Heppner gazette-times. (Heppner, Or.) 1925-current, January 09, 1936, Page PAGE THREE, Image 3

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    HEPFNER GAZETTE TIMES, HEPPNER, OREGON, THURSDAY, JAN. 9, 1936.
PAGE THREE
Lai Hupp
Frank S. Parker and Geo. N.
Peck, commissioners, and Harry
Tamblyn, engineer, motored to
Portland yesterday afternoon to
attend sessions of the annual con
vention of county judges and com
missioners of the state tomorrow
and Saturday. They expected to
arrive in time to meet with the
state highway commission whose
monthly meeting Is being held to
day. Charles W. Smith, assistant state
county agent leader and former
county agent here, called at the
local county agent's office Monday
and enjoyed greeting old-time
friends. His present work takes
him to all parts of the state from
his home at Corvallis. He reported
the family well located at the col
lege town and enjoying life.
Members of the John Wightman
family motored to Sunnyslde, Wn.,
Saturday to attend funeral services
for an old-time friend, Dr. Harri
son who died quite suddenly there
from heart failure. Dr. Harrison
and wife visited Heppner on several
occasions.
Edith Smith is reported ill with
an attack of diphtheria at the home
of her sister, Mrs. E. J. Kelly. A
report of positive reaction to the
diphtheria test was received yes
terday morning by Dr. R. M. Rice,
county physician.
F. E. Mason was in the city yes
terday from the Rhea creek farm.
He was pleased with the moisture
recently received, but had not
checked to see how far into the
ground it had reached.
E. Jay Merrill was down from
the south Hardman ranch Monday
transacting business and' visiting
with friends. A heavy snow was
falling in his section when he left
homo that morning.
J. R. Farrington, district man
ager, and Howard Boyd, wire chief
for Pacific Telephone & Telegraph
company with headquarters at The
Dalles, were calling at the local
office yesterday.
Walter Dobyns, In the city Mon
day from lone, reported the lower
country to have rceived a good
soaking last week end, aiding crop
prospects. Water was standing in
pools at lone.
Henry Peterson was transacting
business in the city Monday from
the Eight Mile farm. The arrival
of a goodly supply of moisture had
extended his usual wide smile.
Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Troedson and
Miss Frances were transacting bus
iness In the city yesterday from the
north Morgan section. They were
well pleased with recent rains.
Mrs. Bonnie Cochran returned
home Saturday from a week's visit
at the Louis Marquardt farm home
north of Lexington. Mr. and Mrs.
Marquardt accompanied her.
Emll Marquardt was transacting
busntess In the city Monday from
the north Lexington farm. Good
rains have heightened crop pros
pects In his vicinity.
Carl Troedson was In town yes
terday from the north Morgan sec
tion. Growing prospects for the
wheat crop were enhanced by good
rains there.
Mrs. Lena Lundell of lone was
a business visitor in the city Friday.
Want Ads
For Sale By collector for Home
Comfort Range Co. Has repos
sessed wood and coal range used
about year, and half paid. Will sell
for balance due us. Write H. V.
Anderson, General Delivery, Hepp
ner. i
Lost Female police dog. Answers
to the name of Trix. Please notify
Mrs. Werner Rietmann, lone. 43.
Wagon repair factory. Experi
enced workmen. Cutting down
wheels a specialty. Guaranteed
satisfaction. Write for low prices.
Homo Supply Company, Lakeview,
Ore. 42-45p
Highest corn-elt prices for car
loads of broke or range horses,
mules and colts. Fred Chandler
Horse Mule Market, Chariton,
Iowa. 44-49.
Man Wanted for Rawleigh Route
of 800 families. Write today. Raw
leigh, Dept ORA-84-SA, Oakland,
Calif. 43-44
Stock and wheat ranch for sale
on easy terms; 7 mi. N. E. of Hepp
ner; also 370 young ewes and new
stock scales. Inquire Mr. and Mrs.
M. J. Devln, city. 43-48p
For Sale 16-ln. dry wood, near
highway, $3.50 cord. Harry French,
Hardman. 43tf.
For Sale New Hampshire cock
erels, six months, none better.
Frank Rumble, Morrow General
Hospital, Heppner. 43-44p
Hleh crude unrleht piano for un
paid 'balance;Bc295Jeppner:45
For Sale 30 tons chopped alfalfa
hav. Jason Blddle, lone. 44p
wiirhniit Aiurtern Drlces for car
loads broke or range horses, mules
and colts. Fred Chandler Horse
and Mule Market, Charlton, Iowa.
Maternity and convalescent cases
eared for In my home. Mrs. j. a.
