Heppner gazette-times. (Heppner, Or.) 1925-current, October 30, 1996, Page SEVEN, Image 7

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    Heppner Gazette-Times, Heppner, Oreflon Wednesday, October 30, 1996
Candidates Forum
an intelligent choice for the best
interests of all.
What is your position on
• maintaining Pioneer Memorial
Hospital in Heppner? Is there
: a future for the hospital?
Because of the geographical
location, there is no question
that a hospital is needed in
Heppner.
What is your position concer­
ning the current plans to build
a medical clinic in Irrigon?
The medical board has al­
ready made the decision to do
this. My personal opinion has
been that we needed more
trained EMTs and emergency
transportation available and
that we needed to provide
some sort of senior transporta­
tion so that Ihey could continue
to see the same doctors they've
seen for years. However, the
decision has been made and I
will support it and give it every
chance to work.
What would you like to see
changed in road maintenance
or the road department?
I hate to see change just for
change's sake. I think we all
feel that the roads everywhere
should be better than they are.
That is human nature. How­
ever, the question becomes one
of paying for what we want
versus what we can afford.
There are just too many factors
involved to have a simple
answer to this question. Where
there are problems, we must
look at them and solve each
one individually.
How would you encourage
the separate county depart­
ments to be more accountable
to the public?
I think the departments as a
whole are trying to be accoun­
table. In a case where one de­
partment isn't, we can influ­
ence some positive changes
with strong leadership on our
part and through some budget
decisions if necessary.
Do you feel north Morrow
County is well served in the
arw* of county services? If not,
how can this be rectified?
I don't like this type of north-
south question. It only adds
fuel to a situation that doesn't
need to be. For starters, Mea­
sure 5 put a limit on revenues
and the money just isn't going
to be there to meet the "wants"
of everyone in the county. The
commissioners will have to
work hard and study each
situation to be as fair as possi­
ble in meeting everyone's
needs and not just the needs of
a special group, individual or
squeaky wheel, and that
doesn't matter where in the
county it is.
How can you assist in heal­
ing the anger and resentment
that exist between north and
south county residents?
I think that there is some
anger between some factions in
the county, but I also think that
most residents of Morrow
County can, do, and will con­
tinue to work together for a bet­
ter county. Representation
from a wider geographical area
in the county will come about
as a result of this election and
this should help broaden the
informational base from which
the commissioners make their
decisions. This broader base of
information for decisions is im­
portant for a healthy county.
Should county com m is­
sioners be elected from
districts or at-large? Why?
This is a question with no
easy answer. I feel that it is best
for a county-wide election so
that the commissioners are
responsible to the county as a
whole. However, with popula­
tion growth, there is a danger
that some areas of the county
may end up with no local
representation. That isn't good
either because we need a broad
base of information in order to
make sound decisions. I don't
have the magic ball to give me
the solution to this problem at
this time.
What are the other major
issues facing you as a county
commissioner?
I see two major issues right
now. One issue is the discus­
sion over building our own
county jail or continuing to
try to rent space from other
jails. Renting hasn't worked
well in the past because, accor­
ding to our sheriff's depart­
ment, 75 percent of the time
those that should be jailed are
turned loose because there is
no bed space for us to rent. It
isn't going to be free, but I feel
that it is the obligation of the
commissioners to do as much
as possible to protect the good
citizens of our county.
A second issue is that some
the the measures coming up for
a vote in our general election
could cause some serious fun­
ding and local control problems
for our cities and the county
and we will need someone with
the time and energy to deal
with these issues and Salem. I
would be committed to helping
our whole county in this effort.
Why should the voters
elect you over your opponents?
There are several reasons
why I, John Wenholz, should
be elected. First, I am not
obligated to any person or
group. I will make my decisions
based on the best information
I can get and on what I feel is
best for the needs of the coun­
ty as a whole. Another main
reason is that I have resided in,
owned a business in, and have
worked in and for Morrow
County for the last 23 years. As
a long-time, permanent resi­
dent, I have a real vested in­
terest in us having a positive,
successful county government
for now and the future. I will
spend w hatever time and
energy it takes to ensure that
we have one.
