Heppner gazette-times. (Heppner, Or.) 1925-current, January 15, 1981, Page EIGHT, Image 8

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    FNIIIT-The Heppner C.aieUe-Times, Heppner. Ortgon. Thursday, January 15. 1981
Two from Heppner attend
White House conference
John Canaday of Heppner,
has been selected as a
delegate to a White House
Mini Conference on Poverty
and the Elderly, January 13
-15. in Kansas City, Missouri,
by the State Community
Action Agency Association.
Also attending the three-day
conference as a staff worker is
Pat Brindle of the Heppner
Neighborhood center.
The conference will bring
together about 200 delegates
from 23 western states to
refine issues, establish prior
ities and develop recommen
dations. Trie delegates will
work in 11 small groups to
prepare resolutions on 11
issues for the general assem
bly scheduled during the
conference. Each of the resol
utions adopted by the confer
ence's general assembly will
be forwarded to the White
House Conference on Aging
(WHCoA), scheduled for Nov
ember 30 - December 3,1981, in
Washington, D. C.
The conference is sponsored
by the National Community
Action Agency Executive Di
rectors Association and the
Region VII (Kansas City)
office of Community Services
Administration. The standard
Methodist women
On Wednesday evening,
January 7, the Heppner circle
of United Methodist Women
met in the home of Anneta
Spicer. New officers were
installed by long-time mem
ber. Sylvia McDaniel: presi
dent. Ann Spicer; vice presi
dent. Louise Woods; secretary
Faye Pierce; and treasurer,
Pat Hyatt.
The group talked over 1980
accomplishments and 1981
plans. Out-going president
HHS counselor visits Air Force Academy
Michele Portmann, a coun
selor at Heppner High School,
recently visited the Air Force
Academy as a part of the
school's Educator Visit Pro
gram. The program is a vital
part of the academy's admis
sions effort.
According to Captain Joe
Strosnider, assistant director
of the Admissions Liaison
office here, "During the past
Students earn place on BMCC honor roll
Jeannie Piening, lone, and
Jannette Evans, Irrigon, were
among thirty-two Blue Moun
tain Community College stu
dents who received perfect 4.0
grade-point averages during
fall term. A 4.0 is a straight-A
report.
Other students earning a
place on the BMCC honor roll
by achieving grade-point av
erages of 3.5 or better (B-plus)
Two area youths
James G. Launer, son of
James J. and Beverly V.
Launer, Heppner has enlisted
in the delayed enlistment
program.
A student at Heppner High
School, Launer will go on
active duty in November.
After completing the six-week
basic training course at Lack
land AFB, Texas, he is
scheduled to receive technical
training as a fuel specialist.
He wil be earning college
credits through the Commu
demonstrate and answer all
FREE
DRAWING
$42
FIRE SET
FRI. ONLY
SALE PRICES
QRLEY
STOVE
REG. 602.50
$530
federal regions participating
in the conference are located
in Kansas City, Denver, Dal
las, San Francisco and Seat
tl. Wayne C. Thomas, CSA
Regional Director in Kansas
City, said the issues that will
be considered at the confer
ence are: retirement income,
employment, health services,
long-term cafe, transporta
tion, housing, energy, nutri
tion, elderly and the work
ethnic, rural services-delivery
and urban services-delivery.
Selection of conference del
egate is based on a formula
that entitles each state to
three delegates and allocates
the remaining delegates to
states according to the per
centage of elderly poor resid
ing in each state.
. Delegates must be at least
55 years of age, within CSA's
poverty guidelines and not a
current employee of a Com
munity Action Agency. The
state delegation should reflect
the state composition of race,
sex and urban-rural resid
ence. Canady is one of only
three persons in the state of
Oregon selected to partici
pate. install officers
Beth Bryant presided. Some of
the activities of the past year
were the May yard sale, the
honoring of graduating high
school seniors in the church,
improvements made in the
parsonage, continuation of the
baby-sitting program on Sun
day mornings and the group's
first successful participation
in the AAUW Artifactory.
It was determined that
similar activities would be
planned for 1981.
10 years, there's been a steady
increase in the number of
candidates and the number of
those candidates qualified for
the Academy. We believe this
can be attributed to the
growing number of educators
who have visited the acad
emy." Visiting educators are pri
marily high school counselors
who have frequent and direct
contact with students in the
are Melvin McCarl and Marie
Yocum of Lexington ; Kenneth
Bailey, Kathleen Kenny,
David McLachian and Lorrie
Smith of Heppner; Francine
Evans of Irrigon; and Carol
Donovan, Greg Tarpenning
and Sandra Tingley of Board
man. Among 177 students receiv
ing a grade-point average of
3.0 to 3.5 and earning a place
on the dean's list are Ron
enlist in Air Force
nity College of the Air Force
while attending basic and
other Air Force technical
training.
He was recruited by Sgt
John R. Hornbeek of the U.S.
Air Force Recruiting Office,
Walla Walla.
Kenneth A. Combs, son of
Sally L. Kukkert, Echo, enlist
ed in the Air Force in the
delayed enlistment program,
according to SSgt John R.
Hornbeek, Air Force recruiter.
FACTORY AUTHORIZED
REDUCTION SMI
CHI I AM 93
An ORLEY factory rep. will be here to
10 OFF
ALL STOVE
ACCESSORIES
FRI. ONLY
Heppner
V
tk.L
John Canaday
Gooseberry
Livestock
club meets
by Paula Palmer
The Gooseberry Livestock
Club held a 4-H meeting at the
home of Bob Van Schoiack on
January 11 at 3 p.m.
Club members watched two
sets of slides, one about fitting
and showing dairy, and the
other about ewe and lamb
management.