Cason. Btf-
For Sale or Trade 1 bay horse,
8 yrs. old, 1850, broke single or dou
ble, broke to ride; one horse 6 yrs.
ia tinn hrnkA nlnirle or double;
one saddle horse, 7 yrs. old, none
better. Will trade for cattle or
sheep. W. H. French, Hardman.
Judge W. T. Campbell and Mrs.
Campbell motored to Spokane yes
terday in response to word of the
serious illness of a sister of Mr.
Campbell.
Miss Jeanette Turner, who
teaches at Boardman, was home
over the week end to be with her
mother, Mrs. F. W. Turner, who
was ill.
Mrs. F. W. Turner was confined
to her bed for several days this
week by illness. She has resigned
her teaching position at Hardman.
Jason Biddle was trading in the
city Tuesday from the Rhea creek
fan, and reported things getting
pretty well wet up out that way.
Ben O. Anderson, in the city Mon
day from Eight Mile, was smiling
broadly over good rains that had
visited his section last week end.
Jack Gorham, Boardman mer
chant, was transacting business in
the city yesterday.
IIIIIIIIIUIIUIIIUIIIIIIIIUIUIIIHIIIIUIIIUIUIU
THE
Hehisch
Published by the Journalism Class
of HEPPNER HIGH SCHOOL
Editor Dora Bailey
Assistant Louise. Anderson
Boys' Sports Paul Brown
Girls' Sports Neva Bleakman
Class News, Erma Van Schoiack
Club News Nonie McLaughlin
Grade News Necha Coblantz
Basketball . Jimmy Driscoll
Semerter Exams - Elsie Crump
Debate Norton King
Assembly Norma Jean Becket
Humor, Kathryn Parker, Norton
King.
Features, William Lee McCaleb,
Helen Van Schoiack
H.H.S.
Editorial
Another year, another semester,
and another chance to make good.
Are we going to take advantage of
this chance or just pass it by? Many
of us have failed to do our best
during the past semester. We have
let things come and go as they
might. We have not done our part
toward making our school better.
If we intend to be proud of our
school, we will have to do our part
When we have finished school, we
should like to look back and be
proud of our school days, because
we were one of the bolts that held
the machine together. If we are one
of the bolts, we can't be loose. We
must keep to our standard and do
our best If the bolts become loose,
the machine cannot hold together.
If we do not do our best, what will
become of the school?
This new semester gives us an
other chance to be better students,
and make our school a better one.
Let us make use of this chance by
starting out the new semester right
Let us do our best in keeping our
work up, in getting our assignments
and In supporting our school. We
cannot be the beat in the class per
haps; but we can do as the poet,
Douglas Mallach, advises:
"If you cant be a highway, then
just be a trail,
If you can't be the sun, be a star;
It isn't by size that you win, or
you fail;
Be the best of whatever you are."
H.H.S..-
SomesW Examinations
The semester examinations are
to be given on Thursday and Fri
day of next week. The examinations
for the morning1 classes will be giv
en on Thursday and the afternoon
classes on Friday. Any student
getting the grade of 3- or above will
be exempted from the examinations
with the exception of those who
have three or more demerits.
H.H.S.
Grade School News
The first graders are working on
farm problems and farm animals.
These yougsters have acquired a
great deal of reading material to
promote their knowledge about the
farm. The third graders are also
studying animals.
Mr. Bun man was absent the first
I "CROWING WITH THE WEST"
OREGON
MUTUAL
TIFeW
HOME OFFICEi PORTLAND, OREGON
LEILA N. RICE
Dlst Manager
EDDIE M. KENNY
Local Agent
of the week because of illness. Mrs.
Paul Gemmell substituted for him.
H.H.8.
Intramural Basketball
This week the boys' gym class
started intramural basketball. The
entire class was divided Into teams
of approximately equal strength.
This league will last for four weeks;
each team will play every other
team each week. At the end of the
four weeks' period each player will
be given an individual test on the
fundamentals of basketball. The
twelve boys scoring highest on this
test, general Improvement and con
duct will receive awards.
H.H.S.
Irish Play Close One
Led by McCulloch, a sharpahoot
ing guard, the Condon hoopsters
came out on top of a thrilling 20-18
score against the Fighting Irish.
Displaying much improvement and
a return of fighting spirit the local
lads turned on a last quarter rally
that brought the crowd to its feet,
but just fell short of the necessary
margin for victory. It is hoped that
improved team work and shooting
will be evidenced for the next home
game Friday, when the Arlington
Honkers come to the local court
H.H.S.
Girls' Sports
Miss Rockhold, Instructor of
girls' sports, is starting to organize
a girls' basketball team, but as yet
a definite team has not been chosen.