BUI "Whisker BUI" Marren,
42, Boardman, has lived in the
•county since 1981.
Marren, who is single and
has one grown child, is the
former owner of "W hisker
B ill's" restaurant and bar. He
is now employed with the
TACX hay cubing operation.
M arren graduated from
Caldwell Senior High School at
Caldwell, Idaho. He has been
involved with O peration
Graduation, which is a golf
tournament which raises funds
for the Riverside High School's
drug and alcohol-free gradua­
tion party. He has also work­
ed with Boardman Police Chief
Greg Sayles on a community
watch program for Boardman.
What do you feel is your role
as Morrow County Commis­
sioner?
I'm not going to pretend that
1 know everything about Mor­
row County. Basically, I want
to make decisions to decide
what is best for Morrow
County.
As a board member, do you
feel you represent the county
as a whole or the area from
which you were elected?
Definitely as the whole coun­
ty. The county has to operate
as an entire unit, rather than as
bits and pieces of a whole
How can you help accom­
modate the growth and in­
dustry, and accompanying pro­
blems, in the north end of the
county, while maintaining
quality of life in an insecure
economic situation in the south
end of the county?
By promoting business in the
north end of the county and
promoting industry in the
south county. The more in­
dustry we bring into the coun­
ty as a whole will increase the
tax base, which will help the
county operate.
What do you feel is the com­
missioner's role in the ongoing
problems concerning the Mor­
row County Health District?
Should the health district re­
main as a county-wide entity or
should the district be divided?
I don't think all the channels
have been exhausted to find a
means to come up with a solu­
tion that will satisfy the needs
of all concerned. I believe in
Morrow County and want to
work with the other commis­
sioners to find ways to main­
tain the quality of life here and
explore all possibilities.
What is your position on
maintaining Pioneer Memorial
Hospital in Heppner? Is there
a future for the hospital?
There's got to be a future for
the hospital. That end of the
county needs major medical
care.
What is your position concer­
ning the current plans to build
a medical clinic in Irrigon?
From talking to a lot of peo­
ple in Irrigon, they don't seem
to feel a need for it. I guess I'll
have to go along with the
citizens of Irrigon.
What would you like to see
changed in road maintenance
or the road department?
We need more road mainten­
ance service to the north end of
the county.
How would you encourage
the separate county depart­
ments to be more accountable
SEVEN
Candidates Forum
to the public?
Consolidate some of these
different entities into one office
area, if possible, and get them
together so they have to work
together. As far as accountabili­
ty to the public, the elected or
appointed officials have to
make themselves accessible,
and people have to get involv­
ed in voting their opinions.
Do you feel north Morrow
County is well served in the
area of county services? If not,
how can this be rectified?
With many county services
we're very well covered in the
north end of the county, but in
many we're not. This can be
rectified by letting the entire
county know the problems that
each community has, by open­
ing up lines of communication
so that everyone is aware of
what's going on everywhere.
The past is the past. Looking
toward the future of Morrow
County, rather than dwelling
on the past, we can open those
lines and get on with keeping
Morrow County a wonderful
place to live.
Should county com m is­
sioners be elected from dis­
tricts or at-large? Why?
I believe at large. It would
make it easier to represent the
entire county rather than in­
dividual areas.
What are the other major
issues facing you as a county
It's trick-or-treat time
commissioner?
Issues are out there today,
most likely won't be there come
January when I take office if
elected.
It's a matter of getting
everyone together, making
them look at the county as a
whole, rather than looking at it
as an individual person or
communities.
Why should the voters
elect you over your opponents?
I have a willingness to listen
to what people want and fin­
ding innovative ways to make
things work. 1 care about Mor­
row County. I choose to live
here. 1 could have lived any­
where I wanted to. I hope Mor­
row County chooses me.
