Heppner gazette-times. (Heppner, Or.) 1925-current, June 05, 1980, Page FIVE, Image 5

Below is the OCR text representation for this newspapers page. It is also available as plain text as well as XML.

    8
The llcppncr f ;7tte-Time. Heppner, Oregon. Thursday. June 5. liWO-FlVE
Irrigon news
Frances Rooe
Wikon
922-3352
Many Irrigon and Board
man people attended recently
the 11th annual International
Foods Dinner and Talent
Show, The dinner and pro
gram were presented by the
Junior High students of the
north county area. This year,
the affair wua held in the new
Columbia Junior High School
building, which made It very
special.
There were several exotic
foods on the menu, such as
German sausage and saur
kraut, sweet and sour pork,
and also "volcanic Mt. Dew",
a beverage.
The auditorium was decor
ated to represent a tropical
paradise, and African safari,
and rural America. The
entertainment followed the
theme with Hawaiian music
and disco dancers.
Club to meet
The newly -formed Christian
Womens Club of Irrigon will
meet at Columbia View
Fellowship Church Monday
evening. June 8. at 7:30 p.m.
As a special feature for
June, several women will
model their wedding dresses.
There will he music by Vicki
Gale. Joey Duff will be the
speaker for the evening.
The meetings will be the
second Monday of each
month, with a charge of $1.50.
which will cover the cost of
efreshments and defray the
travel expense of the speak
ers. The meetings are nondc
nnminational, and all women
are welcome. No child-care is
provided.
From Guatemala
Special guests at Columbia
View Fellowship's Wednesday
evening Bible study were
Jackie Coppnns and Victorina
Morales of Guatemalu.
Miss Coppens, a missionary
with the Four-Square Church,
related many of her experien
ces on the mission field, and
then interpreted as Miss
O Morales shared her family's
tory of ministering in their
native country.
Victorina began assisting
her father in church services
by playing the accordion and
singing when she was 9 years
old. Now. at age 22, she has
had the responsibility of
establishing and overseeing
churches in 3 separate villag
es. 200th annivenary
A special bicentennial hon
oring the 200th birthday of the
Sunday school movement was
celebrated at the Columbia
View Fellowship during its
Sunday School hour June 1.
Highlights included a panto
mime skit portraying the
lineage of the Sunday school,
which had its humble begin
nings in Gloucester. The first
schools, led by Robert Raikes,
were more of an endeavor to
teach the poor children of
England to read and write.
However, the Bible was the
sole textbook, and the project
was so effective in improving
the quality of life in Glouces
ter's slums, the English gov
ernment patterned its national
education plan after it. Sun
day Schools have grown from
that beginning to the strong
institutions they are today.
'All Class Heppner
reunion
delayed to 'SI
The Heppner High School
"All Class Reunion" has been
cancelled until June of 1981
Unavoidable circumstances
have prohibited organizer
Carlila Bloodsworth from
making the proper arrange
ments. The reunion had been plan
ned for June 28 and 29 this
vear.
Top-hatted chimney sweep find
opportunity on area rooftops
by JiiNtine VVeatherford
When Paul Van Marter was
a junior at Heppner High
School, he begun working for
the Kinzua Mill
He kept on working at the
mill after his graduation in
197B He worked there until
Dec 21. 1979 When the mill
had to release many of its
workers, he was not at all
content to be unemployed.
Now he has become the first
full-time, professional chim
ney sweep in the Morjow-Gill-iam
Wheeler area.
He says he thought of taking
up this ancient trade for
several years before his
release from the mill He is
happy to tie associated with
the Jim Ackley Enterprises
9 from Morrow earn
Oregon State diplomas
Six students from lone and
three from Heppner were
graduated from Oregon State
University June 1.
Douglas Alex Cheney. Skye
Henry Krehs. Charles Thom
as McElligott and Joe David
Kietmann nil graduated from
OSU with Bachelor of Science
degrees in agriculture. They
are all from lone. Jerry Dean
Gentry, of Heppner, received
the same degree.
Michael A. Mills received a
B.S. degree in business and
James h Ployhar got his B.S.
degree in forestry. Both men
are from Heppner.
Two women from lone also
received B.S. degrees Kay E.
