Heppner gazette-times. (Heppner, Or.) 1925-current, November 26, 1942, Page 4, Image 4

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    4 Heppner Gazette Times, November 26, 1942
Heppner
Gazette Times
THE HEPPNER GAZETTE
Established March 30. 18S3
THE HEPPNER TIMES
' Established November 18, 1897
CONSOLIDATED FEBRUARY 15, 1912
Published Every Thursday bv
CRAWFORD PUBLISHING COMPANY
and entered at the Post Oliice at Heppner,
Oregon, as second-cbis matter.
O. G. CRAWFORD, Editor
SUBSCRIPTION RATES
One Year $2.50
Two Years 4.59
Three Years 6.00
Six Months 1.25
Three Months C5
Single Copies 05
there is more assurance that the un- 25th Anniversaries
derprivileged will be taken care of and Qh)ServecJ bv Jwo
the battle against tuberculosis, not u ,
lost. h-qht Mile Loupies
It will be a direct contribution to the
Allied cause if we buy even more than
the county's quota of seals. In brief,
it will be just one more evidence of our
intention to win the war by keeping ev
erybody in a healthy working condition.
No welfare fund is better expended
than that placed in the hands of the
Oregon Tuberculosis association.
-o-
mill
W!- V&--yss Kit- '' v
CAUSE FOR THANKSGIVING
Thanksgiving will not be the same to
most of our people this year. It could
not be the same in the light of what is
going on in the world. Yet there is
cause for Thanksgiving, be it lacking
in the spirit that governs peacetime ob
servance of the day.
For most of the country it may be
said we are thankful for bountiful
harvests. That is encouraging to our
cause and discouraging to the Axis. It
was part of their plan to see that crops
would not be harvested in this and
other countries of the western hemi-
sphere.
Recent developments in Africa and
the south Pacific also give us reason to
be thankful thankful that we have
the machinery of war and the men to
handle it.
In conclusion let us be thankful that
we still have the right to observe
Thanksgiving as free men and women ;
that we can still vote as we please with
no Gestapo looking over our shoulders
to see that we vote the "right" way.
So long as this condition prevails we
can look forward to each Thanksgiv
ing day with a feeling of pride in a na
tion for which our valiant sons are giv
ing their all to preserve.
o
MORE ESSENTIAL THAN EVER
With all these drives, going on for
war materials and the constant ham
mering on war bonds and stamps there
is danger of overlooking some of the
important matters pertaining to civil
ial welfare. This should not happen,
for it is essential that the health of
those remaining at home should be
maintained. Otherwise- the well-being
of our fighting forces would be jeopar
dized. Monday saw the opening of the an
nual sea sale sponsored by the Oregon
Tuberculosis association. Upon the re
sults of that sale rests the effective
operation of the Morrow County health
association. If our people are not liber
al with their purchases, of seals the
work in this county will be impaired.
On the other hand, if the quota is met
SCRAP DRIVE IMPORTANT
Morrow county cannot rest on her
laurels and allow7 that other 50 to 55
percent of scrap iron and steel to rust
in the fields and barnyards. Every
pound of the metal will be needed in
forthcoming months to keep the muni
tion and armament streams flowing
steadily to the front. Winning of the
October award is the best argument
for driving ahead to greater accom
plishment, not for the glory, which in
itself is not to be ignored, but for the
invaluable service we may render in
the prosecution of a successful war on
our enemies.
A clean-up drive is scheduled for
Friday and Saturday of this week. It
is not expected that this effort will par
allel the October drive when 1,194,000
pounds of scrap iron and steel was
weighed in. It will serve to fill demands
of the conversion plants during the
winter months when gathering and
delivering of the metal will be imprac
tical. The greater the scrapiron piles
this winter the less, demand for them at
a time when farmers must attend to
their field work. Full cooperation at
this time will relieve the pressure later
and at the same time assure the boys at
the front that the boys at home are
carrying on their share of the fight.
o
WHAT DOES IT MATTER?
Weather has. always been something
to talk about when other subjects were
lacking. It has its pleasant aspects as
wrell as disagreeable features, and as
such forms a topic upon which most of
us can express opinions.
Since the clays of Pearl Harbor there
has been less said about the weather,
particuarly in combat zones, because
of the possibility of lending aid and
comfort to the enemy. Consequently,
a subject which frequently made the
headlines has, been conspicuous in its
absence the past several months.
There is no disposition to let down
the bars, at this time but there can be
no harm in mentioning the fact that
fall weather conditions have been fav
orable to the grain grower, and even
the stockman is beginning to appre
ciate the attentions of the weather
man. These facts can't possibly hold
comfort for the enemy for it means,
that the food production line will be
maintained in harmony with war pro
duction lines. It is just as well not to
predict or forecast weather conditions,
especially as long as, the enemy may be
lurking near our shores, yet a limited
forecast such as on frost conditions, in
areas where fruits are predominant
has been granted. But what does it
matter if weather that has, already
happened is mentioned or discussed?
The Leonard Carlson home on
Fight Mile was the scene of a p?r
tv Sunday evening when friends
gathered to help Mr. and Mrs
Leonar Carlson and Mr. and Mrs.
Henry Baker observe the 25th
wedding anniversaries. An enjoyable
evening was spent in playing games
end visiting, augmented with mu
sic bv Mildred and Lewis Carlson
?nd Betty and Helen Fay Baker.
