Heppner gazette-times. (Heppner, Or.) 1925-current, November 24, 1938, Page Page Three, Image 3

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    .Thursday, Nov. 24, 1938
Heppner Gazette Times, Heppner, Oregon
Pag Thrca
LBONGTOX NEWS
Dick, Brown Cars
Damaged in Smash
By MARGARET SCOTT
An accident occurred Saturday
evening on the Lexington-Heppner
nignway. ine cars involved were
driven by Mrs. L. E. Dick and Chris
Brown. Although neither was in
jured, the cars were badly damaged.
Mrs. Terrel Benge and baby
daughter have returned home from
Portland.
Mr. and Mrs. Ted McDaid are tak
, ing a vacation in Michigan. Mr. Mc
Daid's farm work is being done by
Jim York.
Harold Townsend visited with his
family Saturday evening from his
farm work at Cecil.
George Peck was a Portland vis
itor last week.
Mr. and Mrs. Orville Cutsforth
and Fritz, Kenneth and Pat are vis
iting in Portland.
Mrs. Harold Townsend and chil
dren were guests of Alta Cutsforth
at her home in Heppner Sunday
night.
Church services will be held in
the Congregational church at 7:30
p. m. Sunday. C. E. will be at 6:30
p. m. Sunday school will be held at
10 a. m. at the Christian church.
Mrs. Mose Duran entertained at
her home with a dinner and dancing
party one evening last week. Guests
were Mr. and Mrs. Cecil Jones,
Grace Turner and Ray Phillips.
Mr. and Mrs. Lavirence Patrick
and small daughter, Mildred Elaine,
of Boise, Idaho, were visitors at the
A. M. Edwards home Friday.
Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Reade and
son of Spray were business visitors
in town Friday.
Ira Lewis left Wednesday to visit
in Iowa with his brother.
Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Scott motored
to Hardman Sunday, taking Mrs.
Neal Knighten and children to their
home.
Rae Cowins was a week-end vis
itor in Heppner this week.
Mr. and Mrs. Earl Eskelson of
Lonerock are guests at the home of
Mr. and Mrs. Bob Cutler.
Fred Beymer and family were
visiting old-time friends here last
week. The Beymers, who are former
residents of this community, now
are engaged in the restaurant bus
iness in Hermiston. Mr. Beymer is a
brother of Tom Beymer of Heppner.
Wm. D. Campbell motored to
Beaverton over the week end to get
Mrs. Campbell and daughters, Patsy
and Nancy Jane.
Maude Pointer left Friday for a
visit in Salem.
Ballard Lists Factors
In Extension Work
Successful administration of ex
tension work within a state -seeks
the furtherance of a well coordinated
program in the interests of the farm
population, rather than the mere at
tainment of high sounding statistical
goals, F. L. Ballard, vice-director in
charge of extension in Oregon, told
the National Association of Land
Grant colleges in one of the princi
pal speeches delivered at the recent
convention in Chicago.
The invitation to Ballard to speak
on "What Constitutes Effective Ex
tension Administration Within a
State," was generally recognized as
a high compliment to the type of ad
ministration used in Oregon.
Ballard pointed out that any ex
tension service must guard against
the repetition of established and
nnco successful activities to the
point "where such walls of self-es
teem are built up that the entire
process is in a rut." He said that the
first requirement in effectiveness is
to recognize the necessity of periodic
change.
In summing up, Ballard pointed
out that three chief factors contrib
ute to effective administration. These
are, first, the extension service well
established as the leading agency in
assisting to develop and carry out a
sound agricultural program. Second,
a coordinated, well-trained person
nel, with adequate compensation
and recognized professional stand
ing. Third, making the most of op
portunities for maintaining sound
and fair off-campus relationships
which will be reflected in financial
support and growth in proportion to
the success achieved.
Annual Wild Life
Conference to be
At OSC Dec. 1 and 2
Careful consideration and discus
sion of Oregon's wild life problems
by the various agencies concerned,
with a view to finding successful
solutions, is to be the aim of the
third annual Oregon Wildlife confer
ence to be held on the Oregon State
college campus December 1 and 2,
according to those in charge of ar
rangements. The meetings will be
open to the public, with everyone in
terested in wild life invited to at
tend. . 1
Among the featured out-of-state
speakers will be Carl D. Shoemaker,
secretary of the National Wildlife
Federation and a former Oregonian,
who will speak at the annual ban
quet Thursday night, as well as dur
ing the Thursday morning session;
and J. C. Sayler, in charge of the
division of wildlife refuges of the
U. S. biological survey.
The conference will be opened by
William J. Smith, Portland, presi
dent of the Oregon Wildlife federa
tion, and Dr. George W. Peavy,
president of the college, will give
the address of welcome. Other speak
ers at the anual banquet will be
Governor Charles H. Martin, hon
orary president of, the Oregon fed
eration; and Governor-elect Charles
A. Sprague. E. F. Averill, past-president
of the Oregon group, will be
toastmaster. Another feature of the
banquet program will be the show
ing of wildlife motion pictures by
Dr. W. L. Finley, vice-president and
regional director of the National
Wildlife federation.
The first part of the Thursday af-
ternoon program will be devoted to
the mule deer problem of eastern
Oregon, with representatives of the
forest service, the livestock industry
and the U. S. biological survey pre
senting their views on the subject.
Later in the afternoon, Dr. Phillip
A Parsons of the State Planning
board, will present the board's con
servation program, and Dr. Finley
will discuss the Pittman-Robertson
bill, both under the general topic of
"Oregon's Opportunity for the Future."
The Friday morning session will
be given over to presentation and
discussion of proposed legislation.
Committee reports, election of offi
cers and other business will come
Friday afternoon, following talks by
Mr. Shoemaker and H. H. Stage,
secretary of the Oregon federation.
Burton H. Peck was in town Mon
day from the Lexington farm home.
He returned to the county Sunday
from Portland, where he attended
sessions of the national grange convention.
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