Heppner gazette-times. (Heppner, Or.) 1925-current, January 24, 1980, Page TWELVE, Image 12

Below is the OCR text representation for this newspapers page. It is also available as plain text as well as XML.

    TWKI.VK The Ileppner Gazette-Times, lleppner, Oregon. Thursday, January 24, 1!S0
Burglars hit Office Tavern in lone and Boardman beauty salon
Orville Cutsforth, Rt 2 Box
2082 in Hcppner, reported to
the Morrow County Sheriff's
Office this week that the two
.30 caliber Luger pistols he
reported stolen recently were
returned. He found them in his
pickup truck on the seat.
Whoever returned the guns
did not ask for the reward
Cutsforth was offering.
Other cases reported by the
sheriff include: the Office
Tavern in lone had $30 taken
when someone broke open the
back door and entered the
building. The owner of the
tavern is Montie Lee Crum.
Akers Trailer Court in lone.
Billie June Akers, P.O. Box
2f5 in lone, reported the
money missing to the sheriff's
office. There was $150 in the
box that the money was taken
from.
Sandra Maxwell, Rt, 2 Box
5-12 in Irrigon, reported that
Ronald Curtis Maxwell's 1974
Honda Z 50 was stolen from
their shed. The gold motorcy
cle was valued at $100.
Rob Leichleiter. Sandpiper
Apis. No. 4 in Boardman.
reported the theft of $150 in
cash ;ind $70 in checks from
the One Step Hair Stylos on
Columbia Avenue in Board
man. Leichleiter, the owner.
said the front door was kicked
in. Among the stolen checks
was one for $40 with the payee
line lefl blank.
Morrow County receives $64,629
The State Highway Division
has distributed $16,892,385.99
in highway user fees to the 36
counties of the state during the
period July 1 to Dec. 31, 1979.
H. Scott Coulter, state high
way engineer, said recently.
Morrow County with 8,628
registered vehicles, received
$64,629.79.
Multnomah County, with
437,242 registered vehicles.
$3,276,614.07.
The allocation is based on
the statutory 20 percent, with
the appropriation being made
on a monthly basis.
The funds come from the
following sources: motor vehi
cle registration and operator's
license fees, gasoline tax, use
fuel tax, motor carrier fees,
and fines and penalties collec-
and weight statutes from
citations issued by Highway
Division weighmasjlers.
The allocation to each
county is based on (he number
of vehicles registered in it
during the year. This year's
allocation is approximately $2
million less than for the same
period a year ago when the
counties recived
$18,701,235.88. The decrease is
attributed primarily to the gas
Forestry agent
staff for two
A new agent, who will
conduct a forestry education
program in Grant and Morrow
Counties, has joined the Ore
gon State University Exten
sion Service.
Maurice Mitchell will be
respo sible for educational
programs related to the pro
duction and management of
timber products and the
management of timber and
received the most money with ted for violations of the size shortage.
Enviromental Impact statement released
It is estimated the Heppner
Unit of the Umatilla National
Forest will supply nine million
more board feet of wood. 133
more wood fiber jobs. $513
million to the county but 140
fewer elk.
Those statistics are part of
the Final Environmental Im
pact Statement for the Hepp
ner Planning Unit. Land
Management Plan, that has
been researched by the USDA
Forest Service.
The Forest Service has
prepared a 486 page book with
maps of the land in the
Heppner Unit and recommen
ded a plan on how the land
should be used so it will
benefit the county the most.
Five management alterna
tives were prepared and
Alternative E was selected as
the best for the Heppner Unit.
Alternative E emphasizes a
high level of timber produc
tion. It also placed an empha
sis on domestic livestock
grazing, semi remote recrea
tional areas and less than half
of the unit will be planned for
optimum wildlife habitat to
support a high level of elk.
Of the 271,155 acres in the
Heppner Unit, 78.000 acres
will allow timber harvesting
and domestic grazing only if
the elk habitat can be opti
mized. About 24,000 acres of
that land will have road
restrictions.
The other 168,000 acres will
emphasize timber production
and domestic grazing and
roads will remain open as long
as there is no resource
damage.
Alternative E was selected
over the other alternatives.
Alternative A emphasized
wood fiber production, domes
tic grazing and maintaining
wildlife levels.
Alternative B blends the
amenity of land management
and commodity products with
a major emphasis on recrea
tion in the forests, wood fiber
production, domestic grazing
and the least important aspect
of that plan, to supply an elk
habitat.
Alternative C placed its
emphasis on timber harvest
and domestic grazing and
Alternative D planned for the
development of recreation,
with timber production second
in importance and elk habitat
third.
Some of the projected envi
ronmental impacts for the
Heppner Unit with the imple
mentation of Alternative E
include:
An increase of today's 33
million board feet of wood to
42 million.
Wood fiber jobs up from 490
to 623.
Money returned to the
county up from $1,881 million
to $2,394 million.
And a drop in elk from 4,440
to 4.300.
The impact statement was
studied by the public, an
interdisciplinary team, state
and local government agen
cies. The major issues of consi
deration were outdoor recrea
tion opportunities, wood fiber
yield, forage for domestic
livestock grazing, habitat di
versity for wildlife, water
quantity and quality, soil
productivity. Rocky Mountain
Elk and road use.
