 gal. Red Crown 14 Best single jar of vegetables
entered In display S or 12
1.00
gas, given by Black and White Oarage.
Set 6 decorated China teacups and saucers for
best apple pie. Given by Morlan’s Variety store.
DIVISION P—HONEY
DEPARTMENT B—DOMESTIC ART
J. D. Harrah, Superintendent
Needlework
Class—
1st 2d 3d Class—
1st 2d
1 Specimen comb honey, not less
1 Ladies wash dress
32.00 31-00
93 2 1 2 Display of Infanta garemnts, 3 or more
than 24 pounds
Specimen extracted honey, not
articles
•
2.00 1.00
3 1
less than 24 pounds
3 Embroidered hand made baby dress 2.00 1.00
Specimen beeswax, not less than
4 Display practical home made gar­
10 pounds, soft, bright yellow wax
ments, 6 or more articles
3.00 1.60
to be given preference
5 Hooked rug
2.00 1.00
Single comb nedeus 3 handed Ital­
8 Display of crochst, 3 or more a rti­
ian bees
cles
2.00 1.00
Single comb necleus golden Italian
7 French embroidered luncheon set,
5 pieces
2.00 1.00
• Single comb necleus Carnlolan bees
8 Display French embroidery, 3 or more
7 Largest and most attractive display
pieces
2.00 1.00
8 5 3
of apiarian products
9 Pillow cases, crochet, 1 to 3 pairs 2.00 1.00
10 Display colored embroidery, 3 or
DIVISION P—HONEY—Continued
2.00 1.00
more articles
Best Display Apiary Products, special by Clover
11 Luncheon set,, colored embroidery,
Leaf Market, Pendleton, 55.00.
5 pieces
2.00 1.00
Second Apiary Display Special, by Collins Flour 12 Vanity set, 3 pieces
2.00 1.00
Mills, 1 sack flour.
13 Embroidered towel. 1 to 3
2.00 1.00
Ten dollars gtven by Umatilla County Beekeep­ 14 Best pair darned hose, ladles or
gents
2.00 1.00
ers' Association for best display of cooking with
Girls Under 18
honey.
15 Best dress, wash
2.00 1.00
Best display honey, 10 gal. Red Crown gas. by 16 Display of sewing, 3 or more pieces 2.00 1.00
Black and White Oarage.
Pair Indies' 31-50 silk bloomers for best embroid­
ered lunch set of at least 5 pieces. This year's work.
RABBITS
Given by Morlan'a Variety store.
J. 8. West, Superintendent
Fair 3100 silk hose for neatest darning done by
1st 2d 3d
girl 12 to 14. Given by Morlan’s Variety store.
Buck
3 3 1 Ribbon
Doe
2 1 Ribbon PREMIUM LIST FOR BOYS’ AND GIRLS’ CLUBS
Doe and Young
2 1 Ribbon SEWING—
Above awards In each of following breeds, Amer­
Division 1 Is. 82.00; 2d. 8150; 3d. 5100
ican, Blue, Chinchilla, New Zealand Red.
Division 2 1st. 32 00; 2d. 31.50; 3d. 31-00.
Division 3 1st, 32.00; 2d, 31.50; 3d. 3100.
Special In Farm Products— 10 gals, gas to winner
Handwork. 1st. 32.00; 2d. 31.50; 3d, 51.00.
of first; 6 gals, to second, given by Black and
Bachelor: 1st, 32.00; 2d, 31.50; 3d, 31.00.
White Oarage.
RABBIT8—
1st, 32.50; 2d, 32.00; 3d, 31.50; 4th, 31-00;
5th, 31-00.
CORN—
1st, 33.00; 2d, 32.00; 3d, 31-00; 4th, 3100;
5th, 51-00.
CALF—
Jersey Division 1: 1st, 35.00; 2nd, 34.00; 3rd,
33.00; 4th. 32.00; 5th, 31.00; 6th, 3100; 7thh,
31-00.
Holstein, Division 1: 1st, 54.00; 2d, 53.00; 3d,
32.00; 4th, 31-00.
Division 2: 1st, 34.00; 2d, >3.00; 3d, 32.00; 4th,
31.00
Beef, Division 4: 1st, 32.00.
3HEEP—
Division 1: 1st, 34.00; 2d, 8 3 .0 0 ; 3d, 32.00; 4th,
31.00; 5th. 31 00; 6th, 31.00.