Those who have been turning out
and the positions played are as fol
lows: Forwards, Evelyn Kirk,
Frances McCarty, Arlene Morton
and Neva Bleakman; guards, Dora
Bailey, Rose Cunningham, Norma
Christenson and Irena McFerrin;
Jumping centers, Kathryn Parker
and Ethyl Hughes; running centers,
Marie Barlow and Margaret Brown
ing. The teams will not play with
other school teams, but will play
interclass basketball.
It has been decided to practice
two nights each week In order to
learn the technique of basketball.
H.H.S.
Debate
The public speaking class Is dis
cussing, previous to debating, the
question that has been chosen by
the Oregon State Debating league
for debating competition. This
question is: "Resolved, that the
several states should enact legisla
tion for a system of complete med
ical service available to all citizens
at public expense." This question,
as is evidenced, should be of great
importance to everyona There are
many people who haven't sufficient
funds for medical care they require.
In the ensuing debate that will take
place in the class, the students have
been divided into teams. Half of
them are affirmative and the other
half negative. It is expected that
before the end of the next semester
there will be many "hot" debates
between the different tams on the
question.
H.H.S.
Assembly
Last Friday an assembly was held
at which the boys received the let
ters they had earned playing foot
ball. Mr. Blankenship presented
the letters and a few appropriate
words with each one.
The boys receiving letters for the
first time were Norton King, Larry
Forgey, William McRoberts, Ber
nard McMurdo and William Mc
Caleb.
The two year lettermen were La
Verne Van Marter, Riley Munkers,
Leonard Gilman, Boyd Redding,
James Farley, Ray Coblantz and
James Driscoll.
Howard Furlong and Howard
Bryant received their third letter
this year which entitled them to
sweaters. These sweaters were
presented to the boys with their
letters.
LaVerne Van Marter and Larry
Forgey were not present to receive
their letters., Larry has moved to
Portland and La Verne is absen
on account of illness.
Paul Brown and Don Turner
were injured at the first of the sea
son and consequently they could not
earn their letters.
H.H.S.
Humor
The Ideal Boy Must Have:
Hair like Howard Furlongs,
Eyes like Jimmy Farley's,
Teeth like Don Turner's,
Skin like Ellis Williams',
Voice like Lemoine Cox's,
Athletic ability like Len Gilman's,
Knowledge like Jimmy Driscoll's,
Sense of humor like Buddy Bat
ty's, Car like Paul Brown's,
Personality like La Verne Van
Marter's,
Favorite Sayings:
"Hello, cutie" Jimmy Farley.
"Well, I don't see why" Arleta
Ashbaugh.
"I'm not either bashful" Lois
Ashbaugh.
"There goes the C.C.C.'s" Ruth
Co wins.
"You and who else?" Andy
Shoun.
"Yoo hoo" Pinky Clark.
"Using the slang term" Coach.
"I'll guess with you" Babyface
King.
"Yo' is a houn' dog" Howard
Bryant
"I wouldn't know" Howard Fur
long. "Oh, Spud!" Lola Coxen.
"Izzat so?" Ethyl Hughes.
"Now I could take a Terraplane
and "Ray Coblantz.
"I'm all a dither" Marie Barlow.
"I've got to have seventy cents
by Saturday nite" Riley Mun
kers. "I'll use drastic measures" Mr.
Bloom.
"Remind me to hate you" Ruth
Furlong.
"Get away, or I'll massage your
dome with this club" Ruth
Green.
"I refuiz" Arlene Morton.
"Well, after all" Dora Bailey.
"Running like sonny-gun" Mar-
jorie Parker.
"Well, bless me" Paul Brown.
H.H.B.
Because of the death of her moth
er, Miss Peterson, the commercial
teacher, was absent from school
since last Thursday noon until
Tuesday. Mrs. Bloom substituted
for her.
H.H.S.
"H" Club Busy
Pardon me, Mr. J. Q. Public, but
could I interest you in a show, "The
Hoosier Schoolmaster," to be given
at the Star theater in Heppner on
the evennigs of Tuesday and Wed
nesday, January 21 and 22? Part
of the proceeds will be given to the
"H" club of the high school to pay
for letters and sweaters awarded
to football and basketball team
members. People who have seen
the show gay that It Is very good.
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It is taken from the book of the
same name by Egglesworth. The
tickets are 10 and 35c.
(Adapted from sales talk of "H"
club member.)
H.H.S.
Club News
A Benzine Ring meeting was held
last Thursday evening. Don Tur
ner, newly elected member, was
initiated into the ring. Miss Case,
the first grade teacher, was an in
vited guest. She gave a very in
teresting talk on "Arts" and ex
hibited some of her own charcoal
drawing, which were very beautiful.