Ren Seminoe of the Ranger
District office in Heppner said
Alternative E will be imple
mented Feb. 9.
He said the impact state
ment is a guideline for the
allocation of the Heppner Unit
land to emphasize different
land uses for the forest
resources.
He said the Forest Service
land will be used to supply the
"greatest good for the great
est number of people."
Seminoe said the impact
statement will help them to
manage the resources avail
able. "It took several years of
planning (to decide on a
management alternataive. re
search and to prepare the
impact statement)." Seminoe
said.
on Extension
counties
rangeland resources, accord
ing to H A. Wadsworth. OSU
Extension director.
In addition. Mitchell will
work with private timber
owners and public agencies,
said Harold Kerr. Morrow
County Extension staff chair
man. His work is intended to
help people make sound tim
ber management decisions on
public and private lands.
Mitchell will be located in
the Grant County Extension
office in Canyon City. He can
be contacted by calling the
Morrow County Extension
office. 676-9642.
Since 1974, Mitchell has
been an instructor and forest
land manager at Mississippi
State University in Starkville.
He managed the university's
8.200 acres of forest land and
taught courses in forestry.
Prior to that, he was a forester
with the Arizona State Land
Department in Phoenix. He
obtained and distributed tree
seedlings to land owners, and
provided assistance to small
woodland owners and
resource conservation dis
tricts. Mitchell attended Northern
Arizona University, where he
received a bachelor's degree
in forestry in 1970. He received
his master's degree in forest
ry from the same school in
1972.
The new agent is a member
of the Society of- American
Foresters and the American
Forestry Association.
He began working in the
Grant-Morrow County exten
sion offices on Dec. 31.
David Dee Schwarzin. P.O.
Box 381 in Heppner, reported
that he ran into and killed a
cow on Highway 74 while he
was driving his 1969 Mercury
Montego. The cow was owned
by Charles J. Daly of Butter
Creek.
John Raymond Cook, Rt. fi
Box 6714 in Caldwell, Idaho,
reported some tools stolen. He
reported that he was in an
accident and the tools in the
back of his truck were thrown
out. When he returned to get
them, they were gone.
Roscoe Wesley Moore Jr.,
306 Columbia Court in Board
man, violated a court order by
contacting his wife. Cassie. He
was lodged in the Hermiston
Safety Center for violating the
restraining order,
Naomi Sarrah Hum repor
ted that Deborah Franke's
1970 Chevy Nova worth $1,000
wsa taken from the Hum
residence.
In other sheriff's news
Virgil Cook, a security guard
for PGE, reported a burglary
of two guns.
Lisa Collins reported the
loss of a diamond ring but it
was later found.
Randy Zimmerman, Mari
lyn Collette and James Judd
were cited for having an open
container in a car.
Vickie Pate of Irrigon repor
ted a stolen Yamaha 80 that
was later recovered.
Northwestern Livestock Comm. Co.
Special Sales
Hermiston, Oregon Wed., Jan. 30, 1980
Horse Heaven Hereford Ranch Production Sale
Selling 50 range-ready bulls
Featuring sons of
Real Even MoJo High Standard Lad 23 FoHH Rebel Bob No. 81
Abo 15 heifers calves and 15 bred heifers bred to HH Buck and LiDom R-802
KenTrout,Auctioneer
For more information call Horse Heaven Hereford Ranch. 509-894-4500.
OOOOOOOOOO 0000000000060000000
Special Feeder Sale
Tues. February 5
With weather cor&j ecsing up we are expecting a good run of feeder
cattle for this sale. A strong local market benefits you the producer.
No one knows what cattle are worth now or what cattle will
be worth later this spring. Even with uncertainties we have
seen the past 12 months, cattle prices have been better than
ever. Prices all over the country are established bv livestock
I auction markets. j
Licensed & bonded for your protection
Operating under government regulations
t 4
r ouarameea paymenT
No pencil shrink
ic Accurate weights
Northwestern Livestock Commission Co.
Don Grauer evenings
(503) 567-6655 ( 503) 567-3111
Gary Miller,
(503) 565-3275
Eddie Cole, Manager
(503 ) 296-4672
Exxsn
OS DDOTE QMS IF C3EC7
1
ofn
NEITJ SUBARUS
STOCK
mmmi fmmM .-. Iw... J amimmmimmm0r Xi
U r i
E3EUJ SUOARUS
OH THEIR 11 M
ML ftiOGMELS
I G3SE
f?Q(tCl
MS 4n4
UAGOWS-BRATS
AMD IHATCHDACCf S
PONTIAC
m
UE'VE SOT f.lOST
E,1BEILS BH STOCK
incLUDino'
Till EVER POPULAR
5 Si?15) (LK S
"?rr -r
I'M ARE EIJ A SALE COTEST AKi UE UAWT
TO OT3...S UJE ARE REALLY DEALIH6
(HBCBGnMBED
TRUCKS
IF YOU'VE 0? A JOB
0 ...l"JE'VE SOT
TE1E TRUCK 7
CIAHBLE IT!
POOTPS
2 ACID 4 17E1EEL DRIVE
end
III STOCK
WhSjf1nfai-"-(?.f0....)
- If "TV f- A... fH