A bountiful lunch including
chicken sandwiches, pickles, ice
cream, wedding cake and coffee was
,cerved. A four-tier wedding cake
b?aiing a bride and groom under
an archway of flowers, graced the
center of the table. Mrs. Carlson
and Mrs. Baker cut the wedding
cake, Mrs. Ben Anderson poured
coffee and Mrs. Henry Peterson
served the ice cream.
For this very special occasion
Mrs. Cailson wore a black velvet
dress and Mrs. Baker a blue velvet
dress, each carrying corsages of
gardenias and rosebuds. Mr. Carl
son and Mr. Baker displayed bou
toniers of pink carnations in hon
or of the occasion.
Guests included: Mr. and Mrs.
Henry Peterson and family; Mr.
and Mrs. Ray Drake; Mr. and Mrs.
Ben Anderson; Mr. and Mrs. Al-
gott Lundell; Mr. and Mrs mil
Carlson; Mr. and Mrs. Claude
Huston; Bernar Carlson; Oscar
Peterson and daughter; Mrs. Carl
Bergstrom and daughter; Mrs. Ce
cil Lutkins; Mrs. Noel Dobyns and
daughter; Mrs. John Darst and Mrs.
Harley Anderson.
Dr. W. H. Rockwell
Naturopathic
Physician & Surgeon
Gilman Eldg.
Office hours: 1 p. m. to 7:30 p. m.
Exam free Ph. 522 Heppner, Or.
Phelps Funeral Home
Licensed Funeral Directors
Phone 1332
Heppner, Ore.
j. O. Turner
ATTORNEY AT LAW
Phone 173
Hotel Hoppiier Building
HEPPNER. ORE.
A. D. McMurdo, M. D.
PHYSICIAN & SURGEON'
Trained Nurse Assistant
Office in Masonic Building
Heppner, Oregon
Heppner
Abstract Co.
J. LOGIE RICHARDSON. Mgr
RATES EEASONABI.il
Roberts Building Heppner, Or
P. W. Mahoney
ATTORNEY AT LAW
GENERAL INSURANCE
Heppner Hotel Building
Willow St. Entrance
MARTHA JANE NEEL
Funeral services were conducted
in Condon Saturday morning at the
Community Congregational church
for Martha Jane Neel, with Rev.
Martin Clark of Heppner officiat
ing. Interment was in the Hardman
cemetery.
Martha Jane Swain was born
Feb. 11, 1854 in McNary county,
Tenn. In 1872 she was married to
Richard Robison in that state. To
this union 8 children were born,
all of whom: survive, excepting
their first child, Lulu Bell who
died at the age of 18 months.
All seven children were at their
mother's bedside when she passed
away. They are: Motie, Woodland,
Calif.; Tyndall, Bonanza, Ore.; Lo
tus, Heppner; OUie Adkins, Condon;
Marie Whittington, Bend; Walter,
Merrill, Ore.; Josie Chappell, Con
don. She also leaves 11 grandchild
ren, 25 great grandchildren, one
stepdaughter, Lellie Perry of Walla
Walla.
CLEANING
SERVICE
Wednesday-Thursday-Friday
HEPPNER CLEANERS
J. O. Peterson
Latest Jewelry and Gift Ooodn
Watches . Clocks . Diamond
Expert Watch and Jewelry
Repairing
Heppner. Oregon
NEW AUTO POLICY
Bod. Inj.
Class A C.30
Class B 7.00
Class C 9.80
Pr. Dam.
5.10
5.44
6.80
l W. TURNER & CO.
RFCOVERNG IN HOSPITAL
Mrs. B. F. Swaggart is reported
recovering from a serious illness at
Heppner hospital. She was brought
to town about a week ago. Her dau
ghter, Mrs. C. S. Wheeler of Pendle
ton, has been with her and will
remain until her mother is fully
recovered.
Heppner City Council
Meets First Monday Each Month
Citizens having matters for dis
cussion, please bring before
the Council
J. O. TURNER, Mayor
RAINS IVAMAGE ROADS
Country reads suffered some
damage as a mult of the heavy rain
which visited this section Monday
afternoon, according to Ernie John
son who was in town Tuesday from
his ranch on upper Balm fork.
Ditches were iilled with mud and
debris.
Dr. L. D. Tibbies
OSTEOPATHIC
Physician & Surgeon
FIRST NATIONAL BANK BLD(i.
Rec. Phone 1162 Office Phone 492
HEPPNER. OREGON
Professional
Directory
Jos. J. Nys
ATTORNEY AT LAW
Peters Building, Willow Street
Heppner. Oregon
McCLINTOCK'S
Welding and
Repair Shop
SEE US OR TELEPHONE 822
Morrow County
Abstract fir Title Co.
INC.
ABSTRACTS OP TITLE
TITLE INSURANCE
Office in New Peters Building
-O-
M. L. CASE G. E. NIKANDER
Directors of
Funerals
8G2 Phones 2(52
After witnessing the results of nu
merous football games we have arriv
ed at tha conclusion that the team
chalking up the most touchdowns us
ually wins the game.
O. M. YEAGER
CONTRACTOR & BUILDER
All kinds of carpenter work
Country work especially
When Eating in The Dalles
REMEMBER
JEFF'S CAFE
GEORGE COOK, Prop.