The candy and popcorn sale
which the Girls' league held last
Friday evening at the basketball
game turned out very successfully,
even though some of the girls suf
fered various accidents while mak
ing the candy and popcorn.
H.H.S.
Class News
The art and design class is start
ing on color designs this week. The
home economics department is
making breakfast breads.
The junior class held a class
meeting Monday to discuss the sub
ject of class dues. Only about half
have paid their class dues. This
money is necessary for the junior
senior banquet held next semester.
The subject of getting class rings
this year instead of next year was
also discussed but no decision was
made.
PINE CITY
By LENN'A NEILL
O. F. Bartholomew returned to
Salt Lake City Saturday after
spending his Christmas vacation
with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. C.
H. Bartholomew. Miss Oleta Neill
accompanied him as far as La
Grande where she is attending the
Eastern Oregon Normal school.
Several people have the mumps
this week.
A large number of ladies gath
ered at the C. H. Bartholomew home
Thursday to quilt on a quilt A pot
luck dinner was served at noon.
Emery Cox helped pick turkeys
at the Gaylord Madison ranch Sat
urday. Clayton Knotts of Montana spent
New Year's vacation with his sister,
Mrs. John Harrison.
Mrs. OUie Neill and daughters
Oleta and Lenn spent New Year's
day with Miss Neva Neill In Stan
field. Ray Ayers, who is In the Heppner
ner hospital with double pneumo
nia, is reported to be getting along
very nicely.
W. D. Neill and son Harold ac
ocmpanied Bob Beebe to Portland
Sunday, returning home Tuesday
mornnig.
Mr. and Mrs. Walter Wiggles
worth and children spent Wednes
day evening visiting at the home of
Mr. and Mrs. Emery Cox.
Miss Rachel Sloan of Stanfleld
was an over-night guest at the
home of Mr. and Mrs. John Harri
son Wednesday.
E. B. Wattenburger and son Ju
nior were business visitors in Hepp
ner and lone Saturday.
Mr. and Mrs. John Healy and
son Tom were business visitors In
Heppner Saturday.
Mr. and Mrs. John Harrison spent
Sunday evening at the E. B. Wat
tenburger home.
Excellent results from the Use of
Gazette Times Want Ads are re
ported to us each week.
VIE
The First National Bank
of Portland, Oregon
Condensed Statement of Head Office and 26 Branches
As of December 31, 1935
r RESOURCES
, Cash on Hand and Due from Banks $15,560,744.55
United States Bonds 18,696,313.53 $34,257,058.08
Municipal and Other Bonds 19,824,375.11
Loans and Discounts 17,521,742.29
Stock in Federal Reserve Bank ------- 141,750.00
Bank Premises, Furniture and Fixture ... - 2,004,422.52
Other Real festate Owned 155,006.31 '
Customers' Liability Acceptances ----- 43,373.62
Interest Earned 882,492.01 ;
Subscription to Federal Deposit Insurance - - - 70,755.67,
Other Resources 92,619.10
TOTAL ------ $74,493,594.71
LIABILITIES
Capital $2,500,000.00
Surplus 2,225,000.00
Undivided Profits 604,811.89 $ 5,329,811.89 ,
Reserves for Contingencies, Interest, Expenses, etc. 263,890.45
Acceptances - -- -- -- -- -- -- 43,373.62
Other Liabilities - 31,746.25
Deposits 68,824,772.50
TOTAL - - - $74,493,594.71
MAIN BRANCH. . .
UPTOWN BRANCH ,
Other Portland Branches
FIFTH, SIXTH AND STARK
. SIXTH AND MORRISON
ROSE CITY BRANCH
UNION AND RUSSELL BRANCH
EAST PORTLAND BRANCH
SOUTHEAST PORTLAND BRANCH
MONTAVILLA BRANCH
LIVESTOCK KENTON BRANCH
Branches Outside of Portland
ALBANY GRESHAM LAKEVIEW SALEM
ASTORIA HEPPNER MEDFORD STAYTON
CONDON HILLSBORO NYSSA THE DALLES
ENTERPRISE LA GRANDE PENDLETON TILLAMOOK
UNION
WOODBURN
THIS BANK IS A MEMBER OF THE FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION
rt
r' LESSONS NEARLY
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2. Olast reflector softens
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i. Look for the certifica
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Is your child reluctant to do his homework?
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sult in defective vision.
The only way to be certain about your lighting
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lamps. This service is given without charge or
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er PACIFIC POWER & LIGHT COMPANT
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