Heppner gazette-times. (Heppner, Or.) 1925-current, November 04, 1937, Page PAGE FIVE, Image 5

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HEPPNER GAZETTE TIMES, HEPPNER, OREGON, THURSDAY, NOV. 4, 1937
PAGE FIVE
LmiD Hupp
B. A. McDowell was treated at a
local doctor's office Tuesday for a
dislocated left shoulder received at
the C. A. Warren ranch on Dry
Fork where he was working. The
injury was sustained when he reach
ed up protect himself against a
telephone wire under which he was
driving a tractor, the wire jerking
the arm out of place. An internal
hemorrhage was also suffered. He
was taken to the home of Mrs. Phil
Griffin in this city.
M. E. Duran was among farmers
of the Lexington district transacting
business in the city Tuesday. He re
ported having been busy burning
straw on his fields preparatory to
fall seeding which he expected to
start soon. His section of Blackhorse
was favored by recent rains which
visited the county, although more
moisture would be welcome.
Mr. and Mrs. Neal Bleakney from
Boardman spent several hours in the
county seat Monday on business.
Mr. Bleakney called at the judge's
office to find out about the new
weed control set-up and reported
the noxious weed situation to be
quite bad on the project.
Young full-blooded R. I. Red and
Barred Plymouth Rock riosters for
breeding, from stock equalling leg
horns for egg production. This stock
sells from hatchery for $3. My price
is $1.50 & $2. Mrs. Victor H. Myers,
Boardman, Ore. 35.
Viola Herm of Yakima county,
Wash., and William F. Botts of Mor
row county, were united in marri
age at the courthouse Tuesday by
J. 0. Hager, justice of the peace,
following issuance of license at the
clerk's office.
For the dance at lone, Nov. 20,
Willows grange dance committee
sponsors, promise all members of
the orchestra will be on hand. They
express regrets that this was not the
case at a recent dance sponsored by
them.
Lyle Tilden, turkey grader from
Hermiston, spent several days m
this vicinity this week looking over
local birds. Several flocks here
about will turn out some fine birds
this year, he says.
Margaret O' Conner Glavey was
transacting business in town Tues
day from the Rhea creek ranch. Fa
vorable growing conditions on the
range are prevailing at present, she
reported.
James Carsner was here Tuesday
on business from the ranch near
Spray. He got his buck deer this
season as is his annual custom with
good hunting grounds close at hand.
Bill Greener came in from the
ranch south of Hardman Saturday,
being interested, among other things,
in securing information from the
county agent on killing gophers.
X Mrs. Mary Lindsey was transact
ing business in the city Tuesday
from the Morgan vicinity, being in
terested in a number of social events
scheduled by Willows grange.
Donald Peterson, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Oscar Peterson of lone, under
went an emergency operation for
ruptured appendix at Heppner hos
pital Tuesday evening.
American Legion Auxiliary will
hold the regular business meeting
Monday evening, Nov. 8, at the home
of Mrs. Harold Cohn. All members
are urged to attend.
W. Dixon has returned to his
home in Seattle after a two-months
sojourn with his son, Marvin Dixon,
CCC educational adviser, and fam
iiy.
Mrs. Frank Alfred spent the week
end with Mr. Alfred, coming up
from The Dalles where she is assist
ing in state relief work.
The Women's Foreign Missionary
society of the Methodist church will
meet in the basement of the church
Tuesday, Nov. 9, at 2:30 p. m.
Ervin Anderson was a business
visitor in the city from the lone
vicinity Monday.
Mr. and Mrs. Louis Marquardt
were visiting friends in town Sun
day from the north Lexington farm.
Harold French, and Mr. and Mrs.
Edwin Hughes of the Lena district
were callers in town yesterday.
Mr. and Mrs. W. E. Pruyn and
Mrs. Mary Thomson spent a few
days in Pendleton this week.
Mrs. Archie Padberg was a busi
ness visitor in the city Saturday
from Lexington.
W. H. French was in town Tues
day from Blue Mountain farm south
of Hardman.
Mr. and Mrs. W. Y. Ball left this
week for a week's vacation in Port
land.
Frank Rumble left this week for
Missoula, Mont., for a two weeks
visit.
For sale or trade, Chev. coupe, '31
model in good condition, at a bar
gain. See Ruth Aiken at Lotus
Robison ranch, 1 mi. below Rugg
on Rhea creek. 30tf.
C. A. MINOR VISITS
C. A. Minor of Mt. Vernon, and
Mr. and Mrs. Phil Brady, son-in-law
and daughter, of Mitchell, were vis
itors in the city Friday. Mr. Minor
consulted a physician while in the
city, having received injuries from
a fall while hunting a few days be
fore that contributed to his feeling
of illness. He reported that he is
starting a new nidustry with the as
sistance of two grandsons, Minor,
son of Mr. and Mrs. Brady, and the
other the son of Mr. and Mrs. Ellis
Minor. This industry is the making
of pottery for which locally acquired
materials are used. He foresees a
bright future for this industry. While
visiting at the home of his son, Ellis,
in the Ozark region of Missouri re
cently, Mr. Minor was granted an
audience with Grace O'Neill, artist,
at her castle on the bank of a nearby
lake, who asked to see him after
reading one of his poems. The art
ist's castle was a veritable museum
of antiques, worthy of several days'
time for thorough inspection, said
Mr. Minor. A chair in which he was
privileged to sit was valued at $5000.