Division 2: 1st, 34.00; 2d, 33.00; 3d, 32.00; -1th,
31.00; 5th, 31.00; 6th, 31 00.
Division 3: 1st, 33.00; 2d, 32-00.
PIGS—
Division 1: 1st, 55.00; 2d, 34.00; 3d, 53.00.
Division 2 and 3: 1st, 54.00; 2d, 33.50; 3d,
33.00; 4th, 32.50; 5th, 52.00; 6th, 31-50; 7th,
31-00.
Special Club Awards
Dr. H. 8. McKenzie, Pendleton, $6.00, to be divl-
led among winners In girls’ clubs.
Tallman Drug Co., Pendleton, 56.00 billfold to
autstanding Jersey calf club member.
Gadwa Harness Shop, Pendleton, 85.00 to out­
standing Holstein calf club member.
Mark J. Barthel, Pendleton, 35.00.for best fitted
calf.
H yatt & Brown, Pendleton, all-wool Bradley
sweater, for best lamb.
Thompson Drug Store, Pendleton, 36.00 fountain
Pen, to outstandlg ping pig club member.
Thos. Campbell, Hermiston, 35.00 for outstand­
ing sheep club member, and 35.00 for best show­
man.
Royal Splendor That
Once Dazzled Europe
Utilized as Weapons
First Door Knocksrs
The decorative quality of door
knockers has been gaining in recogni­
tion and is now held in poular favor,
says a writer in l'our Home Maga-
sfne.
"Door knockers," reads Your Home,
“were little known in the obscure
reaches of ancient history, and their
development from articles of mere
utility to objects of art lias covered
centuries. The Greeks considered It
a breach of etiquette to enter a house
without warning the Inmates. Spar­
tans gave this notice h.v shouting their
arrival, but the Athenians announced
themselves by using tlie knocker,
which Introduction was doubtless
made at the time when doors suiier-
seded hangings for purposes of great­
er privacy or safety. First it • con
stated of a rod like piece of iron
chained to the door, but unfriendly
visitors sometimes wrenched It from
the door and used It as a weapon of
offense against the Inmates. It was
then that the form was changed to
that of a heavy ring fastened bv a
strong clamp or plate to ttie door, thus
serving the double purpose of knock­
er and handle. From Greece the cus­
tom was transmitted to the Homans
and through their conquests to nearly
every country of Europe. It was not
long before they were very much elab
orated, beveled, chased and designed
in many variations, of which repro­
ductions may be found for the door
that would be Interesting today.”
Guinea Fowl Resists
Appeal of the Wild
Europe was dazzled by a display of
royal pomp unequaled ln the history
of pageantry, when Henry VIII met
Francis 1 of France on the Field of
tbe Cloth of Gold.
For his entertainment a temporary
palace was built at Guinea, near Cal­
ais, covering three acres. No fewer
than 2,800 tents stood around it to
house the knights and ladies of his re­
splendent train. Their cliupel liad 35
priests to serve It and for tlie 20-odd
days they were in France 2,200 sheep
went to form one item of their menu.
There is a picture in Hampton court
which will give you some idea of the
splendor of the day. it shows tlie
Great Harry, that giant ship, with her
sails of damasked cloth of gold and
four royal standards flying from her
fo’c'sle, sailing out of Dover harbor.
Other ships, hearing Yeomen of the
Guard, drummers, lifers and banner
bearers, are making ready to follow,
and tlie water is thronged with small
boats full of spectators, one of whom
is graphically represented in the act
o f being seasick.
TI ip diplomatic results of (Ids mag­
nificent display of wealth anti power,
it i? sad to read, were as near uotlilng
as doesn’t matter.
Chairman Didn’t Quite
Get Idea of Lecture
Being a Scot, and ttierefore a sen­
timentalist, 1 have always had an ap­
preciative eye for good-looking women.
As u consequence of inuny wander­
ings I thought 1 could give u lecture
about the ladies of many lauds. I
gathered a lot of pretty photographs—
ladles walking in Hyde park, dusky
maidens dancing In the South Sea is­
lands, und that kind of thing—and
wove a cheery lecture. “Sovereign
Woman: Being the Impression of a
Man in Thirty-eight Countries." It
went well.