Bergstrom received her honor
in home economics and Sherri
K. Wilson got her degree in
forestry.
A total of 3.UU0 degrees were
presented at the II 1th annual
OSU commencement exercis
es. One of the graduating
seniors received the 90,000th
degree awarded by the uni-
Class of '50
get-together
get June 21
The 1950 class of Heppner
High School is planning a
reunion June 21 at the West of
Willow restaurant in Heppner.
Registration will be at 6:30
p.m. with dinner at 7:30.
The registration fee Is $10
per person, which will include
the dinner and a group picture
of those attending.
To pre-register or for futher
information, contact Marlene
Turner Peterson, Box 642,
Heppner. Her phone number
is 676-94W).
The class of 1949 has been
invited to j(rin the class of 1950
at the affair.
The Black Knight. Paul Vsn Marter. plies
and to be known as the Black
Knight.
So now you may see this
Black Knight going about his
work atop homes and com
mercial establishments in the
area garbed in his working
costume of ancient and histor
ic tradition. Van Marter
enjoys wearing the high top
hat. but does not perform in
the long, black, swallowtail
coat worn by movie chimney
sweeps.
The Black Knight's working
equipment includes a very
effective vacuum cleaner, a
collection of various sized and
types of brushes and shovels,
a long extension ladder and
several other ladders, buckets
and bags for carrying away
versity since its founding in
1870. when the class graduated
one woman and two men.
Coming
Salad Bar
June
TOO
featuring
The r ugitivcs
and Jeanette
Dance 9:00 P.M.-?
Friday and
Saturday
June 6-7
Elks & Out of
his trade.
the soot and coke that he
removes from chimneys and
large, clean canvases that he
carefully uses to protec
interiors. He moves the equip
ment and himself from job to
job in his green pickup.
Van Marter studied about
his chosen work for some time
and made some practice nir,:
before he began serving
customers May 15 Since th;:t
time he has kept quite busy
doing this work that he says he
really enjoys. If he keeps busy
during the springs, sunvr.crs
and falls, he may ,e a!i" to
move himself and his equip
ment to a warmer chnia'e
during the winters' sr.c
ice.
Whitman degree
Whitman College h;
19H0 commencement v:
es May 25 at 1! a m
college's amphitheater
Robert S. Jones, sen i
and
n t: -
f Mr
and Mrs Roliert A. Jcne.,
Box 744. Heppner !''
bachelor's degree.
Event!
Baked Potato Ck i
7
er
Town Guests Only
Steak Frw
I saiei54ya
f$f 1 f V XO-In. Deluxe Mower
4-U Gem CI
ohn Day Valley
My Ki am ( -s nose Wilou
Ihc 4 H (Jcnt and Geology
C'lui) ! a f !)(! trip to (.'amp
Ii,ticf.ck ;ni! the sui rounding
ai'ea vf tin ,J(i:n Day Valley in
(arch of s.'iuipics for their
R(?o!'ny (ii'f.jt'fts.
Th- frri.'on 4 J I club joined
with the Heppner club for the
excursion. Mr, and Mrs.
HiolKiJ S Curtis are leaders of
the fJiib and .jci'onipanit'd the
group. !,'"( WiKim. -j-tt lead
er, an.l Marge Shadb, a
former Jearitr. accompanied
Mie Ircjon clsib. wltti five
mrrr.Jjfcrs foiiig on the trip.
TT.osa C.iArvn Dike,
I'atrick loi;rel!. Susan Ev
iiii -. ",n;ii' and (iibh
Kv.ms
Toev vciu-d the Richard
son (, f;o;.k hhr.p and the
Hi id.! fi'iiple cl( t
Conrue Quigley
to marry
i" Quley of Penrfie
- of Darlene
ii of Her ner and Ron '
' ' " B-'iRej , is planning
-y Va if p-irtljerg in a
''"?rmit!.
tv. ! trim Iexington
' the sot: of Colleen
J '.;
W.iii
1 1
BergKtrnrn ot Heppner.