After the slides upcoming
events were discussed such as
the skating party Jan. 17, the
clown workshop Jan. 24, and
the steer weigh-in March 28.
Possible money raising pro
jects were also discussed.
It was decided that the next
meeting would be sometime in
March and that record books
would be discussed.
age groups the academy must
reach for its candidates.
Educators spend two days at
the academy.
Counselors become resident
academy experts in their
schools. They brief other
counselors and frequently be
come very active in identify
ing, motivating, and encour
aging potentially qualified
students.
Currin, Curtis Day, Maureen
Healy, Jacelyn Mollahan,
Currin, Curtis Day, Maureen
Healy, Jacelyn Mollahan,
Wendy Myers, Larry Palmer,
Campbell, Debra Jones and
Luella Taylor, Lexington; and
Donald Richards, Irrigon.
To be so honored, a student
must carry at least 12 graded
credit hours and may not have
received an 'F' grade in any
class.
program
A student at Heppner High
School, Combs will go on
active duty in November.
After completing the six-week
basic training at Lackland
AFB. Texas, he is scheduled to
receive technical training as a
fuel specialist.
He will be earning credits
toward an associate degree n
applied sciences through the
Community College of the Air
Force while attending basic
and other Air Force technical
training schools.
INVENTORY
questions.
FAST FIRE
STARTERS
Reg. 1.31
80c
676-9157
Highlights of
At a meeting at lone on Dec.
23. Don Peterson, past state
NFO president, reported on
highlights of the NFO conven
tion he and Ben Holdman of
Pendleton recently attended
in Cincinnati, Ohio. William
Landeen, staff member of the
NFO grain department from
Walla Walla, Wash., attended
and plans to spend some time
in Morrow County the week of
Jan. 19 through 23.
The NFO national conven
tion in Cincinnati was a
meeting of all major farm
commodities coming together
to coordinate contracting and
bargaining procedures.
Speakers included Dan
Morgan, author of "Mer
chants of Grain" who pointed
out that the ma jor grain trade
is an extensive global market
ing system that makes no
-vnr.
JUL
1 i
6 E3
I--
A Charger &
U Booster
M TJnnvT)lLtV
IN
Grease Gun
Special
Oil
Reg. 65'.
n
NFO convention related at
attempt to set price levels but
has found that low prices keep
the pipeline full.
Senator John Melcher of
Montana expressed a concern
about the increased debt load
of farmers. He talked of the
need for conservation, tax
revisions and said that we
shouldn't export below the
cost of production.
Representative Paul Find
ley of Illinois talked about the
need of income from the
market place and that trade
brings peace. He sighted the
trade with Japan as an
example.
Secretary of Agriculture
Bob Bergland pointed out that
the structure study of agri
cultural trends he conducted
last year will be released soon
and that It will show that
middle-sized farms are de
rt
JZTv a
Gas Can
2Vi Gallon
Reg. 10.25
Special Price 6.95
OFF SPECIAL PRICE
Battery Charge, Booster
& Tester 80-AmP
Reg. 217.34 Special Price 164.95
en
OFF SPECIAL
'in.Amn
Price 5.59
OFF SPECIAL PRICE
Spouts
Special Price 59
OFF SPECIAL
PRICE
creasing and that large scale
farms are producing more and
more of the agricultural
crops. He said that furm
programs and tax regulations
tend to be to the advantage of
large scale operations. He
said that it makes no sense to
export crops that are pro
duced at the expense of a loss
of soil, water and capital.
DeVon Woodland, national
press of NFO, said that
farmers' production is their
strength and that NFO has a
marketing system designed to
use that strength to negotiate
profit price levels for farmers.
He indicated thnt 2 percent
more from the consumer
dollar would bring balance
between the city and country
economies. He said there are
few buyers of farm products
and manv sellers which indi-
i I
D
PRICE
Jacks
Reg. 36.00
Special Price 34.00
OFF SPECIAL PRICE
4 "
mm "V
meeting
. eaten the need for farmers to
block production Into the
contracting process with these
ma jor buyers. He asked young
people how they were going to
become owner-operators and
said there is a title transfer of
land coming. He also asked to
whom will the existing owner
operators sell?
Grazing
fee drops
Grazing livestock on Bureau
of Land Management admin
istered lands, will be slightly
cheaper for ranchers this
year.
The 1981 grazing fee will be
$2.31 per animal unit month
(AUM), a drop of five cents
from last year's level. The
new rate Is effective March 1.
An AUM is the amount of
c
OFF ON THESE ITEMS!
Battery Charger
w
10-Amp
Reg. 48.95
Special Price 34.95
OFF
2 Flashlights
w Batteries
Package
Special Price 4.59
OFF SPECIAL PRICE
Filter Wrench
Reg. 4.95
Special Price
r""
Vim J
OFF SPECIAL PRICE
Cnn
n Mh tfmmm mm m.
Lexington 989-8221
forage one cow will eat during
a month.
Grazing fees ore based on a
formula contained in the 1978
Public RangelandH Improvc
, ment Act and accounts for
beef cattle prices, production
costs, and prices paid.
RFWAIU)
The Umatilla National Forest
Is offering a reward of up to
$200.00 for Information leading
to the arrest and conviction of
the person or persons who
broke Into and vandalized the
Tupper Guard Station on the
Heppner Ranger District
sometime between December
24, 19H0 and December 27,
1980. Anyone having Informa
tion Ik asked to call the Forest
Service Law Enforcement Of
fice at 276-3BU, ext. 254 or the
Pendleton office of the Fed
eral Bureau of Investigation
at 276-1433.
w x
SPECIAL PRICE N
3.29
'V V. 1
m
$
Extinguisher
Reg. 42.00
Special Price 34.95
a.
led
ti