1 delivered It in a Surrey residen­
tial town. My chairman, who had en­
tertained me ardently at dinner, said
the customary tilings a chairman Is
expected to say—information culled
from “Who’s Who’’—ami concluded
by remarking, “Now I will call upon
our lecturer to give you bis experi­
ences witli 38 women in different
countries!” The audience roared. I
blushed. The chairman inquired in a
loud whisper, “Have 1 said anything
wrong?”—Sir John Foster Fraser in
London Graphic.
Guinea fowls have been domesticated
ail over the United States, comments a
scientist of the United States Depart­
ment of Agriculture, and have bad
plenty of opportunities to escape to
the wild. They have shov.n little
indication of desiring to do so. and
this seems rather surprising, in view
of the fact that they have done so
In some of the islands of the West In­
dies. They were certainly introduced
long ago into most of these islands
and are now found in a wild state In
Jamaica, Cuba, Porto Rico, Domini­
can Republic, and a few of the Lesser
Antilles. Where the mongoose Is pres­
ent it preys extensively on guinea fowl
First Natonal Bank, Hermiston, contributed 320 and keeps their numbers much in
for work on Fair grounds.
check. On Barbuda, in the Lesser An­
tilles, which was made into a sort
of game preserve more than 200 years
DAIRY ENTERPRISE SPECIAL
ago, the birds still flourish. Wild gui­
Prize offered by Herlmston Commercial Club and nea fowl have been directly intro­
Umatilla Project Farm Bureau, to be divldej as duced Into the southeastern states in
recent years, but the outcome of these
Disappointing
follows: 1st, 325.00; 2d, 315.00; 3d, 310.00.
experiments is not yet known.
The big house in ttie wood had
Rules of Entry—
\ _____ ____________
been unteuanted for years and was
Six or more herds must enter before this will be
supposed to be haunted.
a contest.
“Fifty-Four Forty” •
In despair tlie owner had the place
Herds entering must consist of six or more cows.
The phrase “Fifty-four forty or redecorated, fitted witli electric light
At least three animals from the herd, Including fight” Is hplieved to have originated and every possible labor-saving de­
young stock, must be exhibited at the Umatilla with William Allen, who was United vice, and offered the whole concern
Proect Fair, which will be held October 5 and 6, States senator from Ohio in 1844. at at a very modest rental.
the time of the controversy with
Later he happened to hear that a
1928.
Great Britain over the Oregon boun­
Judging will be done by an outside, disinterest­ dary. This slogan, which helped to man had been shown over the house,
and in great excitement he rang up
ed party, before the fair is held.
elect Polk to the Presidency, meant the agent.
that Great Britain must recognize as
SCORE CARD
"19 it true some one’s taken that
American soil the whole Pacific coast
45 per cent from the northern boundary of Cali­ house at Inst?” he a3ked.
A. Herd.
The agent's voice was sad.
35 per cent
1. Quality
fornia to the aouthern limits of Rus­
"So far he’s only taken the electric
10 per cent
sian Alaska, the line of latitude 54
2, Condition
fittings,” he replied. “Per'apa
B. Management
40 per cent degrees 40 min. north, or else the light
United States would declare war. The he’ll come back for the rest.”
1, Feeding system: balanced rat-
matter was settled by treaty In 1840.
tlon, succulence, concentrate«
without war, by making the forty-
25 per cent
and roughage
Net Case of Attraction -
ninth parallel the boundary line west
2. Records kept
7 per cent
When two small objects are float­
to the Island of Vancouver, which was
7V4 per cent
a. Labor, convenience
ing near each other In a basin of wa­
given to Canada.
Barns, Milk House, Milking Machine and
ter why are they suddenly drawn to­
gether ns if by a magnet? The bu­
Other Equipment
15 per cent
reau of standards says that the
1. Sanitation!, ventilation, loca­
His Occupation
weight of the floating particles
tion and llgrHt
10 per cent
•T hear your son has taken up a stretches
surface of the water,
2. Supplemental equipment: Sepa­
profession, Mr. O'Casey,” remarked forming a the
dimple when the two par­
rators, milking machines, cool­
the visitor.
ticles come close enough; the two
“He has, Indade,” rejoined the host. dimples coalesce into one, throwing
ing equipment, pails, etc. 5 per cent
“He’s phwat they call a ‘cross-exnm- the particles together. The action is
100 p. c 100 p. c. lner.’ ”
due to surface tension, in virtue of
This was too much for the stranger. which the surfnee Is constantly striv­
“And phwat’s a ‘cross-examiner?’ ’’ ing to reduce Its exposed area to a
he asked.