The 'Aoiidim' s planned for
12 .-r 1 p m. at the First
Clr': :'": f "bunSi in Heppner.
fVt LaJtrande
regnn
er Music
une 2-27
Crande.
r, to all
Id
s i'je 14 er
i mat:on.
i s (.mi er ic tact
.J !)'(":
.-. imr M'r-ii-i
of Hum.'in-
.;;,,, S'i.t.'
f; r:;
v.ir-
D.re.
n
ext
i .J
i'tJ t- ' -ii I SALE NOW cr"5
vf-':p u Sale I79t5 1M
fk' 'T': H HORIELiTE
' : " ' I I YOUR CHAIN SAV a
c; I ACCESSOflY HEADQUARTERS !
tib visits
Thunder Egg hunting area on
the PrMay Ranch near Mad
ras. Each 4-H member was
allowed to take one. These
were sawed open that evening,
after returning to Camp
Hancock . The thunder eggs all
had blue agate centers but
each was different from the
other, with white markings.
A film was shown that
evening concerning volcanoes
of the Northwest.
The next day the group
visited a cinnabar mine that
had been actively mined
during WWII and has been
closed since 1954. The mine
was called the Horse Heaven
mine and is located in the hills
near Ashwood.
The 4-H members collected
samples of cinnabar, from
which mercury is taken. Other
samples they found on the trip
included clinoptilolite. and
orange crystal and mordenite,
both zeolite formation Later
they beat away on rocks to get
samples of natrolite, a fuzzy
substance found near the John
Day River.
lone student
wins honors
at graduation
Joel Peterson, son of Mr.
and Mrs. Donald Peterson of
lone, graduating magma cum
laud from Pacific Luth
eran University in Tacoma.
Wash. May 25.
Peterson received his Bach
elor of Science degree in
engineering and physics.
He graduated from lone
High School in 1975.
The university awarded de
grees to 651 bachelor's and
master's candidates.
College Theatre
sets plays for
season
College-Community Theatre
productions for the 1980-81
season have been set by the
OCT board of directors.
"There are Crimes and
Crimes" by August Stindberg
will be the fall production.
Winter term the drama
urnup will stage "The Devil's
Disciple" by George Bernard
Shaw.
The popular Irner and
Loewe musical "Brigadoon"
will be presented spring term
asttooas
ft
TOTAL HARDWARE
IH & "fl; tl r 2 9 til l -a IS 11 Si If s r J a a ,
i2 . a'", vertical pull ilarter, 5-potltton
1 V htghl adluttan, loldlng handle
2 and mora. 4S1-2046
I'll r
Hr) 5J .. I I.. .
Kindergarten students in Heppner 'Do the Hokey Pokey' at
the grade school music concert last week.
Early cutoffs slated
in OSU enrollments
For the fourth time in six
years. Oregon State Univer
sity has announced early
cutoffs, or deadlines, for new
student applications this fall
as a way to avoid acute
over -enrollment problems.
July 1 will be the deadline
for new freshman applica
tions. These include high
school graduates and those
who have attempted 1-14
graded quarter hours of col
lege academic work.
Aug. 1 will be the cutoff date
for new undergraduate trans
fer applicants. These include
all students who have at
tempted 15 or more graded
quarter hours of college aca
demic work, but who have not
yet earned a bachelor's de
gree. Exceptions will be made for .
ssesssesssssssGS
- f
... A
'HAM Vi
I would like to take this time to thank each and every friend
and voter that gave me their support in the primary by
writing in my name for candidate for Sheriff of Morrow
County.
..Thanks again, all 300 of you. It's great that 300 people
would go out of their way to write in my name. I will do my
best to be fair to all. I will not let you down.
. .I'll see you in November, when my name is on the ballot.
?
students from community col
leges who have completed two
years of study. They will be
permitted to apply until Sept.
1. ,
Sept. 1 will be the stepped
up application date for new
graduate applicants those
who have earned a bachelor's
degree and who are seeking
admission to OSU for regular
graduate, post-baccalaureate,
or graduate special status.
The cutoffs, or freezes, do
not affect any students who
are now attending OSU. Appli
cants who have previously
attended OSU may be admit
ted and enroll for fall term in
any student category for
which they are eligible.
"Their continued enrollment
is assured," President Robert
MacVicar emphasized.
ff
Bud Englert
HEPPNER
''OTOR O"1
Sale 92c
PennzoU Motor OU
10W3O or 10W40 PtniuoH motor
oil 7M-O103, res-oia
f
I
(r If