Miss O'Neill herself was a very gra
cious and charming hostess and the
visit proved enjoyable and profitable.
U. S. Geological
Survey Director
Lived Here as Boy
Another Heppner boy who has
risen to high place was revealed in
the current issue of Pacific Power
& Light Company Bulletin, which
reported:
Dr. W. C. Mendenhall, director
of the U. S. Geological survey,
visited the Portland office Sep
tember 28 to confer with Lewis A.
McArthur on problems in con
nection with the topographic map
ping program of the United States.
Also present at the meetings were
Messrs. Canfield and Piper of the
Portland office of the geological
survey.
Dr. Mendenhall, whose head
quarters are in Washington, D. C,
is a former Oregonian. He lived in
Heppner as a very small boy and
later attended the old Portland
high school on Southwest Morri
son street.
HEARING OF PUPILS
GOOD IN COUNTY
More Handicapped by Poor
Eyesight; Work on Typhoid
Promised at Boardman
Hearing of Morrow county school
pupils was revealed to be generally
good, with a larger number handi
capped by poor vision than by poor
hearing, reports Miss Althea Stone
man at the completion of two months
of special health work in the coun
ty under sponsorship of Morrow
County Public Health association
and the county court.
In determining those pupils of
poor hearing, audiometer tests were
given all pupils in the county from
the fourth grade through the
high school. Loss of hearing above
6 percent in one or both ears was
revealed in but 18 cases, while only
five were placed in the handicapped
class where loss of hearing in one or
both ears was 20 percent or more.
Folowing up the local tuberculo
sis clinics, Drs. Odell and Newmeyer
at the Eastern Oregon Tuberculosis
hospital flouroscoped fifty individ
uals of whom three were x-rayed.
No active lung envolvement was
found. Some had made a complete
healing of infected glands and with
one exception others were making
satisfactory progress.
Miss Stoneman reports that the
state board of health through Dr.
Bostrum has promised to clear up
the typhoid situation at Boardman.
The STAR REPORTER
A WEEK OF HITS!
FRIDAY- SATURDAY
DEVIL'S SADDLE LEGION
with Dick Foran
(the singing cowboy)
and Anne Nagle
plus
Jane Withers in
WILD AND WOOLY
with Walter Brcnnan, Pauline
Moore, "Alfalfa" Switzer, Jack
Searl, Barton Churchill
SUNDAY-MONDAY 2 Days Only!!
M-G-M's FINEST ACHIEVEMENT!
I QAEffKI
IV
lUISl
Mlilll-RMIIiil
' HERE AT
i ipitlv last at
I M I DA Oil! AD
TUESDAY
Kay Francis in Flirting With Death," Episode
CONFESSION . 10 of Jungle Menace
with
Ian Hunter - Basil Rathbone It's the Big Night-
WEDNESDAY-THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 10-11 (Big Game Nights)
THE RITZ BROTHERS in
LIFE BEGINS IN COLLEGE
with Joan Davis, Tony Martin, Gloria Stuart, Fred Stone, Nat Pendleton
Also: "Football Champions" News of the Day
Community Sing of Football Songs
STAR THEATER
He has been doing this work for
years, in fact all kinds of public
health work. He recently attended
a parent-teachers meeting at Board
man where he was invited to speak
on typhoid, and cited that 25 cases of
typhoid had been known in Board
man in the last 25 years, resulting in
three known deaths.
Noted Books Given
To U. of O. Library
University of Oreeon. Euffene. Oct.
30. A presentation of 25 volumes
of fine printing was made by John
Henry Nash, noted typographer, to
the University of Oreeon librarv at
the dedication ceremonies held re
cently.
All of the books were nrinted at
Dr. Nash's private press in San
Jjrancisco. They include some of his
recent works, which are recognized
by typographical experts as among
the finest in the world.
Outstanding volumes are: Milton's
"Paradise Lost and Paradise Re
gained," printed for the Limited Edi
tions club in 1936; the "Life of Jessie
Benton Fremont," 1936; and Pren
tice Mulford's "California Sketches,"
printed for the California Book club
in 1935.
The Tom Beymer family has re
turned to the county from Redmond
and have again taken up residence
on the farm on Hinton creek.
DMA
DSepaiir
Tubes Tested Free
Latest Equipment
SEE THE
New ZENITH
FARM RADIOS
ESTIMATES GIVEN
ALL WORK GUARANTEED
BRUCE GIBB
Mr. and Mrs. D. Cox were in town
yesterday from the Hinton creek
farm.
Sunday
Dinner
A Specialty
Private Dinner
Parties
Arranged
MERRILL'S
CAFE
NO DEVASTATING
COLD STARTING with the
The "CAT"
These cold mornings make Caterpillar
owners appreciate its independent
starting system, making possible a Die
sel engine designed for minimum wear
and fuel economy.
See a footballer trotting on the side
lines; horses practicing before the race;
airplanes "reving" their engines before
the take-off.
It's the conditioning period known as
"warming up." "Caterpillar" Diesel en
gines use it. The starting engine (strict
ly independent) turns the big engine
over to break the oil film, runs it against
comprssion, but without fuel until it is
warm.
Thus is the "Caterpillar" Diesel condi
tioned for starting cylinder tempera
tures are sufficient oil is flowing to
vital parts before the engine starts.
BRADEN-BELL
Tractor 6 Equipment Co.
Morrow County's Own Store