Births
Carson Matthew Morter-a
son Carson Matthew was born
to Roger and Carla Morter,
Heppner, on Wednesday, Oc­
tober 16, 1996, at Kadlec Medi­
cal Center in Richland, Wash­
ington. The baby weighed 6
lbs. 4 oz. and measured I 8 V 2 "
long.
He joins brothers and sisters,
Julie, 10, Brian, 9, Chelsie, 6 ,
Kailey, 4 and Preston, 2.
Grandparents are Dexter and
Corinne Miles, Heppner, and
Perry and Kathy Morter, lone.
Great-grandmother is Ethel
Dunbar, Lexington, and great­
grandfather is Melvin Siggel-
kow, Scobey, Montana.
Judie Laughlin presents Heppner Elementary School children with trick-or-treat bags on behalf of Sorop-
timist International of Heppner. The students are members of Karen Clough's kindergarten class.
Hans Isaeh Jordan Rockwell-
a son Hans Isaeh Jordan was
born to Natasha and Richard
Rockwell of Boardman on Oc­
tober 7, 19% at Good Shepherd
Community Hospital in Her-
miston. The baby weighed 7
lbs. 5 oz.
lone Youth Group help homeless
Senior Luke Swanson who made his first service trip as a seventh
grader, helps Lorie Sullivan hand out spoons at the door
Eric Walters and Suzie Heideman sweep the floor after serving the
meal at Blanchet House
ed. The line waiting to get in for
Seventeen lone Youth Group the free meal is usually several
members and six adult leaders blocks long. The crew at Blan­
traveled to Portland recently for chet serves breakfast and lunch
to the needy 365 days a year.
a Burnside service trip.
The day started early at Blan­ All of the food served comes
chet House, where the group from store donations or is paid
made preparations to serve for by private donations. Blan­
lunch. Because so many people chet does not depend on state
are fed each day, everyone has or federal funds.
"W e served a good meal of
a specific task to do. The jobs
included helping in the kit­ stew, tossed salad, bread and
chen, handing out spoons at ice cre a m ," Youth Group
the door, keeping the coffee leader Jeri McElligott noted.
and water pitchers filled, serv­ "T h e people can eat as much
ing the salad and stew, han­ as they want and a few even
ding out bread and dessert and brought containers so they
cleaning up and resetting the could take food with them. 1
was really proud of our kids.
tables.
Feeding so many people so fast
"W e had a counter to keep
track of how many bowls of isn't easy. They really had to
stay focused and do their jobs
stew we filled in the kitchen
well
to keep up. Everyone was
and we counted 587," Youth
really
tired by the time we
Group members Marc Orem
finished."
and Jake McElligott reported.
The lone group stayed and
Don Liebendorfer, Blanchet
ate lunch with the crew, and
House manager, said there
then walked to O utreach
aren't many places for the
Ministry. Sister Maria Frances,
homeless to eat on Saturdays
director of Outreach, showed a
because most agencies are clos-
Mark McElligott and Kelly Morgan clean tables at Blanchet House
video of the ministry work they ing the trip were Luke Swan­
do and then talked to the group son, Kelly Morgan, Steve
about her commitment to help Allen, Suzy Heideman, Eric
the poor. She asked the stu­ Walters, Patrick Eberhard, Jake
dents to help the poor when McElligott, Jenny Sullivan,
they become adults. "You may Marc Orem, Niki Sullivan, Tori
be able to come down here and Odinet, Nikki McElligott, Am­
help out, or you may only be ber Miles, Mark McElligott,
albe to send money. Perhaps all Miranda McElligott, Adrienne
you will be able to do is to of­ Swanson and Korey Morgan.
fer a poor person a smile or a Adult leaders participating
kind word. You must do what were Virgil and Debbie Mor­
gan, Jim and Monica Swanson,
you can d o ," she said.
Youth Group members mak- Lorie Sullivan and Jeri McElli­
gott.