_____
SCORE CARD
minimum.—Washington Star.
For a minute or two O’Cnsey was
Prize offered by the Hermiston Commercial Club at a loss, but eventually he pulled
and the Umatilla Project Farm Bureau, to be of­ himself together.
Problem
(
fered aa follows: 1st, 825.00; 2d, 815.00; and 3d,
“Sure, It’s a fellow who asks you
Last year 1 asked my best girl to
310.00. Prizes to be offered for the poultry plant questions, an' you answer the ques­ marry me and she refused. I got even
that Is ln the best condition to go into winter at tions, an' then he questions the an­ with her by marrying her mother.
swers,” he returned easily.—Montreal Then my father married the girl. Now
the time of the Umatilla Project Fair.
what nm 1 to myself?
Perfect Family Herald.
When I married the girl’s mother
Score
the girl became my daughter and when
A. Condition of flock
40 p. c.
Bird’s “Language”
my father married nty daughter she
1. Maturity, uniformity
20 p. c.
A scientist who has been making a became my mother. Who am I?
2. Condtion of birds, flesh, health,
study of tbe songs and noises made by
My mother’s mother, who Is my;
activity
15 p. e. birds, says that the African finch
wife,
be my grandmother. Since
3. Freeness from vermin
5 p. c. seems to have a vocabulary of about I am must
my grandmother’s husband, I
B. Housing and equipment
35 p. e. 300 words, and apparently an alphabet am, therefore, my own grandfather.—
1. Sanitation
10 p. c. of 24 letters or symbols. Instead of Vancouver Province.
singing when It opens Its beak. It
2. Location, ventilation, condition of
really makes a little speech of many
litter (overcrow'd! ng, drafts and
words. Often the bird will use a word
E. L. Jackson, Supt. of Boys’ Club.
Where the Shed Horns Go
dampness)
20 p. e. one day and not use It again for
DIVISION 0 —PARK PRODUCTS
POULTRY—
3. Supplemental equipment
6 p. c. many weeks.
Why aren't the woods full of the
Baxter Hutchison, Superintendent
Chickens: 1st. 33 00; 2d. 32.50; 3d. 32 00; 4th, C. Management
25 p. c. It wakes up at the same time every horns which deer and moose shed
Best One Farm Display;
812.00
88.00
34.00
31.60; 6th, 3100; 6th, 31.00.
1. Feeding system, time of feeding, etc. 15 p. c. morning, and usually makes the same every winter? The answer, according
Best Farm Display, Special by Pendleton Cash
Turkeys: 1st. 83.00; 2d. 32.00.
2. Records kept (accurate but simple)
5 p. c. morning speech of about 20 words to a writer In Field and Stream, Is
that they are eaten by rodents.
Market. 35.00.
Ducks: 1st. 53.00; 2d. $2.00; 3d. 3100.
3. I-abor and convenience of operator
5 p. c. that lasts 14 seconds. Its dally sched­ “Many,"
says the sport monthly, “have
ule varies less from day to day than been found partly eaten which have
that of human beings.
the teeth marks of mice, chipmunks,
squirrels, ground squirrels and porcu­
pines. Horns disappear quickly after
Juvenile Curiosity
they are shed, as few are found in the
Little Maragret had been presented woods,”
with a splendid toy with which she
was never tired of playing; In fact,
■he played with It all day long.
Versatile Publishers
“Margaret,” remarked her mother,
The Centroizdat. central publishing
“how is It that you never play with house of the Soviet republics, faces
any of yonr other toys?”
a big task In supplying books to tlie
“Oh, let her play with It,” protested various small nations of Russia In
the child’s father. “As soon as the their respective tongues. Most of the
novelty wears off shell stop.”
books are textbooks, printed to sup
A few minutes later mother noticed ply the demand of the newly liberated,
her little daughter examining the toy backward peoples fur education and
very cloaely, and asked what she was knowledge. Six fundamental alpha-
doing.
bets are used to print Hie 42 dlah-cts:
“Looking for the novelty that wears Russian. Latin. Hebrew. Arabic. Gntli-'
off,” the little one replied.—Pearson’a Ic and East Cot hie.
UMATILLA PROJECT FAIR-FRIDAY AND SATURDAY, OCTOBER 5 AND 6