Heppner gazette-times. (Heppner, Or.) 1925-current, February 26, 1981, Supplement, Page SIX, Image 18

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    SIX The Gaiette-Times. Heppner, Oregon, Thursday. February 26, 1981
Chemical Tillage
By HAROLD KERR
Chemical tillage is attract
ing considerable attention
from dryland wheat growers
in the Columbia Basin.
The program allows for a
reduction in the amount of
tillage which occurs by replac
ing two or more operations
with an application of a
chemical to reduce weeds and
volunteer wheat growth in the
stubble.
The advantages of the
practice are somewhat
obvious. They include less fuel
consumption, less wear and
tear on equipment, and less
erosion if the practices used
result in more straw or crop
residue left on the surface.. Yet
to be entirely proved is that
there is more water stored,
thereby increasing yield.
The disadvantages are a
higher cash cost and, perhaps,
more problems with conven
tional seeders plugging due to
increased crop residue.
Recent Oregon State Uni
versity cost studies indicate
slightly higher costs for the
chemical tillage concept,
which can be easily offset with
yield increases of one bushel
or more.
Growers are trying the new
practice on a trial basis in
most cases. THe ASCS office
in Morrow County will cost
BECAUSE THE FUTURE
OF GOOD EARTH IS IN
YOUR HANDS!
CONSERVATION IS
EVERYBODY'S CONCERN
BUT YOU AS A FARMER,
CAN PLAY AN ACTIVE
ROLE IN THE EFFORT TO
SAVE OUR NATURAL
RESOURCES AND ALL THAT
THEY PROVIDE.
WE WANT TO HELP, TOOl
TO GET THE CASH YOU
NEED TO BE CONSERVATION!
CONSCIOUS NOW1I
LET'S WORK TOGETHER - BECAUSE CONSERVATION IS EVERYBODY'S JOB!!
QMK OF
jjEastem Oregon
MEMBER
FEDERAL DEPOSIT
tour Home-Owned, Independent Ban"
ARLINGTON, HEPPNER AND IONE
INSURANCE CORPORATION
3J
iVAN ARSDALE CONST, co.
DIVERSION
DITCHES
LAND
LEVELING
mm--
. . . rnir'mrTnMiiiM-wu.;i.y1;;-,iivrt()iQ
ROAD CONSTRUCTION
(drtsncge our sptdcSty)
STOCK
PONDS
SILT
DAMS
ROCKING
FREE ESTIMATES &
RECOMMENDATIONS
2 DSs with Ripper
2 D6s
2 Graders
2-621 cerrydl (scrcper)
5 Denp Trucks
966 Front End Loader
call
Shop: 676-5083 Office: 676-5079
share on 50 acres for a
maximum of $fi per acre. This
allows the grower to try this
new concept on a limited
acreage and decide how it will
work for him under his
particular conditions.
Growers have a rather wide
variety of chemicals availahle
to use in this practice. They
can choose a fall-applied herb
icide such as Atrazine and
Bladex. Chem Hoe 135. or
Metrabuzin (Sencor or
Lexone ) . These products stop
growth of the weeds and
volunteer wheat or kill the
unwanted plants before they
extract moisture from the soil.
Spring-applied herbicides,
such as Roundup and Para
quat, kills the growth on
contact without leaving any
residue in the soil.
Each of these products has a
place and combinations of
chemicals may prove to be the
best way to go.
Don Rydrych, OSU weed
researcher, has been working
with these various products
for a number of years and is
the best source of information
on how successful this concept
has been.
If yields can be maintained
or slightly increased, the
chemical tillage concept has
enough advantages that many
growers will be willing to
adopt this new practice,
especially as fuel and equip
ment costs increuse at what
apiH-ars to be a disproportion
ate rate to other costs.
State Soil and Water
Commission merges with
State Agriculture Dept.
The Oregon Association of Conservation Districts pa sued a
resolution at its recent annual meeting supporting the
merger of the State Soil & Water Conservation Commission
with the Oregon Department of Agriculture.
The governor and some legislators proposed the merger
based on strengthening the commission and districts and as a
tax dollar savings' measure. It is believed the Oregon
" Department of Agriculture offers a number of advantages,
including a strengthened administrative capability and a
strong political base.
Although a majority of districts supported the resolution
there was some feeling of the commission and districts being
put in a position of not being able to say "no" without perhaps
losing the existing financial support to districts.
Important conditions in the resolution are:
1. Commission to remain appointed by the governor and
to remain a policy setting body.
2. A member of the commission to serve on the Board of
Agriculture with voting powers.
3. Commission members to be SWCD directors at time of
appointment.
4. Commission and staff to be a separate division with the
Department of Agriculture and current staff position to be
retained.
The OACD Executive Committee will now work with the
commission, Department of Agriculture, the governor's
office and legislators to implement the merger with these
conditions.
u
Bus SCHWADl
Heppner 676-9481
On the red!
Off the rood!
If We Can't
GUARANTEE
It We Won't Sell It
lYo'ro ycer ccrpkf o tin carter
X I w
1